Recipe For Homemade Citrus Enzyme Cleaner – Natural, Really Cheap (Almost Free) & Effective !

homemade-citrus-enzyme-cleaner-005-smallMy newly prepared eco enzyme cleaner made from lemon and orange peels (you can use any fruit peel or pulp as well. Pineapples yield the best cleaning enzymes!)

(Please READ HERE for my review and good feedback from visitors and myself of this wonderful enzyme :wink: )

(READ HERE on how to make Dragon Fruit Enzyme to drink for health)

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Good afternoon, dear friends :D

Heheh, for quite a while, I was suffering from a writer’s block – there was so much to tell you but every time I select the “New Post” option here, I ended up just staring at the blank page and no words came out…my mind felt like it was stuck in quicksand! :oops:

Anyway, I would say that the Earth Hour campaign carried out here in Malaysia a few weeks ago was a great success – environmental awareness has increased and there were many good articles in the local newspapers promoting environmental friendly programmes and articles.

One of them that caught my eye was the recipe or method for making our own enzymes using fruit and vegetable scraps or leftovers from the kitchen. These enzymes are really good and effective as a multi-purpose cleaner.

I have been using a fruit and enzyme based floor cleaner to mop my floors for the last 13 years but I bought the floorwash from a chemical engineer who made this environmental friendly floorwash for sale.  After mopping the floor, I would pour the water into my pots of plants, which would bloom beautifully….i.e. the floorwash doubled as a plant fertiliser, too. :wink:

Last year, a friend told me the “recipe” for making our own ezymatic cleaner…but I didn’t really try making some until I read about it in the newspapers last month. It was actually called “The Garbage Enzyme” but I thought the word “garbage” sounds kind of yucky and decided to modify things a bit and made my own Citrus Enzyme, consisting of lemon and orange leftovers.

Some wonderful uses recommended for this non-toxic, environmental friendly enzyme (dilute enzyme with some water, use more if you prefer a stronger concentration) -

1) do dishes and laundry (use 1/4 cup of enzyme). For dishes – add a squirt or two of dish detergent to create suds for better cleaning.

2) for washing bathrooms and toilets. grime comes off easily (1 part enzyme to 10 parts water). Be sure to add a good squirt or two of dish detergent because the suds produced will make it even easier to clean the scum on the walls and floor.

3) for removing stubborn stains and odours (coloured fabrics and floors) (use undiluted) and leave on for some time (it depends on how bad the stain is)….this is very good for removed accidental bloodstains (in panties)

4) to clean vegetables and fruits (1 part enzyme to 10 parts water) for first rinse. Thereafter, rinse in a bowl clean water twice. Vegetables and fruits will be very clean.

5) clear blockages in kitchen sinks and drains (use concentrated or blended pulp/sludge of enzyme)…pour into sink and leave overnight.

6) as a natural insect repellent (use undiluted) for ants, cockroaches.. (pouring some enzyme into sink/bath/shower stall drainage holes will deter cockroaches). My home is now cockroach and ant free! If the enzymes fail to deter ants and cockroaches, try using undiluted apple cider vinegar. That will work for sure but it will cost money. :idea:

7) as a floorwash to mop floors shiny clean (1 part enzyme to 20 parts water) or 1/4 cup of enzyme to half a pail of water

8 ) as fertiliser for vegetables, flowering and non-flowering plants (use 1 part enzyme to 20 parts water, or use the leftover mop water). For use as fertilizers, you must use as little enzyme as possible so that the plants don’t die.

9) as a skincare product, e.g. facial cleanser or toner (1 part enzyme to 2 parts water)

10) wash cars – cars will look as if they have just been polished! (1 part enzyme to 20 parts water). If the car is really dirty, I use 1 part enzyme to 5 parts water.

11) pet areas or pet accidents – for urine, wipe off all urine on floor with paper kitchen towels. Then pour 1/4 cup of undiluted enzyme onto that part of the floor. Use a paper kitchen towel to smear enzyme over a larger area. Then wipe dry with more kitchen towels. Pour 1/4 cup of water onto floor and wipe dry with paper kitchen towels or a mop. The floor should be clean by then.

12) remove warts and age spots on neck and shoulders – use undiluted enzyme on those areas and leave on for 10 minutes every day during shower. You will notice the spots lightening up. Note – this feedback was provided by a follower here :idea: – I have not tried this yet. :oops:

13) to clean glass and mirrors – use 1 part enzyme to 3 parts water and pour into a spray bottle. Spray onto glass and wipe dry with a cotton cloth, paper kitchen towels, or old newspapers. This solution cleans glass even better than those commercial window cleaners!

Currently, most people that I  know are making this enzyme at home and many have confirmed its wonderful uses. Even my regular air-condition service/repair man said his wife has been using this homemade enzyme to wash her face and she has given it a name – SK3 ! :lol:

I made a small batch of enzyme to try it out for myself, and I have posted a pictorial recipe below. I  only used 10 % of the total ingredients required because I was impatient to get the enzyme started and I didn’t have a large enough plastic container. Anyway, the curiousity got the better of me and I didn’t want to go through waiting over a few weeks to accumulate the 3 kg of vegetable and fruit scraps from my kitchen. :lol:

Citrus Enzyme Based Multipurpose Cleaner

To begin, you need a plastic container with an airtight cover. Here, I have used an old 2-litre fruit juice bottle. The enzyme takes 3 months to “ferment” and be ready for use.

Ingredients :-

homemade-citrus-enzyme-cleaner-001-small

100 gms of brown sugar

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homemade-citrus-enzyme-cleaner-002-small

300 gms of lemon and orange scraps (these were leftover after I had juiced them)

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homemade-citrus-enzyme-cleaner-003-small

1 litre tap water

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homemade-citrus-enzyme-cleaner-004-small

Use a funnel to pour sugar into the bottle. Drop in the fruit slices. Pour in the water.

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homemade-citrus-enzyme-cleaner-005-small

Cover the bottle and date it, so that you will know when the enzyme is ready to use , i.e. 3  months later on

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homemade-citrus-enzyme-cleaner-006-small Give the ingredients in the bottle a good shake to mix them thoroughly. Everyday, for the first month, open the cover to let out the oxygen build-up from the fermentation process. On some days, you will see the bottle swelling up in size.

Added on 27 August, 2010

Since I last posted this, I had modified the method of avoiding (based on comments by visitors here)  extreme gas build-ups leading to explosions by leaving the bottle cap loosely fastened (about halfway tightened ? ) – this will allow some gas to come out at all times and there won’t be any buildup of gas :idea:

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homemade-fruit-enzyme-small

The above picture is my bottle of enzyme that is now almost 1 month old. To read more about this amazing enzyme cleaner from my local newspaper,  CLICK HERE

Added on 27 August, 2010 -

If you see any whitish stuff growing on top of the liquid, just tighten the bottle cover, and give the contents a good, gentle shake and the whitish stuff will be mixed into the liquid. Then loosen the bottle cap again to allow gas to escape.  :idea:

Have fun using your homemade enzyme! :D

With best wishes,

choesf :D

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509 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    that’s so interesting! does it smell hideous when it’s a finished product? thanks!

    • 2

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear innerspaceyoga :D

      Thus far, my citrus enzyme has a lovely “fruity, citrus fragrance” to it, it doesn’t smell at all. However, I would presume that those enzymes made from kitchen scraps like vegetables, fruits and potato peels may smell. Today, I made another 1 litre water of enzyme from apples leftover from juicing…I’m not sure how that will turn out.

      I forgot to mention in my post that when the enzyme is ready for use at the end of the 3- month fermentation process, just filter the enzyme with a piece of muslin cloth or an old t-shirt. I read in the newspapers that the local wet markets, which often smell at the end of a trading day, use only 1 litre of the enzyme to clean/wash the whole place and the stink is all gone.

      Have a wonderful week ahead!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 8

      Jennifer said,

      yes

      • 9

        hailey said,

        u can also use a few drops of citrus bliss from dutera or the young living essential oil very fast and cheap considering the bottle is 15 to 18 dollars for 15 ml its aromatherapy too and makes u feel happy and smells divine u can also add to this cleanser after the three months

      • 10

        Hi there, dear hailey :D

        Thank you very much for your tip on adding the essential oils into the enzyme for better smells and for aromatherapy, too! My favourite scent is lavender. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  2. 11

    rozalia said,

    Dearest choesf! :)

    I’m so glad to see you’re back and feeling well. It is the first time I hear about this wonder cleaner.I’m interested especially in using it as fertilizer for plants : do we have to dilute it or not? If yes in what proportion?

    Thank you. With lots of love, rose

    • 12

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Thank you, dearest Rose! I am back to my usual self and today is Day 3 of my second Gallbladder Cleanse. Meanwhile, I am counting the days impatiently with you until you can get out of bed! :wink:

      I don’t exactly know how much of enzyme to put as fertiliser but I am assuming about 2 tablespoons to a litre or 4 cups of water. Since it is almost free to produce this enzyme ourselves, I think I will use more enzyme in proportion to the water…up to 1/4 cup of enzyme for 1 litre of water, perhaps? Yesterday, I made another 2 litres of fruit enzyme – one from apple peels and the other one a combination of apple and orange scraps. :lol:

      Here is more interesting information on making our own enzyme-based cleaners and fertilisers.

      With love and hugs,

      choesf :D

      • 13

        K said,

        You got sick? what happened? how do you feel about a doctor and specialist in waste management saying there might be pathogens (disease-causing bacteria) in the sludge?

        “Since it involves fermentation of waste, there might be pathogens in the mixture.”

        Dr. P. Agarmuthu quoted in http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2009/4/7/lifefocus/20090406185815&sec=lifefocus

      • 14

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, dear K :D

        Thank you for pointing out that article in the newspaper regarding possible harmful pathogens in the enzyme. I had ready that earlier, too, before I started making the enzymes for cleaning.

        I think what is important is that the scraps that we use must be clean and not contaminated with meats and pesticides. I don’t use any vegetables but only cleaned, fruit peels. That is why it is better to make our own cleaning enzyme that buy it as we don’t know what had gone into making by other people.

        Heheh, I got sick from earlier from gallstones….not from using the cleaning enzyme as the rest of my family were fine. :lol:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  3. 15

    rozalia said,

    Thank you,dear chesf for the quick reply. I’ll try that asap. Hugs, rose

    • 16

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      You are most welcome, dearest Rose! Let me know how yours turn out. :wink:

      With love and hugs,

      choesf :D

  4. 17

    irene said,

    after extracting the juice from the fruits, can we use the palps to do the enzymes?

    • 18

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Irene :D

      Yes, we can. That was what I used to make the enzymes, but I used mainly the peels that were left, because the mushy pulp will absorb most of the sugar liquid.

      With best wishes for good health,

      choesf :D

  5. 19

    manila said,

    Hi Choesf,

    Wow!

    Sounds really good. Can I use white sugar instead? Should be fine, it will help in fermentation. What do you say? Do I need to strain it after 3 months and then use?? I will give it a go.

    Thanks for the lovely tip.

    • 20

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear manila :D

      I was going to write about my experience with using this enzyme as a cleaner – last Sunday, I couldn’t wait for the enzyme to be fully matured and I had a “sneak preview” of the enzyme – I used it to clean my whole house with fantastic results! :shock: :D :D

      I strongly recommend everyone who can to try making this enzyme and see for themselves its wonderful cleansing, environmental friendly powers.

      I’m sorry I can’t advise if white sugar can be used instead of brown sugar. :oops: Perhaps, you may like to give it a try? :wink:

      Do have a lovely week!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  6. 21

    cw said,

    dear choesf,
    enjoy yur posts immensely, inspired my own as well…
    i have 2 1 liter bottles fermenting at the moment and am starting on my 3rd one. getting the leftover peels is a breeze as the local wet market has tons!
    esp pineapple skins.
    and yes, veg does make it smell a bit so i use only fruits. am also waiting impatiently for the 3 months to come!
    btw, rozalia, you can check out my post:

    http://cwmustardseed.wordpress.com/?s=garbage+in

    for usage proportions.

    • 22

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear cw :D

      Thank you for sharing your experience and for link on usage proportions. I have a friend who had also used pineapple peels to make her enzymes. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 23

      davidpernici said,

      How did your batches turn out?

  7. 26

    mark said,

    Hi Choesf,

    I got some questions.

    When use as fertiliser, will it attracts ants?
    Is there anything or equipment that can be used to test the presence or concentration of enzyme?
    Is it safe to use enzyme on our bare hands?

    Thanks in advance.

    Cheers! Mark

    • 27

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello again, dear Mark :D

      A few days ago, I used blended the pulp from my newly matured cleaner enzyme and mix it with 5 litres of water. I used the “enzyme fertiliser” on all my plants. So far, no ants seen yet. Also, I have tried using the enzyme in full concentrate form as an insect repellent as my kitchen tends to attract tiny ants…now my kitchen has no ants trails anymore. So, the enzyme does work as an ant (not sure about other insects) repellent. :wink:

      I’m not sure if there is anything to measure the strength of the enzyme – perhaps a biochemist may be able to answer that. My friend is a biochemist but she is out of the country at the moment. I will get the answer from her and post here when she returns to Malaysia.

      Thus far, I have found the enzyme not only to be safe on my hands but I find that my hands are even “conditioned” after using the enzyme, i.e. my skin is so much smoother, I need not use hand lotion. My air condition servicemen told me his wife even use the diluted enzyme to wash her face and her facial complexion is so good now. She even calls it “SK-3″. It’s that good. I have not tried this way yet.

      Cheers!

      choesf :D

      • 28

        mark said,

        Dear Choesf

        Thank you for the answer.

        About two weeks ago, while releasing the pressure in one of the bottle of my fruit enzyme, the content spilled over and wetted the paper box. I decided not to clear the spillage. About few hours later some small ants (residents) came and fed on the spill. I tasted the spill around the neck of the bottle and found it a little sweet. Interesting, the ants were all gone the next day even the box was still wetted. I can’t find ants in my home since then. I have no idea whether they were dead or have left but for sure to treat them with enzyme when they return. Dead or fled? Please let me know if you got the answer.

        Cheers!
        Mark

      • 29

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, dear Mark :D

        You are most welcome. Heheh, my enzyme bottles have exploded a couple of times, too, especially with my apple enzymes which somehow had more gas buildup. I had to clean my kitchen. However, I learned a lesson and have a tip for when we feel that the enzyme bottle is already very tight and going to explode when we unscrew the cover. Just place a large enough plastic bag over the bottle and then unscrew the cover slowly. Whatever is exploded out of the bottle will be within the plastic bag – no mess to clean up and we can pour back the “stuff” back into the bottle, no wastage also. :idea:

        Yes, when the enzyme is still relatively new, which I think is within the first month, it is still sweet and may attract some ants. But after fermentation is sufficient, the enzyme is no longer sweet but more sourish and becomes an insect repellent instead. :wink:

        Cheers!

        choesf :D

  8. 30

    cw said,

    For your information, MBPJ in collaboration with Beautiful Gates, Justlife and Section 19 RA is running a pilot project of educating PJ households of making the enzyme.

    For RA/RT or schools or organisations or corporates in PJ interested, we are offering to hold a talk and demonstration for them free of charge. AND every attendee will also be given a 300ml bottle of enzyme for trial. The project will end at early September. For those interested, please do not hesistate to contact Mr Lee at lee@mbpj.gov.my or 012-2081489.

    • 31

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Thank you for the contact details for Mr Lee at MBPJ, dear cw. Interested visitors in Petaling Jaya can contact him to arrange a demonstration on this enzyme. :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  9. 32

    cw said,

    hi choesf,

    recently i came across cooking oil containers that looked ideal for the eco enzyme. do you have a quick tip as to how to get rid of the residual oil? using a liquid soap would contaminate the insides?
    what’s you suggestion?
    thanks!

    cw

    • 33

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear cw :D

      I think you can use a mixture of white vinegar and some dish detergent to quickly wash the cooking oil containers, rinse them well and it should be okay. :wink:

      Have fun with preparing your enzyme!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  10. 35

    Jon Q said,

    This is a great idea! I’m trying it now. The reason it takes so long to ferment is that you’re relying on the tiny amount of natural yeast that lives on the citrus peels to reproduce and eat all that sugar. Since there isn’t much yeast at the beginning, it takes a long time to get the fermentation going. You can speed it up considerably by adding a spoonful of yeast at the beginning. It should take less than two weeks if there’s enough yeast. Another way to speed it up is to save the liquid / sludge at the bottom and use it in your next batch, it will speed things up a lot. Try using a balloon instead of a lid, it will stop the bottles exploding.

    • 36

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Jon Q :D

      Thank you so much for your great tips in –

      1) using yeast to speed up the fermentation and cut down the maturation time to 2 weeks

      2) using the sludge at the bottom of the matured batch of enzyme cleaner to start off the next batch – also to speed the fermentation process

      3) using a balloon over the mouth of the bottle to prevent explosion during fermentation.

      Heheh, I am interested to see how big the balloon will grow with the gas build-up, just out of curiousity. I shall go get some balloons today. :lol:

      I just made a 3 bottles of citrus fruit enzyme cleaners yesterday – they were leftovers peels from making citrus fruit enzyme for drinking. I will try some yeast in one bottle, some leftover mature enzyme sludge in the other 2 bottles and replace their caps with balloons. Then I shall post some feedback here. :idea:

      Thank you again for sharing your information. Do have a lovely weekend ahead!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 37

      davidpernici said,

      Are you saying add a spoon of yeast to a liter?

      Have you tried this? If so, did you compare the results to the three months fermentation process?

  11. 38

    K said,

    Hey, are you selling any of that? I’d love to use it, but I wouldn’t want to wait 3 months or deal with all that garbage :P

    • 39

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear K:D

      I’m afraid I am not selling any of that. May I know where you are from? If you are in Kuala Lumpur, I have seen some places selling the cleaning enzyme at RM5 for a 500ml bottle.

      Meanwhile, Jon Q has some tips on how to shorten the fermentation process of the enzyme – for beginners, just add some yeast to the mixture and fermentation time is cut down to 2 weeks, instead of 3 months.

      Or you may like to try out the Rice Water Cleaning Enzyme – it takes only 1 week to ferment for use.

      Just use the water from the first wash/rinse of your rice. For every 1 litre of rice water, use at least 50gm of brown sugar (can put more sugar if you just want to estimate. 50 gm is about 5 tablespoons of sugar). Keep for 1 week.

      To use – pour out some rice water enzyme and add in about 10-20 % of dish detergent (to get the suds), add in enough water to get the cleaning strength that you like and this mixture can be used for cleaning.

      I noticed that the rice water enzyme is very good for heavy duty cleaning in the kitchen as it cuts grease very well. It was really easy to wash my oily woks, greasy mixing bowls used for preparing cake batters, and clean my kitchen tiles/cooking hobs, etc.

      Try and see…

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 40

        davidpernici said,

        Are there other areas of use for the rice enzyme?

      • 41

        Hi there, dear David :D

        The rice enzyme can be used as a natural enzyme cleaner, too, like the citrus enzyme. I have friends who regularly make rice enzyme for cleaning. Personally, I prefer the citrus enzyme.

        So far, I have been making successful batches of cleaning enzymes since I last posted this article. My oldest bottle of enzyme is almost 2 years old – it smells wonderful (like wine) and cleans even better than the younger enzymes.

        My largest batch of enzyme ever made was in a 30 litre plastic pail. That was when I was also making fruit enzymes for drinking (which used a lot of fruit) and I used the peels/skins for making cleaning enzymes.

        As for the yeast to hasten fermentation, I added about 1 to 2 teaspoons of yeast to 2 litres of water. But there is no hard and fast rule, the more yeast added will mean a stronger fermentation?

        The yeast added quick fermented enzyme did not clean as well as the 3 months’ fermented enzymes…best is to be patient and wait for the enzymes to mature gradually and fully. :idea:

        I am not sure what apple project you were referring to. :oops:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  12. 42

    Richard said,

    Do “green products” really clean?

    • 43

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Richard :D

      Yes, this natural fruit enzyme does a fantastic job in cleaning. Last weekend, my daughter was using it to clean her bathroom – she sprayed on some diluted enzyme onto the walls/floors and she could see the dirt separating immediately and coming to the surface, even before she started scrubbing them.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  13. 44

    hoyoung yi said,

    Hi choesf.

    This article gave me a good impression,

    so I decide to translate it into koreans and write it in my blog(hoyoung2.blogspot.com).

    but the copy of above pictures need your allow.

    please email a your decision to me

    • 45

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Hoyoung Yi :D

      I’m glad you found this information useful and you will translate it into Korean at your blog. Of course, you have my permission to use the pictures. :wink:

      I’m not sure if you have read this post HERE, but we have a lot of good, interesting feedback at the comments section on the wonderful cleaning effects of this enzyme.

      Do have a lovely week!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  14. 46

    Richard said,

    I see your daughter sprayed this on her walls in her bathroom. Was that the painted walls? Did it harm the paint? Thank you!

    • 47

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Richard :D

      No, the walls in my bathroom are fully tiled.

      I did use a diluted enzyme-water solution (1:10 ratio) and used an old face towel to remove hand prints from the painted walls – the dirt and grime came off easily without affecting the paint. But the paints we used on our walls have the feature that allowed us to wipe of dirt occasionally.

      I think for anyone who wants to try using the enzyme to clean their painted walls, it is best to try it out in a little corner of the wall that is out of sight, just to be safe. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  15. 48

    MiniCooper said,

    Hi.. I read with much interests about this garbage enzyme thingy.. 1 question to ask is …when we use it as household cleaner, how much do we use ? For instances, mopping the floor, washing the dishes ( do we need to add some liquid washer to get some stud ?) and has anyone tried washing it on the car ?????

  16. 50

    Richard said,

    Thank you for the information!

  17. 52

    mustardseed said,

    hi, quick question: have you tried it on parquet? will it be too acidic for the wood? am using my very first batch for everything else and so far, it’s been great!

    • 53

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear mustardseed :D

      The steps of my stairs are made from parquet and I have been using the enzyme cleaner to mop them. However, my parquet has a layer of varnish/sealer which we had applied 5 years ago. Thus far, I’m not sure if the varnish has become thinner or not from the enzyme use. So, I think you may have to use it at your own risk. :oops:

      Good question you had asked there.

      But I know my parquet steps has a good shine to them these days. :lol:

      Happy Cleaning!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  18. 54

    [...] since I started using the miracle homemade fruit enzymes (READ HERE on how to make your own enzymes at almost zero costs) for all my household cleaning purpose, my [...]

  19. 55

    Guest said,

    Do you ever add Tea Tree Oil to make it stronger, or as a disinfectant?
    Thanks.

    • 56

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Guest :D

      No, I didn’t add any Tea Tree Oil…I think this oil costs quite a bit here in Malaysia. I kept to the original “recipe” to keep costs to a minimal for the cleaning enzyme.

      Do have a lovely weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  20. 57

    Hugh Lasenby said,

    Hi,
    Good reading as the wife just came back from Sibu where everyone is making the enzyme liquid. Fruit only for a better smell I’m told. I assumed it was vinegar (acetiic acid) formed with a wild yeast and the sugar. But if the container is covered it must rely on yeast already on the fruit I guess. When brewing beer, it’s always a worry that a wild yeast will take over and spoil the brew, so keep in mind that if you add yeast, you may end up with a fruit beer. To prevent excesive pressure, cover the top of the container with plastic film (glad wrap) and prick a small hole with a tooth pick. This allows enough gas to escape, although the glade wrap will still bloon up some what. Ready to start the first batch.
    Bye.

    • 58

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Hugh :D

      Thank you very much for your comments and helpful tips. :wink:

      Yes, the plastic cling film will work well, too. A few days ago, my puppy ran off with the cap of one of my juice bottles used to contain the enzyme and I just put a piece of plastic bag and tied a rubber band loosely over it. Your suggested “toothpick hole” is a great suggestion…I will go do just that now. :idea:

      Good Luck with your first batch of enzyme!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  21. 59

    ms said,

    Hi,

    I have more queries thus i hope you can share your experience. There are very little discussion on the use the the thick jelly-like layer and the white foamy substance during fermentation process. I heard that some use the jelly like material for sponging the body while bathing, while others have sliced layers off to make face mask. Even the foamy layer is used directly on the face as a facial cleanser. Has anyone tried using it and how is it done? i understand the liquid can be too concerntrated and need to be diluted down before use. How about the jelly and the foam?

    Sometimes, there are tiny little worms around the bottle. What does it mean? Is the enzyme still ‘clean’ or has it been contaminated? Please advice and looking forward to your answer.

    Thanks.

    • 60

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear ms :D

      You have posted some very interesting information and questions. Hope someone here can assist to answer them as well.

      Thus far, I have not heard anything about using the top jelly-like or foamy layer to use as a mask or for as a body scrub. Did you learn that from someone or it was a suggestion?

      Personally, I only use the very clean enzymes (those without formation of a layer of foam on the surface) to wash my face and neck area. If I see any foam or jelly stuff, I only use that for cleaning and doing laundry because I am scared of using that on me. :oops: :lol:

      So far, I don’t see any worms forming in my enzymes but as I am terrified of worms, I would have quickly thrown away that bottle of enzyme that has worms. :shock: I think the sugar content and later acidity would have killed the worms? I’m only guessing…..

      Do have a lovely week ahead!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 61

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello again, dear ms :D

        I’m sorry I forgot TgStar had commented at #12 at my post HERE that the jelly and foam can be uses as hair conditioner, facial mask and body scrub…. :oops:

        Wonder if anyone else have tried this way yet :?:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 62

        Gina said,

        I’ve never had and ‘jelly like’ stuff on top….I just caved in and strained my batch after testing in my bathtub and on a very dirty dish from breakfast. Maybe I need to wait longer next time. The full gallon plus I just strained out should last me long enough to be patient for 3 months on the next batch.

      • 63

        Hi there, dear Gina :D

        Yes, it is indeed difficult to wait for the first batch of enzyme to finish fermenting so that we can eagerly try it out! :lol:

        You were right – the best way to test out if the enzyme is ready to use and if it is working is to clean a dirty plate or bathtub….or to wash a really dirty car! :idea:

        The longer the enzyme is kept, the better its cleaning efficacy. I continue to make 1 quart or 1 gallon bottles of them as and when I gather my fruit scrapes and I intentionally keep a little of the older batches aside for use after a year or so. Older and really aged enzymes have such a rich bronze colour and they smell so good…almost like raisin wine. :wink:

        Have fun using your enzymes!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  22. 64

    anna said,

    Most of the enzymes I made contain worms up to 2.5 months. Is it normal?
    I find those made in transparent bottle contain no worms.
    Pls feed back

    • 65

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear anna :D

      Oh dear, yours had worms, too? Thus far, mine has no worms, thank goodness..because I am terrified of worms! :oops: :lol:

      Perhaps, the other visitors can comment if they ever had worms in their enzymes. May I know what scraps did you use to prepare your enzymes :?:

      I have used peels of lemons, oranges, apples, dragon fruit, pineapple, and even vegetables like cabbage and ladies fingers. I washed them cleanly first, used whatever I need out of them (like juices, drinking enzymes, etc) before I make cleaning enzymes. I am guessing that the worms came from some sort of meat contamination or there was not enough sugar to kill the worms? Hope someone else here may have the answers to your questions… :oops:

      For the enzyme containers, I have used old juice bottles, mineral water bottles and even an old plastic pail. These days, I will pour the matured enzyme sludge (the heavy stuff that floats to the bottom of the bottle, leaving a clearer yellow liquid at the upper layer) into a newly prepared cleaning enzyme to hasten the fermentation process down to one month. Also, I thought the sludge is also matures enzyme and it would help to kill bacteria (and any worms?).

      Thank you for sharing your enzyme experience here…we are all learning from this. :wink:

      Do have a lovely day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  23. 66

    john said,

    This is a great idea, I really need to try this. It’s actually very similar to a flavored vodka recipe I followed last week!

    • 67

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear John :D

      Thank you for your comments. That’s a very interesting napkin folding site you’ve got there. What did you put in your vodka to flavour it and how long does it take for vodka to be ready for drinking? I have a batch of homemade raisin wine which is about 5 weeks into fermentation and ready for harvest beginning of January 2010. :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  24. 68

    anna said,

    Read a few articles regarding worms in the enzyme after 3 weeks to 2.5 months. Yes the worms will resolve eventually. Meaning more protein in your enzyme and fertiliser.
    Just add some brown sugar if you want the worms to die quickly.

    • 69

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Thank you, dear Anna, for your feedback on how to deal with worms in the enzymes. Yes, that would mean more protein in the enzymes, good as fertiliser. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  25. 70

    Jeanie said,

    My first batch of citrus enzyme cleaner will be done an a couple of weeks, though I just opened the first container and used some today to clean the kitchen floor and also the bathroom tile walls. I am happy about how clean they became. I have 6 other containers started. I have a couple of questions. I find that the square 1 ltr containers with widemouth lids I used for making the enzyme have less bubbles and less air when I open them. The two tall juice containers I used, have more bubbles and more air when I turn the lids. Does the type of container used make a difference? I only drink fresh pressed juice, so didn’t have juice containers. but have a LOT of citrus scraps. My next question is, do you save the scraps in a jar in the frig untill you have enough, or do you add more water an sugar in a single container until it is full? Which is the best size to use?
    Jeanie

    • 71

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Jeanie :D

      I’m glad your enzymes are giving you great results in cleaning, too! :D

      I’m not sure why some bottles produce different levels of gas buildup in the enzymes :oops: … perhaps, it could be due to the materials of the containers? I don’t have as much fruit scraps as you and so I usually made mine into enzymes immediately. Perhaps, you may like to just place the scraps into a large container and then add more water and sugar accordingly? This way, you don’t have to put the scraps into the fridge. For the containers, ideally there should be enough space in it to allow the enzyme to ferment. Personally, I prefer to use larger containers (I have used a large pail/bucket once and wrapped it with a thick piece of plastic)….to save space and easier to harvest at one go. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  26. 72

    Brenda said,

    I have been So So excited to make this!! I went and bought my lemons and Grapefruits. I was thinking of putting the peeling through a food processor and maybe it would ferment quicker? Well anyway..Today is the day! I am most looking forward to the info I read on fleas. How it kills them dead. Also Ants… Also.. OK… EVERTHING! IT DOES. I AM SO EXCITED I HOPE I CAN WAIT 3 MONTHS. Oh man, I can’t wait to spray it on that green slime outside on the sidewalk. Mold. I have some colored very nice towels that always smell musty too. I have tryed hot water, color safe bleach, maybe this will work. hmmm what about yellow underarm stains on men’s t-shirts?

    • 73

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Brenda :D

      Wow, your enthusiasm on making enzymes is so great, I am almost jumping up and down with joy when I read your comments! :lol:

      Your lemon and grapefruit cleaning enzyme will smell fantastic. So far, I only like the smell of citrus enzymes…the other types tend to smell a bit more like “garbage” after 4 months or so. Cutting the peels into smaller pieces helps to quicken fermentation and improve the enzyme somewhat. These day, I put my fruit peels, brown sugar and some water into a blender…and then add in the relevant amount of water. :idea:

      You will be amazed the first time you use the enzymes for cleaning, just like those of us here did! Thus far, no one has reported anything on removing yellow underarm stains on men’s t-shirts…..hope you can give it a try and let us know the results here. :wink:

      Removing Blood Stains

      I know the enzymes work very well in removing the blood stains on the panties caused by menstruation “accidents”.

      Do have a lovely Sunday!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      P.S. Do read my post HERE on how to shorten the fermentation time of the enzymes. I think it will be good to make a variety of enzymes using the the shortcut method and the standard 3 months wait. Be sure to read the comments at the bottom as there are some risks of explosion due to the quicker fermentation and the cleaning results of the shortcut enzymes. :D

  27. 74

    SK said,

    Dear Brenda

    I put the enzyme on the panties for ‘accident’ cases and soaked in the pail of water for few days together with my towel contained hair dyes. A case of forgotten laundry. Hahaha. Amazed that when I need to wash it, the clothes did not smell as you might find in most of the cases and the dye mark still faintly visible. Might try to use it to soak my white color laundry in the future.

    Regards – SK

  28. 75

    [...] than one,,,,,,,,one led to another. Pay close attention to ferment times. Wonder cleaner Recipe For Homemade Citrus Enzyme Cleaner – Natural, Really Cheap (Almost Free) & Effectiv… How to Make Garbage Enzymes | My Smart Money Tips How to Make a Fruit Enzyme | eHow.com Easy [...]

  29. 76

    Joyce said,

    Hi,
    The 1st mth as mention, i need to open the cover and release the gas then how long can i close back the cover. Immediately or ?

    So when is the 2nd gas release ?

    • 77

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Joyce :D

      During the first 2 weeks of fermenting the cleaning enzyme, there tend to be more gas buildup than later. The amount of the gas depends on the amount of sugar and type of fruit peels. I would open the cover to release any gas almost on a daily basis just to be sure. When you hear that the gas sound is getting weaker and weaker as the days go by, then you can reduce the number of times to release the gas. These days, I usually leave the bottle covers half screwed in, leaving a space for any gas to escape and I need not check on the gas often. Only thing is be sure to leave about 1/4 empty space in the bottle as the liquid may bubble out. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  30. 78

    Jeanie said,

    I have been making the enzymes for about 6 months now and I have a question. When I use the 2 ltr juice container with screw lids, there seems to be not much gas if at all. When I use milk cartons, either 2 qt or gallon, there is more release, and there also appears to be more air space at the top over time. There is no leakage from the container itself. I am using only citrus peels as a material (well, also brown sugar and water)

    Another question is the 1,3,10 ratio by volume or weight? Is there a major difference if the formula is not adheared to with the fruit being more on the heavy side?

    Thank, Jeanie

    • 79

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Jeanie :D

      It is indeed strange how milk cartons can cause more gas buildup….so far, I only use juice bottles because my family do not drink that much milk. :lol:

      The ratio 1 : 3 : 10 ….that is the metric weight for sugar to vegetables/fruit peels in weight, and in metric liquid volume for water. These days, I don’t measure my ingredients anymore and I just estimated them. :oops: But so far, my enzymes seem to work just as well and so, I think that is okay. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 80

        Jeanie said,

        I wonder if the gas buildup issue is due to the thickness of plastic. I do not drink milk at all, bur have plenty of friends and family who do, so I am not at a loss for containers at all.

        Another question. I am picking up a case of organic oranges today, and after juicing, will of course be making enzymes. I would like to make this batch of enzymes for human consumption. Do I use the same process? Same formula and everything? Any thought on the plastic leaching into the mix? Thank-you so much for your input.

      • 81

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, dear Jeanie :D

        Sorry, I had thought you drank so much milk…:oops: I’m glad you can get many containers to make the cleaning enzymes.

        For drinking enzymes, the method is different from making cleaning enzymes. READ HERE for my post on making dragon fruit enzymes…you can substitute with your organic oranges. Wow, lucky you to get a box of organic oranges! :D

        I’m not sure if you can get those slabs of brown sugar but you can use honey or loose brown sugar, too, to make the drinking enzymes.

        Be sure to use only glass or ceramic containers to make the drinking enzymes, for fear that the plastic may leach into the mix.

        Have fun making your drinking enzymes! :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D:

  31. 82

    John said,

    Hi Choesf!

    The citrus recipes have been coming along since December 17th. I made two batches, each of them 1/2 filling a gallon container, both with the peelings from 8 oranges. I blended two of the peelings from one batch, then 2 weeks ago blended the rest of it and poured it back in. The other batch still has the full peelings.

    Both of the batches have a sour or off smell, one with the peelings smelling not quite as bad. Is this right? Should I add more sugar or something?

    That is interesting the floors get up more dirt the 3rd day! I blended orange peelings with water a few times and used the mix directly to clean the concrete floor. I brushed it in and then squeegeed it off. It worked great! I have routinely always tossed orange peelings down the disposal, which has helped to keep it in good order and clean. I am looking forward to using the enzyme cleaner for many things when it’s ready!

    • 83

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear John :D

      Yes, the citrus enzymes, although fruity, can have an off smell..like an orange that has gone bad. My husband thinks the enzyme still smells like garbage! :lol:

      A chemical engineer once described to me how the dirt molecules/particles get off the floor when we use enzymes. On the first day, the enzyme gets rid of the top layer of old dirt on the floor. On the second day, the enzyme permeates into the dirt and loosens the molecules. upon the third mopping the next day, the water in the mop pail is extremely dirty because more dirt molecules are being picked up by the mop. :idea:

      Now that I have use the enzymes to mop my floors for the past 6 months or so, my floors look so shiny and almost like brand new and I don’t have to mop my floors everyday…the floors remain squeaky clean and shiny for a longer period of time compared to the days when I was using commercial, chemical floor washes. Now, I only need to mop twice a week.

      I’m not sure if adding more sugar will make the fermentation smell better….but you can try and let me know. :wink: :lol:

      Did you follow the discussions that some of us had in trying out the enzymes in different ways like washing car, as a facial cleanser/toner, as fertiliser, etc…. at my post HERE :?:

      Have fun seeing what your citrus enzymes can do for you! I just used a lot of it yesterday to wipe my walls (diluted 1/4 cup enzyme to 1 small pail of water – for tough stains like finger prints, I used a stronger mix). at home.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 84

        John said,

        Hello Choesf!

        You are always so helpful, so wonder so many people like your blog!

        > I’m not sure if adding more sugar will make the fermentation smell better….but you can try and let me know. :wink: :lol:

        As long as it works well, that is what counts! :D

        > Did you follow the discussions that some of us had in trying out the enzymes in different ways like washing car, as a facial cleanser/toner, as fertiliser, etc…. at my post HERE :?:

        I read a lot of that, yes very interesting, but must have missed something. What is the difference between the drinking enzymes and the washing enzymes? Is it that you use the fruit instead of peelings for the brew? Is the smell better using fruit? Do you use the same proportions to prepare? Thanks very much! :-)

      • 85

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, dear John :D

        Finally! I just finished making my second batch of Kimchi – this time, I followed your style a little – I added cukes and cukes! :lol: But my daughter refused to let me add mango, she said it sounds yucky. :roll: I thought with the hot and humid weather coming up, it is good to have some Kimchi to whet our appetites during mealtimes.

        Yes, drinking enzymes are a lot more different than cleaning enzymes. You can read more about drinking enzymes in my post HERE. I stopped making enzymes to drink to test out the Miracle Vegetable Soup. A word of warning – my husband and my children all hated drinking the enzyme (diluted with water)! :lol: But they confirmed that drinking enzymes gave them more vitality, better complexion and my teenaged children’s acne all went away. But the moment we stopped drinking the enzyme, their acne came back a little until they started drinking the vegetable soup, and their acne went off again. :roll:

        Oh, thank you for you compliments there! :oops: I have to go now to cook dinner… :lol:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

        P.S. I forgot to mention that you have a great tip there in hastening the fermentation time of Kimchi, just leave it out at room temperature for another day, right? Thanks! I will do just that … my daughter and I will probably sneak a taste or 2 of the Kimchi afterwards…too impatient to wait! :lol:

  32. 86

    keatkat said,

    Dear Chosef
    Thanks for all the info on the enzyme. i find them very useful and very excited to try making some myself. can i use rotting fruits like chinese pears to make the enzyme. i will remove the rotting flesh of course.

    • 87

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear keatkat :D

      I’m glad you are trying out the cleaning fruit enzymes – you will have fun using it to clean your home. Yes, you can use those fruits that have rotted and not suitable for consumption anymore (not sure about bananas, though). :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  33. 88

    Pete said,

    Dear happyhomemaker88,

    Thanks for sharing all the experience. It’s good to know someone cares for our environment.

    I’ve read most folks follows the standard recipe of 1 ratio of brown sugar to 3 parts of garbage & 10 parts of water.

    Can anyone share that they had tried 1:>3:10 ratio? will it make the enzyme more concentrated/effective ?

    Thanks

    • 89

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Pete :D

      Yes, that is the ratio that I am following here to make the cleaning enzyme. What was given in the instructions I got initially was 1 kg of brown sugar, 3 kgs of fruit peels/scraps and 10 litres of water…1 : 3 : 10. So far, this combination has worked very well but we have to dilute the enzyme before using it for cleaning purposes.

      The amount of dilution to be done depends on the cleaning job on hand and your personal preferences. :wink:

      Hope the information help…

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  34. 90

    Tahnesha said,

    Hi there!

    I came across your blog after doing some research on homemade cleaning recipes, and I must say, I am very excited to try this cleaner out!!

    My only question is, I live in America and I’d like to know what the measurements would be in cups, tablespoons or quarts? We don’t really do the metric measurements here… :)

    THANKS SO MUCH!!

    • 91

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Tahnesha :D

      Here, I had followed just 1/10 of the original “recipe”…as I didn’t have a large enough plastic container.

      The basic ratio to use is 1 : 3 : 10 ….. 1 part brown sugar, 3 parts fruit peels or scraps, and 10 parts water

      In USA measurements for the original recipe – 2.2 pounds brown sugar, 6.6 pounds fruit peels/scraps and 2 gallons 5.13 pints water

      I’m sure you will enjoy using the enzyme cleaner when it is ready! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  35. 92

    tootsie roll :) said,

    this enzyme cleanser was amazing!! :) its like.. i can use it all around my house.. and you know what my house smells so good..
    i will never stop using this cleanser.. :]

    • 93

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear tootsie roll :D

      Thank you for sharing your experience here. Yes, it’s really amazing how well the enzyme cleans, right? I, too, have been using the enzyme cleaner for almost everything. It has made my Chinese New Year housecleaning really easy and effortless. :D

      I even made my own “wood polish” using enzyme….I took some photos, and I shall blog about it soon. My teak wood and wooden window frames now look so good.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  36. 94

    Mgnon said,

    Despite all the glowing reviews I was skeptical of this cleaner at first, but now that I’ve been using it for about a month to clean up after my five ferrets (and other things), I’m really convinced that this is way better and more effective than any commercial enzyme cleaner I’ve ever bought. I’m not sure why, but it is. For example, a few weeks ago I discovered that ferrets had been pooping in a forbidden and unseen part of my closet (really bad smell and dark yellow stain on the carpet!). First I wet vacuumed it with a baking soda and vinegar solution, rinsed it, then I poured on a liberal amount of homemade half and half orange peel enzyme solution/water and covered it with a plastic bag and weighted it for 24 hours. When I came back and took the plastic off, the carpet looked and smelled great. Absolutely no bad smell in the area and no stain, and the carpet was dry and even felt a little bit softer and more conditioned. Also, the ferrets sometimes venture into the closet but I’ve seen no more traces of poop in there so far.

    Here is a weird observation. Whenever I would use the same enzyme water solution to clean up certain ferret messes on the carpet (I have white berber carpet in my apartment) without covering for 24 hours, the solution itself would leave a dark yellow stain. The mixed solution is the same color as pee, so obviously it would leave a stain that looks like pee. To remedy this I am trying fermenting with white sugar so that hopefully the solution will be more transparent.

    • 95

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Mgnon :D

      Thank you for sharing your experience with the enzyme cleaner. Yes, many people who have read the glowing reviews of the homemade enzyme cleaner were sceptical with it at first. Only those who have personally used it for cleaning had happily confirmed its wonderful cleaning powers. :wink:

      Due to the colour of the enzyme is just like pee, it will leave a stain on any white material. I’m not sure if using white sugar for fermentation would stop the colouration of the enzyme as I had noticed that no matter what fruit or vegetable we used to make the enzyme, the colour of the enzyme will end with with a pee colour. Even the dark red colours of dragon fruits or beetroot would be changed to pee colour.

      I am thinking you may have to use a little bleach (not too environmental friendly but…) to remove that stain on your carpet.

      Happy Cleaning with your enzyme! :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  37. 96

    yen said,

    Good afternoon to you, choesf

    Just a feedback from mum’s maid who asked her mom back home to try this fruit enzymes for her corn crops which were attacked by fruit flies and were destroyed.
    Of course, the first time round, her mom was sceptical about this and did not bother to make, then her corn crops were destroyed again by the flies.
    This time round, her mom made the enzymes (only limes) and using spray to lightly spray onto the corn crops. Wow, somehow the fruit flies were kept away perhaps by the smell and she is so happy that she can now harvest her corns.

    Thank you once again for sharing with us this lovely, wonderful MAGIC enzymes cleaner.

    do take care
    yen

    • 97

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear yen :D

      It’s good to see you here. Wow, what a fantastic feedback on the use of the fruit enzyme…thank you for sharing it here. I’m glad your mum’s maid’s family can now use their homemade enzyme as a natural pesticide and their corn crop was saved. Heheh, I think we have to rename this enzyme to “Magic Enzyme” already after hearing your story. :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      P.S. I have copied your comments to the other thread HERE.

  38. 98

    pohyenn said,

    i would like to try on making the enzyme clearner, roughly how many orange or lemon requred to get 300 gms of lemon and orange scrapes ?

    should i take the just ater juiced lemon or orange?

    is it the smaller piecies i cut the better and the fater the fermentation processes?

    thank you

    • 99

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear pohyenn :D

      Errr…I’m sorry I forgot how many oranges and lemon peels went into making that 300 gms :oops: … I think it was 3 fruits each? It depends on the size of the fruits and thickness of the skins. I used a weighing scale to measure.

      Yes, you used the fruits right after you have juiced them.

      I believe the smaller the pieces, the better the fermented enzyme – for convenience and practicality, I now use a blender to blend everything. This is very quick, easier to pour into bottles and the fermentation is better. When ready to harvest the enzymes for cleaning, the leftover sludge can be diluted with water and poured as fertiliser for plants. :wink:

      Good Luck with your enzyme making!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  39. 100

    Tech said,

    Hello – I’m trying to make my first batch. It’s been almost 1 month but I do not see any white foam on the surface. Is this normal? How would I know that my enzyme water is successful?

    • 101

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Tech :D:

      If you have followed closely the recipe for homemade cleaning enzyme, you will be successful in making the enzyme. Don’t worry, it is easy and straightforward and I don’t think we can go wrong much. The foam on top of the liquid depends on the fruit or vegie scraps as well as the kind of plastic bottles used. The ultimate test for a successful enzyme is to use it and see your cleaning results! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  40. 102

    Y.W. Phang said,

    Hi there, thanks for the guides! I’m now making apple and carrot enzymes, it has been more than a week now, it seems fermenting very well, however, I’ve found and removed 2 worms from inside so far, will that be ok? I suspect the worms have been in the fruits, and that I didn’t realize it during preparation? So far, I only found 2, I’m a bit worried, since it is fermenting very well without any black mould at all, I don’t wanna to give it up, what should I do???

    • 103

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear YW Phang :D

      Errr….so far, I have not seen any worms in my enzymes, and so, I’m afraid I not sure how to advise you. :oops: Personally, I am afraid of worms :oops: and I would have thrown the whole enzyme away if I had found any. :oops:

      I think someone here also found some worms and she threw hers away, too. Since yours is only a week old and it doesn’t cost much to prepare a fresh batch of enzyme, it may just be easier to make another batch and not have to worry if more worms will turn up in your current enzyme. Or, if you are brave enough, you can let your current enzyme continue fermenting and see how it goes. At the end of the fermentation period. the enzyme would be too strong for any worms to survive. :idea:

      Good Luck !

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  41. 104

    Share-share said,

    I have been making this ‘enzyme cleaner’ for more than a year. Not knowing what to do with the residual fruit skin, i usually blend it with overnight water and then store it in bottles. I would pour some of it into toilet bowl to prevent water-line from forming. Just this week, I used some of this paste to wipe a sink. Aiyoh, all the marks and stains came off, just like that! No brushing or scrubbing needed. What more could one ask for? Am blissfully clean and hygienic. Thanks for the best resource on the subject. Even the comments here have been a useful resource. That’s why I’m back to share my 2-sen worth of it.

    • 105

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Share-share :D

      Thank you so much for sharing your useful tips on what to do with the enzyme’s residual pulp/fruit skin. Heheh, that is not a 2-sen’s worth, but RM2’s worth of valuable information. :lol:

      I have so many bottles of enzyme pulp/sludge left and not enough plants to use the leftovers as fertiliser. Now, I shall do as you did – use the enzyme paste as a concentrated, powerful, environmental friendly cleaner. :idea:

      Do have a wonderful week ahead!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  42. 106

    msm said,

    This sounds really interesting, and I’m going to try it. Recently I got rid of all my chemical cleaners, and am using all natural. It’s hard to find really powerful alternatives. I thought I read someones comment on your blog about taking it out of the fridge?? I’m assuming that you’re supposed to keep it at room temperature for the fermentation process? Does light or no light make a difference? After the fermenting period do you just store it in the same type of container, and does it continue to ferment..get stronger? Thanks!

    • 107

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear msm :D

      Yes, the fermentation and storage are both at room temperature. I think the fridge part mentioned is for those who are collecting fruit or vegetable peels to prepare their enzyme. I just store my enzymes in the same containers and keep some in smaller squeeze bottles for my cleaning jobs. I still have about 3 litres of 10 months old enzyme and I noticed that their cleaning power is indeed stronger than before. :D

      Have fun making your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  43. 108

    Foong said,

    我做的番茄酵素有发霉的味道,请问可以喝吗?

    • 109

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Foong :D

      I’m sorry I can’t read Chinese :oops: I did a Google Translate and I got this :-

      I do tomato enzyme is musty, will be drunk?

      Perhaps, you can post in English for me, please? :wink:

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 110

        Foong said,

        The translated is correct.
        Sorry about that & thanks for your reply

      • 111

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        That’s okay, dear Foong, no need to apologise there. :wink:

        If I get you correctly, do you mean to say that your tomato enzyme made for drinking smells musty and is it safe to drink? Personally, if it smells weird, I don’t think I will dare to drink it. But don’t waste this enzyme – you can add water and sugar accordingly and let it ferment for 3 months to turn it into a cleaning enzyme. :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  44. 112

    Lulu Tanaka said,

    Hello Choesf and everybody,

    I use a concentrated one for insect bite, and a diluted for hair rinse ( i read it here so i tried it) I have a problem with dandruff, I use almost all kind of shampoo and rinse but in a weeks time the dandruff will come back again, now i can use any kind of shampoo and a diluted enzyme for rinse.
    for insect bite, a concentrated one is ok for me, and no marks left.

    lulu

    • 113

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Lulu :D

      Thank you for your wonderful feedback on using the enzymes for insect bites and as a shampoo/rinse for hair. I have used the enzyme for skin burns but not on insect bites before. I told my daughter what you said for insect bites – she often get marks from mosquito bites and she used up a lot of cream prescribed by the doctor. So this will be good for her. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 114

        Lulu Tanaka said,

        Hello Choesf,

        Right now I am trying to use the remains of fruit skin, (mine is like paste already) mix with salt and rub on my legs and arms, I will write again the results.
        I used this mixture after kitchen chores, rub on my hands and there won’t be any unadorable smell left, I don’t use now any hand cream.

        Always

        lulu

      • 115

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, dear Lulu :D

        That’s a very good tip – mixing the enzyme pulp with salt and using that as a scrub. I bet you will end up with soft skin.

        Ah, with your feedback, I will now spray some enzyme on my hands after I have cleaned fish! :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 116

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello again, dear Lulu :D

        Whoooo…hoooo! Finally, I got something planted! :lol: :lol: :lol:

        Actually, it was my youngest son that sowed the carrot and daikon leaves seeds that you gave me. I told him it is his pet project and he was excited also to plant our very first organic vegetables. Actually, I was very scared to start the planting as I don’t have the green thumb and what vege I had planted previously didn’t last long! :oops: With your encouragement, I’m sure I will be successful this time round. :D

        Tomorrow, I will get my youngest daughter to plant your tomato seeds as she just loves eating tomatoes! So, the tomato plants will be taken care of by her. I will plant the chamomile and lavender seeds tomorrow, too…I hope they can grow in our hot weather. Then, I will start another pot of carrots and radish leaves next week – I read on the Internet that we can mix the carrot and radish seeds together as the radish leaves can be harvested just in time when the carrots are germinated. As I don’t have much space in my garden and I am using large pots, I thought this is like “killing 2 birds with 1 stone”.

        Now, I have to wait and see if I get any pests/bugs or worms and I hope I don’t get any worms….because I am terrified of worms! I will run away quickly when I see worms! :oops: :lol: :lol: That’s another reason why I get my children to plant the vege with me…in case there are worms, they will get rid of them for me! :wink:

        Thanks to you, my new hobby, i .e. planting organic vegetables, has taken off! :lol:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  45. 118

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    Hi there, dear friends :D

    I came across a “recipe” HERE for making a homemade pesticide to get rid of plant pests such as mealy bugs, etc. Thought you may be interested in it as well. :wink:

    Homemade Pesticide

    1 drop liquid dish detergent
    2 tsp enzyme cleaner (aka garbage enzyme)
    2 bird’s eye chili (cili padi)
    200 ml water

    Method :-

    Mix all ingredients in a spray bottle and let stand for 10 minutes, to allow the “spiciness” of the chili to be well infused into the liquid. Spray as pesticide onto leaves and stems of plants. :idea:

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  46. 119

    Wee Chuang said,

    Hi,

    I am a Singaporean living in Japan. Everything is so expensive here including detergent. I was really impressed by your innovative way of making this DIY cleaner and had just made a bottle according to the recipe. I used a 1.5L bottle and realized that the empty space on top is probably 5cm to the cap. Can you suggest the interval days to open the cap to release the air? You suggested to open the cap 1mth later.

    • 120

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Wee Chuang :D

      Thank you for your kind comments. I’m afraid I didn’t invent this “recipe” but had followed it along from the newspaper article mentioned above and from friends’ experiences. :oops: :lol:

      I’m really glad you are trying this out and it can save you a lot of money in terms of cleaning supplies, fertilisers and even insect repellents (this enzyme is very good for repelling cockroaches, from my experience, too. I no longer have ants and cockroaches coming to my home at all :D )

      Since I posted this article here, I have since modified the method of avoiding gas build-ups and mini explosions – just leave the cap loosely covered and check on it as often as you can. If you see any whitish stuff growing on the surface of the liquid, just tighten the cap and give the bottle a gentle shake to mix the whitish stuff into the liquid. It is a sign of fermentation in process and is actually some good, mouldy stuff. :idea:

      Good Luck with your enzyme and have fun cleaning with it later! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 121

        Wee Chuang said,

        Hi choesf,

        The bottle has some dent at the side, bottom has became rounded and worst, the wall of the bottle became so thin that it burst ….. This bottle that I used was manned to contain bleach…
        Anyway, I have made another bottle using a 1.8L mineral bottle.. Hope it works..

        Regards
        Wee Chuang

      • 122

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, dear Wee Chuang :D

        Thank you for giving your valuable feedback here. Now we know we can’t use bleach containers to make enzymes. :idea:

        I’m sorry to hear that your bottle exploded. Heheh, some of use, myself included, had experienced the explosions which caused big splatters of liquid and fruit pulp all over the ceiling, walls and floors. :roll: :lol:

        Yes, the mineral bottles should work – I have used those for the past year – right now, I have 3 5 L mineral bottles with enzymes fermenting away. Remember to leave the bottle cap loosely closed, okay? :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  47. 123

    Haydee said,

    Hi again

    I just managed to get a very small bottle of enzyme fermenting and I have a few questions I hope you can help me with.
    1) Does the enzyme have to be made with only the skins, or can I just chop the whole fruit up and add it?
    2) Does it matter if the fermenting juices get mixed often and the gas released every few minutes? I can’t seem to get my kids away from shaking the bottle and opening it to report whether they heard a hiss or not! My husband is just as ‘bad’ as the kids and opens the lid everytime he walks past! Will this affect the whole process?
    Many thanks for taking the time to answer all these questions!

    • 124

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Haydee :D

      I’m glad you are trying out this enzyme. Heheh, your husband and kids are really curious about the fermentation process. :lol:

      Yes, you can use the fruit, too, in addition to the skins. I have used whole apples (chopped up) that had been kept too long in my fridge. Also, old carrots. I even used a whole, forgotten cabbage – the fermentation process went well.

      Yes, the enzyme can be shaken and stirred (I had done that, too, when I had a large plastic bucket of enzyme fermenting last year – out of curiousity to see how the fruit scraps and enzymes were doing). Actually, this process helps to keep the top layer of the enzyme moist and prevent whitish, mouldy stuff from growing on the surface.

      I have some strange observations to report – I made two large bottles of enzymes with the same ingredients and both are shaken at the same time whenever I felt like it. Strangely, one bottle developed mould on the surface, whilst the other bottle didn’t. I’m wondering why. :lol:

      Have fun with using enzymes when they are ready! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  48. 125

    June said,

    Hi….I had stumbled onto your blog. Its fantastic reading! Was reading a little about ur enzyms making. I am curious to try your recipe, but I have a question. Can we use glass bottles or containers?? or it has to be plastic?
    Am quite excited to try :)

    Thanks

    June

    • 126

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear June :D

      I’m glad you are going to try making your own enzyme for cleaning. You will surely be happy with its multi-purpose usage. :idea:

      I am not sure why glass bottles or containers are not recommended but I am guessing it is as a safety precaution just in case the gas buildup is too great during the fermentation process and the bottle explodes?

      However, I think you can use a glass container and cover it loosely with clingfilm (with some holes poked to let gas out) or tie a piece of clingfilm to the mouth of the glass container. Or if there is a cover, just put it loosely over the mouth of the container. :idea:

      During the fermentation process, if there is an opening in the container used, it attracts a lot of little bugs/insects/flies.

      Have fun preparing and using the enzyme! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  49. 127

    June said,

    Hi! :)

    Thank you for your quick response! I hope my attempt works n no explosion occurs in my home. ;)

    Hmm…will have to go hunt down some form of container.

    Thanks heaps!

    June ;)

    • 128

      mustardseed said,

      june,

      what works for me are the 5 liter water bottles, you can go to any recycling center and ask for some(or places where they do recycling on sundays, like ss2)
      plastic bottles allow for the gasses to expand and in case you forget to release the gases it will not ‘explode’.
      another neat tip is to go to the wet market and get pineapple peels that are discarded by the tons!

      have fun!

      cw

      • 129

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Thank you for your very helpful information for June, dear cw. :wink:

        Do have a wonderful weekend!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  50. 130

    June said,

    hi guys….

    sorry for late reply.

    thks for the info of where to get some supplies…only problem is i don’t live in malaysia….so it may be a problem to get those pineapple peels n heading to ss2. I have a 1.5 ltr plastic bottle :) yay! as not so easy to hunt down large plastic containers.

    now i just gotta get some fruits to get goin! :)

    thks again ;)

    • 131

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear June :D

      It is okay to use the 1.5 litre plastic bottle, just reduce the amount of the ingredients a bit to give it some space in the bottle just in case there are bubbles forming and to prevent any overflow. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  51. 132

    Bhavani said,

    Hi Choesf

    Well today is 3 months! My first batch of enzyme cleaner….yeah!!! There is a slight fermented smell – guessing that’s normal? My interests for using this was to work with it in skin care. Do you have any suggestions? Can it be used full strength? I tested the pH and it was 3.5, which makes for a good exfoliating pH. Do you have any testimonials from anyone using it on their skin? Thanks again for starting this blog, it’s such a great contribution to natural living.

    All the Best,
    Bhavani

    • 133

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Bhavani :D

      Wow, time flies and your enzymes have matured after 3 months already! :D

      Yes, the fermented smell is normal. I have used the enzyme in 2 ways –

      1) mixed it full strength with my usual facial cleanser and washed my face with the combo. This method was taught to me by my air-cond technician whose wife uses the enzyme to wash her face for a long time already – with good results

      2) after washing my face and while my face is still wet, I would rub about 1 tablespoon of full strength enzyme onto my face, leaving it on for a while before rinsing off the enzyme.

      Now that you mentioned the enzyme has a good exfoliating pH, I should use it more often as a gentle facial scrub and not have to buy anymore commercial facial scrubs.

      Another way is for you to try the enzyme on yourself and see how it goes for you. I’m just worried that some people may react differently to the enzyme. So far, I have positive feedback from people who have used the enzyme on their face or skin – complexion is smoother and softer, whilst the little warts at the neck areas are gone (this requires full strength enzyme) after a while. :idea:

      Good Luck with your enzymes for beauty purposes! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  52. 134

    Bhavani said,

    Thanks Dear Choesf for the helpful information. Yes, I agree about the concern about how others skin would react to the enzyme. Will do some experimenting for myself and see how it goes.

    Have a beautiful day!
    Bhavani

  53. 135

    Haydee said,

    Hi

    I have just been testing out my enzyme, I went for the cheaters version of speeding up the maturation with yeast. It really was fascinating to watch the whole process and the whole family really enjoyed it.After 2 weeks all the fruit had sunk to the bottom of the bottle and it was a yellow color. I made it with just lemon skins, I don’t really like the smell of the concentrated enzyme, but like it diluted. I may have harvested it too early, but I couldn’t wait any longer. I really admire all of you for waiting the 3 months on your first batch!!!! I guess I have a problem with delay of gratification.

    I have quite a few questions: Is it hit or miss with the dilution, is it better to dilute or is the most effective at full stength?
    Can it be used to remove limescale buildup around the taps and at what strenghth? Does it need to sit for a while?
    Have you found a difference in the cleaning effect depending on the fruit/ veggie you use?
    When you mop, do you use warm water?
    This is going to sound odd, but how do you mop your floors? ( just to give you a bit of background – I went from one country where cleaning help was cheap to a country where cleaning help is expensive, so now at 33 years old I am finding myself having to clean toilets, floors etc for the first time in my life. I am now researching how to clean, because I always find that my tiled floors are streaking- even with the eco enzyme which might not have matured enough?

    Has anyone had any experience of removing urine smell from matrass after a child accident at night?
    Sorry to bombard you with so many questions. I really appreciate all the time and effort you take to make this such a valuable resourcce!
    Regards

    Haydee

    • 136

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Haydee :D

      Wow, I’m glad you got to try out your enzyme. It is okay if it’s just 2 weeks old and it’s from the “cheater’s version” (heheh, I like your description). You can start using it and the enzyme will have better cleaning ability as it matures more.

      I do understand your situation in cleaning your home – I had 2 maids, and then down to 1 maid, and then it was just myself cleaning my home. :lol:

      Don’t worry, it is okay to ask many questions – we are all learning and sharing our experience here. :wink:

      Firstly, on your question on how to remove urine smell from mattresses, I have posted a solution to this some time back :-

      How To Remove Urine & Other Odours From Mattresses

      So far, I haven’t noticed whether enzymes made from certain fruits are more effective in cleaning :oops: But I was told by my friend that those made from pineapples clean and smell better.

      Different cleaning jobs will require different strengths of enzyme-water solutions to be used. For example :-

      1) mopping floors – if my floor is really dirty, then I would use about 1/2 cup of enzyme to 8 litres of water. Otherwise for the usual mopping on alternate days, I use only 1/4 cup of enzyme. There is no streaking or marks after mopping, but a good shine to the floor. Try to wring the mop as dry as possible and use those mops made from good water absorbent materials to prevent streaking. If the mop water gets really dirty before I finish mopping the areas I need, then I would just pour it away and use another batch of enzyme-water. :idea:

      I use cold (room temperature – I am in the tropics) water to mop and clean. I only mop the floor once and there is no second rinse/mop required. The leftover mop water can be poured onto your plants – they will thrive from the enzymes and grow really well. The enzymes can be used as fertiliser.:D

      2) for bathroom cleaning – I usually mix 1 cup of enzyme, 1/2 cup of dish detergent and 5 cups of water as a cleaning solution. I would use that to wet my bathroom shower stalls, floors, toilet bowl, sinks, taps first, all at one go. Then I would clean my sink first, followed by the toilet bowl. That would leave time for the enzyme to soften or loosen the stains to make them really easy to come off. I use a bristled brush. This works for me for the lime buildups around taps or shower areas – if the stains are persistent, you may need to use stronger enzyme or apply more enzyme-detergent-water again and let it sit a little longer. Then scrub again and rinse the areas off with water. The taps are shiny and look like new.

      I have noticed that my cleaning jobs are made much easier with the use of enzymes. The floors, bathrooms and even my cars (which I have used enzymes to clean) remain clean longer. Somehow, they don’t get dirty so fast anymore, as if the dirt don’t stay on that easily.

      Try and see if your enzyme will clean better when it has matured longer.

      Have fun cleaning with your enzymes! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 137

        Haydee said,

        hi Choesf

        You are amazing! Thanks so much for such a quick reply!
        I asked about whether the different fruits make a difference because I recently saw a natural insect repellant that was made from orange peels and the claim is that the d-limonene in the peel of the skin somehow attacks the respiratory system of the ants. I thought that maybe enzyme made with orange peel may be more effective insect repellant.

        Regards
        Haydee

      • 138

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, dear Haydee :D

        Oh, now I understand why you asked about the different fruit enzymes. So far, I have not heard anything about the different fruits being different as a natural insect repellent….but I know that the fruit enzymes that I have used so far are effective in repelling insects like ants and cockroaches. :wink:

        I have written a post earlier on using lemon grass extract as a natural pesticide – so, I think a lemon grass enzyme may work well, too. I have thrown some lemon grass stalks into my enzymes on some occasions as well.

        Natural Pesticide Made From Lemon Grass Extract

        Just now, I was at the Carrefour Hypermarket and I saw they have some whole pineapples for sale – so, I bought 2 ripe ones for just USD1 and I am going to chopped them up, skin and all, to make 2 5-litre plastic containers of enzymes. I will be using the sludge from my older enzymes to hasten their fermentation, and I will post about the cleaning efficiency of pineapple enzymes later when I try them out. :idea:

        Do have a wonderful week! :D

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  54. 139

    Bhavani said,

    Hi Choesf

    In regards to the pineapple enzyme which you said clean and smell better, do you use only the rind of the pineapple like with the lemons & oranges, or do you use the fruit part too?

    Have a Peaceful Day!
    Bhavani

    • 140

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Bhavani :D

      Regarding the pineapple enzyme, I have two 5-litre plastic bottles of pineapple enzyme fermenting away. According to my friend, she used just the skins only because she got them for free from those people that sell peeled and sliced fruits. I have another friend who bought a whole pineapple and used the whole thing as pineapples are very cheap at markets here in Malaysia – a pineapple can cost from US 30 cents to US 80 cents each.

      Actually, you can use the fruit parts, too, for the enzymes – it is just that the “recipe” calls for rinds and skins as a way for us to put fruit kitchen scraps to good use. The original name for the fruit enzyme is “garbage enzyme” and that name is still being used. I didn’t like that name and have called it “fruit cleaning enzyme”. :lol:

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  55. 141

    June said,

    Hi again :)

    Wow do i feel the pressure to catch up. Question time. Can I use apples? I tried to read most of ur comments but may hv missed it. If so, wot would be the recipe for it? just replace the one u did for lemon w apples?? Sorry if I sound rather blurry, but I’d rather be sure than sorry. :)

    Cheerios

    June :):)

    • 142

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear June :D

      Don’t worry, just ask away if you are not sure. :wink: Yes, we can use apples, too. Actually, any fruit or vegetables (scraps, peels, or the whole thing that has withered and not suitable for consumption) can be used for the enzyme (just no meat only). From my experience, I prefer to stick to fruits because the vegetable enzyme has a really weird, awful smell. Citrus fruits are the best to be used as their enzyme still smell good after a long time (I still have 1-year old lemon and dragon fruit peel enzyme). :D

      The recipe is the same – a ratio of 1 : 3 : 10 parts of brown sugar to fruits/vegetables to water. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 143

        June said,

        Hi Choesf

        Thanks again for the advice :) hmm…dun think I would just start with fruits…..

        I notice u mentioned brown sugar….is there a difference with any other sugar??

        Wow a whole year?? gosh..it must be fantastic to use! Nice! :):)

        Another question….I sometimes juice….presume I can use the pulp to the jar?
        :) June

      • 144

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, there June :D

        You are most welcome to any information I or the other visitors can give here. :wink:

        Yes, I have used the pulp, too, from fruit after juicing. At one time, I used apple pulp but I mixed that into my other regular fruit peels like lemon and orange. :idea:

        We can use brown sugar or jaggery or red sugar (some type of sugars that the Chinese use) but no white sugar as it is bleached.

        I now have 2 5-litre bottles of pineapple enzyme prepared – for some reason, the pineapples foamed a lot for the first week, more compared to the other fruits, despite the fact that the bottle caps were loosely closed and air could escape all the time. I hate to think what would happen if the cap were closed tightly – I probably would have a big mess to clean up after the explosion. :lol: Maybe it’s because I had used whole pineapples and the sugar content is higher. I noticed that enzymes which had the sludge of older enzymes added are “quieter”.

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  56. 145

    June said,

    Hi Choesf

    oops….i did not have brown sugar….so i made a batched y’day with icing sugar…..oh oh…guess i hv to throw it out now….bummer :(:(

    guess I was over eager…..oh well…guess i hv to add brown or raw sugar to my shoppin list. Assume all is organic?

    last nite I did an apple ginger batch…but it probably down the drain now as i used the wrong sugar :(

    oh well….put it to beginners blunder :)

    thks heaps again for helpin out. u r just the best! :)

    June

    • 146

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear June :D

      If you have not thrown away the apple ginger batch yet, why don’t you continue to keep it and see how the enzyme goes with white sugar? Maybe that will work as well? :idea: Then compare it to the one using brown sugar. My brown sugar wasn’t the organic type, just the regular one. :oops:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 147

        June said,

        Hey hey

        oops…..I had already thrown it away….eventhough it was just 24 hours old….gosh it smelt yummy, heh heh

        I made a carrot, apple and cucumber batch today w the brown sugar. Strangely it looks a lot thicker than my apple ginger one I threw away.

        On hindsight, I should have kept it…but i need the bottle as it was the only one i had that was over a liter.

        No problem bout not being organic, was just curious as I use all organic thus was wondering whether the enzymes were also made w organic products. At end day….dun think it makes much diff when they are made without harmful chemical and from natural products which is good enough :)

        I am sooooo excited eventho my other half was not impressed when he got home to see a murky like bottle in the pantry, hahahahahaha….so i dun think he is ready for the onslaught of bottles with different fruits n veg that may explode around our home :P

        I mite attempt another mini batch w the apple ginger as i loved the smell when i threw it out.

        another thing….we have to shake it daily rite? am bit worried as we will be goin on away thus there will be no one to shake em, will anything happen??

        cheers

        june

      • 148

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, dear June :D

        Heheh, my husband and children also will make funny faces whenever they see my bottles of rotting fruit scraps in my laundry room. But I always sing praises to them about how fantastic the enzymes are in cleaning and they are now impressed with the enzymes, too! :lol:

        The enzyme doesn’t need to be shaken everyday but the bottles need to be checked everyday for gas buildup. But if you have left the bottle cover loosely fastened, then there is no worry about explosions from gas buildup. I like to give the enzyme a good shake every day just to check how it is going and to wet the surface area so that it doesn’t get a yucky looking mould at the top. The shaking is optional. Sometimes, I forget to shake the bottle and the mould does grow, but another good shake of the bottle will get rid of the mould. :idea:

        Looking forward to hearing you have fun cleaning with your homemade enzymes! :D

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  57. 149

    yuki kure said,

    I made a batch of enzyme with the faster method of adding yeast to it. It did a lot with gas for the first few days but after that there is barely anything. I have left it alone for a month. Is the peelings suppose to decompose? The liquid inside looks about the same a transparent yellow color unless I shake the bottle then it becomes milky from some white stuff that collects on the bottom. Is it suppose to have that?
    When do I know if it is ready? Did I do it wrong? Should I just wait longer?

    • 150

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear yuki kure :D

      I’m glad you are trying out the enzyme. If you are following the faster method and it’s been a month already, you can start using the enzyme. After the usual 3 month method, the enzyme will have a clear, pale yellowish/brownish appearance. Seems like yours is the same, too. The sediments and milky stuff will sink to the bottom and the peelings “decomposed”. Try your enzyme now and see how it works in cleaning for you. :wink:

      Have fun with your enzyme! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  58. 151

    Junelle M said,

    Came across this site tonight because I’m seeking an enzyme cleaner to use on pet urine on carpets. My carpet is kelly green so I don’t want to bleach it, nor do I want to put something on it that will stain it. Any idea of what fruit/sugar I could use to do carpets?

    • 152

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Junelle M :D

      I’m afraid I don’t have any experience in cleaning carpets . :oops: However, there has been feedback here that the enzyme can make some cloth colour run. So, I am not entirely sure that the enzyme may not bleach your carpet. But if you are willing to try using enzyme to clean the pee stain, any fruit enzyme will do the job. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  59. 153

    Haydee said,

    Hi Choesf

    I have so many questions/ thoughts, but I don’t expect you to answer them, I am just putting them here to get it off my brain.
    I would love to have a deeper understanding of what is actually going on, does the fermentation cause the fruit to decompose releasing the enzymes within the fruit into the water? What is the science/ biolgy behind what is happening?

    There are so many different kinds of enzymes within fruit, surely the different combinations yield different solutions with different potentials. I was reading the papino and pineapples contain proteases, the enzymes that digest proteins which is probably the reason that the pineapple cleaner works better. I know you mentioned that the fruit enzymes didn’t work so well to degrease your hob, and that rice enzyme does. I read that rice bran has lipases, the enzyme that digest fat , so that could be the reason that it works on grease. nuts, grains , avocados , olives also contain lipases- would they work in the fermentation ‘soup’ to add lipases to the cleaner?

    Would the drinking enzyme also work as a cleaner? ( not a cost effective one, but would the result be more concentrated?)

    I used the quickened version of the enzyme and am not sure that it worked so well, I cleaned a tile floor and it streaked badly. The place that I had the best luck was cleaning a garbage bin that was reallly dirty and had baking soda sprinked on the bottom. the enzyme mix with the soda made a paste that magically made the dirt disappear as I wiped it over the dustbin. I thought that maybe the ph has to be more alkaline for the enzymes to work better and that is why it worked well, or baking soda is just a good cleaner. I am going to have to experiment alot more, but this time I am waiting longer for my enzymes to mature.

    Thanks so much for your blog, you have got me interested in finding alternative ways to improve my health

    Haydee

    • 154

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Haydee :D

      Thank you for your helpful information on the “science” behind the enzymes of papino, pineapples and rice bran. From there we understand more on how the enzymes work. :wink:

      Here is an article with information on how the “garbage enzyme” came about :-

      http://vinnysreflections.blogspot.com/2009/05/questions-about-garbage-enzymes-and.html

      I have not tried the “Drinking Enzyme” as a cleaner as I thought that would be a very expensive cleaner indeed, and so, I don’t have any information on that. :oops:

      Someone here has mentioned that another method was to add some baking soda to the enzyme, I’m not sure why but I am guessing that the baking soda is to balance the acidity of the enzyme as well as to give it better cleaning properties. :idea:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 155

        Haydee said,

        thanks so much for the link, that was just what I was looking for. I see that I had it all wrong, its the bacteria and yeasts that produce the enzymes and not what is being released by the fruit. It was a bit discouraging though:)

      • 156

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, dear Haydee :D

        I believe the enzymes in the fruits you mentioned also play a role, too, in in becoming an effective organic cleaner that we can make ourselves at home. We are all learning and sharing our information here. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  60. 157

    ChloeTiong said,

    Will the garbage enzyme explode? how to avoid it?

    • 158

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Chloe :D

      Yes, the garbage enzyme will explode if the gas builds up too much in the bottle without regular release. A few ways to avoid that :-

      1) leave the bottle cap loosely fastened so that gas can escape slowly always

      2) if the step above is not followed, then check the bottle every day and feel it for any tension from gas buildup – when you use a plastic bottle, you can squeeze it to see if it is hard or soft to the yield.

      3) in case you had forgotten to leave the cap loose but had tightened it and there is a hard feel to the bottle, meaning that there surely will be an explosion ===> put a large plastic bag over the bottle (cover from top downwards). Slide your hand into the plastic bag, while your other hand is securing the opening of the plastic bag. Slowly twist open the cap – the explosion will be limited within the plastic bag and the enzyme stuff will not get everywhere onto the walls and ceilings. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  61. 160

    Sara said,

    I am just wondering if anyone has used this to
    clean that aweful mold off of thier grout lines? I just moved into a house and let’s just say the previous owner didn’t do such a great job of keeping the shower tiles/grout clean. I have used everything I can think of with little or not result. Anyway I am very excited to start my own experiment with the enzymes :-)

    • 161

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Sara :D

      Yes, I have tried the enzyme on mouldy grout lines but it doesn’t work 100% in removing the blackish stuff. Maybe only 50%. I find using bleach undiluted works better. I just dabbed a little full strength bleach on those grout lines, leave for about 5 minutes before rinsing off with water and the grouting will be quite clean. :idea:

      Be sure that your bathrooms or kitchen is well ventilated and you wear rubber gloves. The bleach fumes can be quite poisonous when inhaled. Also, do not mix the bleach with other bathroom cleaning agents for fear of creating a lethal concoction of fumes. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  62. 162

    Sara said,

    Thanks for the quick response! I will have to try the bleach tip. I am so annoied by nasty looking grout, eventually we will re do the bathroom, just not in the budget yet. (Just finished the basement last week)

    A quick question: does it make any difference if you used dark or light brown sugar for making enzymes? I didn’t put much thought into it until now but, I’m sure the dark brown sugar will make a darker “finished product” . So other than that will it have any effect on my little enzymes? :-)

    • 163

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Sara :D

      You are right – the dark brown sugar will result in a darker enzyme. :wink: I am not to sure if there’s any difference in the enzymes’ cleaning properties but so far, I have used both the dark and light brown sugars for making enzymes with good cleaning effects. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  63. 164

    Jody said,

    This has been some interesting and wonderful reading. I am always looking for “greener” and cheaper in everything I do. This is wonderful. I made 3 batches this morning. I clean houses as a side job and look forward to using the enzymes for this as well.
    The question I have is does the water we use to make enzymes matter? City tap water with it’s chlorine and who knows what else? Or should I use filtered water? or even rain water, when possible, would be a good idea but not always feasible.
    Also, for doing your laundry….do you use the enzymes for every load? and what’s the ratio of enzymes to laundry soap/detergent?
    Does hydrogen peroxide, essential oils or anything else cause the enzymes to become ineffective?
    Thanks in advance for whatever answers you can give!

    • 165

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Jody :D

      I’m glad you are trying out the enzymes – they will surely help you in your cleaning jobs. :wink:

      I’m not sure if the type of water matters but I have been using filtered tap water. I think rain water may be better as it is not chlorinated but here in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the rain water would contain lots of pollutants.

      For laundry purposes, I used about 1/4 cup of full strength enzyme together with half the amount of my usual detergent that I would normally use. The towels ended up soft and no fabric softener is needed. However, these days, I have stopped using enzymes for laundry and I had gone back to using the commercial products because I prefer those to the enzymes.

      I think hydrogen peroxide will “kill” the enzymes as well as very hot water.

      Have fun using your enzymes for cleaning when they mature! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 166

        Jody said,

        Hi again and thanks for your response. May I ask what is it you did not like about using the enzymes for your laundry?
        I am making the rice water enzyme. It is getting very thick and slimy. Is it supposed to be? The other enzymes seem to be somewhat slimy too and I don’t remember anyone saying anything about that!
        Thanks again!

      • 167

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, dear Jody :D

        For my laundry, I still prefer the “fresh” smells produced when the commercial detergent and fabric softener are used. :wink:

        Both the rice water and fruit enzymes did not change in terms of their fluidity, i.e. they didn’t get thick and slimy. Yours is the first feedback on that. I’m afraid I don’t know why that happened to your enzymes. :oops: What type of containers did you use?

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  64. 168

    Sara said,

    Ahh, I am back again with another question :-) lol Have you had any success with removing CAT urine with the homemade enzymes? I’m afraid my cat has had an accent on a set of sheets and blanket (thankfully I had a matress pad cover down so it spared the matress). Anyways kitty has an appointment with vet to rule out any medical issues but in the mean time my OCD is kicking in with trying to remove the aweful smell :-( All other “home remidies” have failed me.

    Can’t wait for my 3 months of fermentation to be up so I can test these lil enzymes out and quit bombing you with so many questions! Thanks in advace for the response :-)

    • 169

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      It’s good to see you back, dear Sara! Don’t worry, just ask away any questions you may have here…we are all trying to help each other in our cleaning jobs using enzymes. :lol:

      I have 3 cats and I do so understand what you meant in the OCD making us crazy in removing those kitty “accidents” smells. One of my cats peed on my mattress many years ago, before I learned about the homemade cleaning enzymes. Fortunately, it was an old mattress and it has since being replaced with a new one. At that time, I used this method to remove the cat pee smell –

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2007/12/08/how-to-remove-urine-other-odours-from-mattresses/

      If your sheets and blanket can fit into your washing machine – add in about 1/2 cup of full strength enzyme plus half the usual amount of laundry detergent and set the cycle to a full wash, that may help to remove the urine smell. I have used this method to wash my bathroom floor mats which that same cat likes to pee on sometimes :roll: and the pee smell is gone after the wash. Remember to add on extra fabric softener to give them a good fragrance as the enzyme doesn’t smell very nice. :idea:

      I had also used the enzymes to clean effectively the floors at some corners where sometimes, my oldest cat likes to pee there. Leaving some diluted enzyme on the affected parts of the floor will remove the pee odour over time…but then, my cat would still like to go back there again.

      Good Luck! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  65. 170

    Sara said,

    Sorry to hear about kitty using your bath rugs as a potty. I had a male cat that did the same thing on every single rug I owned and he even managed to get the occasional sock that was forgotten on the bathroom floor. I’m so glad that is in the past!

    On a good note, I plan to try the powder tip tomorrow. I have a 14 month old son and would like to do this outside (during nap time) to keep my “little helper” from “helping” so much lol :-)

    Thanks again for the wonderful tips! I’m sure I will be back soon with another cleaning question :-D

    • 171

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Thank you, dear Sara, for letting me know that you male cat did the same thing to your rugs. I’m so glad that my kitty isn’t “weird”. :oops: :lol:

      Good Luck with your “powder” job to freshen your son’s mattress’ smells. :wink:

      Here’s another cleaning tip which I came up with last week :-

      You know how frustrating it can be when we accidentally get menstrual blood onto our bedsheets and we worry if we can get the stains off completely?

      Previously, I would to spray those commercial “stain removers” first before throwing the bedsheets into the washing machine, but I had never liked the smells of those sprays. So, I thought I would try using the enzyme as a blood stain remover instead.

      What I did was to mix 1/2 cup of concentrated enzyme with 2 tablespoons of my washing machine laundry detergent (I use Persil) in a container with 1 cup water. Mix them them up thoroughly and pour the solution slowly over the stained parts of the bedsheet. I then immediately put the bedsheet into the washing machine for a regular wash (with the usual detergent and fabric softener). :idea:

      Wow, my bedsheet came out really clean – the blood stains were 100% gone. I forgot to mention that the stains were really nasty and dried already to begin with. :oops:

      I’m sure this method can be used for removing the blood stains from our panties, too. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  66. 172

    Sara said,

    Man I can’t wait for my enzymes to be ready! I think I’m starting to get a little impatient! Lol

    Anyway another quick way I have found to clean the “monthly accident” is use regular peroxide. I have not used this on anything that was over 24 hrs old (I figure the stain was set by then and just simply didn’t bother) but it has not faded or ruined any of my undies. Just set undies in the sink and pour a little on the blood, let them sit for 30 min or so and throw in the wash :-)

    • 173

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Sara :D

      Yes, I can very well imagine your impatience in trying out your enzyme! :lol:

      I remember the first time I made mine, I couldn’t resist and I started using it by the second month already (well, as you can read at this post) :oops: :lol:

      The peroxide you mentioned, where do you buy that from? Is it like bleach?

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  67. 174

    Sara said,

    The peroxide will be with the first aid items in a brown bottle. It’s dirt cheap, usually less than a dollar. It’s used for cleaning cuts and scrapes to prevent infection, I wouldn’t think you would have any trouble finding it.

    Ok so today my cat peed all over my bed again, I am so angry at her! And the thought of enzymes are dancing in my head about the time I found this mess. I had 2 bottles of enzymes started, one the “regular” version and the other “cheater” version. I think it’s been about a month so I decided to give the cheater version a try. I just put it in a spray bottle with no dilution and sprayed the heck out of the urine spots. The sheets are in the wash now, the bed spread is outside because I want to keep my son from crawling on them. While I was out there I couldn’t resiest giving the bed spread a sniff and I am soooo pleased to tell you I can not smell and pee! Only the enzyme cleaner, which I have to admit smells like drinking alochol but anything is better than cat pee! I can’t wait to update you later on how everything smells once it has been washed and dried! I know you have said before that it works on cat urine, but it’s one of those things, I just have to see it to believe it! Lol I have a feeling I am going to be kicking myself in the butt later for spending all that money on commerical enzyme cleaners for pet stains in the past, and let me add, they DIDNT even work!

    Thanks a million for the tips again! :-D

  68. 175

    Sara said,

    Well I am back, without the horrible smell of cat urine in my house! I am thrilled with my enzymes! I seriously can’t thank you enough, who would have though something so simple and cheap would prove to be so effective on one of the worst smells in the world? YAY! Lol

    On another note, I got to thinking after I wrote the other post. The peroxide will be labeled “hydrogen peroxide” and it may be botteled differently since you live in Malaysia. It is a very common thing here in America, you can find it at most any store here. Either way I bet the enzymes will do an excellent job on those type of stains and you might as well use it since you already have that on hand! :-)

    • 176

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Sara :D

      Whooo…hoooo, I am so happy for you that you have successfully removed the terrible cat urine smells with the use of your homemade enzyme cleaner! :D

      I know, it is really irritating having to be “reminded” of the cat urine and accidents everytime we get a whiff of it. Stale cat pee is even worse…so I do understand your exhilaration in your success there. :lol:

      Thank you for letting me know about the hydrogen peroxide….I will go look out for that the next time I go to a supermarket just so I can know what it is. :wink:

      Have fun using your cleaning enzymes and think how much savings you will have from not buying commercial ones! :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  69. 177

    Danny Wong said,

    Dear happyhomemaker88,

    I’m Danny, Hi, how are you? Came across your enzyme recipe and find it very interesting. I notice that the fruit enzyme is usually consisted of orange peel or lemon peel, but no mention of the pulp.

    If I have the whole orange EXCEPT THE PEEL, do you think it can be used to make fruit enzyme? Be it a cleaner or a drink!

    • 178

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Danny :D

      Actually, we can use the whole fruit and any fruit – here, I had used fruit peels as they were leftover from juicing and it’s a way to being eco-friendly….heheh, nothing of the fruit is wasted. The “Citrus Enzyme” was the name I gave to this enzyme – the original name given to enzymes made in this manner using fruit and vegetable scraps from the kitchen is actually “Garbage Enzyme”. :wink:

      So, you can use the whole orange to make this cleaning enzyme. :idea:

      Please note that the recipe here is for making cleaning enzyme, the drinking one is here –

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/08/12/easy-homemade-dragon-fruit-health-enzyme-for-drinking-my-review-of-this-enzyme/

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  70. 179

    Sara said,

    Hello once again, Choesf! I am back again with another question. It took me a few days to gather up my fruit peels for the latest batch of enzymes, so in the mean time I kept the
    peels in the freezer. Now my enzymes have been started for about a week and I am not getting the gas build up as I did with previous batches. So long story short, did I mess things up by freezing my fruit peels?

    Thanks in advance for your response! :-D

    • 180

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Sara :D

      I, too, have some frozen citrus peels in my freezer which I had intended to make into cleaning enzymes. I’m not sure if freezing the peels would affect the gas buildup in any way or not. :oops: Come to think of it – I just realised that my 2 bottles of pineapple enzymes had different rates of gas buildup – I had added a little bit of frozen lemon peels together with the whole pineapples…so, you may have a point there. However, I don’t think freezing would affect the enzymes as the peels would also start to rot and the enzyme will ferment?

      I guess the only way to find out is to see how good the enzyme cleans when it matures. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 181

        Natalie said,

        I am super excited to make your enzyme recipe! Thank you for sharing and for all of the great tips. I was wondering – can I use the peel of pineapple that still has a bit of fruit still in it, or it is supposed to be the fruit? I know you are using the peel of citrus fruit, but pineapple has such a tough peel, I didn’t know if it was different. Thanks for any help!

      • 182

        Hi there, dear Natalie :D

        I’m glad you got all excited as well to try making some fruit enzymes for cleaning.

        Yes, you can use the peels of pineapple that just have a little fruit left in it. I use that, too. You can also mix the pineapple peels with other fruit peels that you may have, such as lemons, mandarin oranges, limes, etc.

        Some tips for everyone here :idea:

        1) enzymes made from fruit pulp leftover from juicing are harder and more messy to filter and use as the dry pulp will soak up more water. I made 2 large bottles of the “pulpy” enzymes and I have yet to harvest them as they are now 80% slush and 20% only liquid. Perhaps, they can be used to clean toilet bowls or clear kitchen sink pipes

        2) remember to use the slush leftover at the bottom of the bottles during harvest to start new batches of enzymes. The fermentation period can be cut down by half the time. You can see the fuits/peels sinking to the bottom and the liquid become a clear tea yellow colour after 1 month or so.

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 183

        Natalie said,

        Oh, that is a great tip about the pulp making it more of a pain to strain. I am going to be juicing some citrus today and will add those peels and I’ll be all set… to wait 3 months! Haha I am excited. I love your blog, and especially the feeling here, because of how nice you are. :)

      • 184

        Thank you for your compliments of my blog, dear Natalie :D:

        Here is another post on how to cut short the enzyme fermentation time :idea: – I understand that for some people, they are excited to use the enzyme and couldn’t wait the whole 3 months :lol:

        http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/09/18/shortcut-to-reduce-the-fermentation-time-of-your-fruit-cleaning-enzyme/

        When using the yeast, you have to be extra careful about the gas buildup in the bottle -due to the speedier fermentation there are more bubbles, so be sure to leave the cover on the bottle loosely screwed on so that gas can escape all the time :wink: .

        Have fun making and using your cleaning enzymes!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  71. 185

    Jeanie said,

    I did an experiment with oranges recently and want to share my findings. I used organic in one batch and conventionally grown in another. The organic was amazing in that it started fermenting almost immediately and finished sooner. The conventionally grown orange batch started slower and contiued longer. The results of the product were the same.

    • 186

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Jeanie :D

      Thank you for your feedback on using organic fruit peels versus the conventionally grown ones. Perhaps, it is due to the use of commercial pesticide that slowed down the fermentation process. It is indeed fascinating there that the end results were the same – i.e. they both cleaned just as well. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  72. 188

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    Good evening, dear friends :D

    The last batch of fruit enzyme that I made was from using 2 ripe pineapples that cost me RM0.99 or US0.30 each only. Two 5-litre plastic water containers were used. This week, I used some of the pineapple enzymes for cleaning and I have found some interesting results :-

    1) the pineapple enzyme smells really good, almost like new, with very little ‘fermented” or “rotting” smell like my citrus (lemon & orange) or dragonfruit enzymes. When I mopped my floors, the whole whole smelled subtly of pineapple! :D

    2) despite the pineapple enzyme being only 3 months old (I had added the sludge from old enzymes as well), it cleaned extremely well, almost like my 1-year old enzymes! My floors are so gleaming clean now that it’s such a joy to look at my polished floor tiles…heheh, you should see the grin that’s stuck on my face all day today! :lol:

    3) because of the nice smell, I prefer using pineapple enzyme to wash my fruits and vegetables as other fruit enzymes would give a slightly rotting smell.

    I had read earlier from other websites that pineapple enzymes cleaned better than others and that was why I decided to try it for myself and see. Anyway, I have always love pineapples, its taste and aroma – so, why not pineapple enzymes for cleaning. :wink:

    For some strange reason, my honey bottle got attacked by many black ants that came through my back door and into the kitchen. There was a long trail of ants from the door, along the floor, up the kitchen work surfaces and to the honeypot! :roll: Before this, there was no ants nor cockroaches in my house since I started using enzymes to clean my floor and kitchen countertops.

    So, I just used some full-strength pineapple enzyme and poured it along the floor at the back door…to block the ants from coming in, then wiped the same enzyme along the trail the ants took to reach the honey pot. I had to do this twice because this type of ants was rather persistent …it was as if they called in more “reinforcements” after the first time I applied the enzyme to repel the first round of ants. :lol:

    Before I learned how to make the fruit enzyme for cleaning, I used to apple cider vinegar at full strength to repel the ants and it was successful, too. But apple cider vinegar is quite expensive. Now I can pour ample fruit enzyme all over as an ant repellent. :idea:

    Now, I’m looking forward to using the pineapple enzyme to clean my bathrooms. Do try making some for yourself to try its cleaning powers, too! :D

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  73. 189

    cindy said,

    Hi choesf,
    Am I able to use apples which are almost rotten?

    • 190

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Cindy :D

      Yes, you can use almost rotten apples, too. Yesterday, I made some pineapple enzymes from 2 overripe pineapples. I bought them when they were still green and forgot all about them. I like to let them spoil or rot a little more to aid in the fermentation process. :idea:

      Have fun making and using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  74. 191

    cindy said,

    Hi choesf,
    My apple weight is 582g,sugar 194g and water only 1.4littler .Do you think is alright.

    • 192

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Cindy :D

      The proportions of sugar to fruit to water is a ratio of 1 : 3 : 10. :idea:

      So, your water should be 1.94 litres.

      Actually, there is no need to be very accurate with the measurements….an estimate will do, too. :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  75. 193

    LEP said,

    Can you please tell me how to do this and convert the grams into teaspoons or cups or whatever…I don’t know how much a gram is…or how many orange skins?
    You have everything listed in grams and litrers…I don’t use these measurements in Pennsylvania.
    Thanks, LEP

    • 194

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear LEP :D

      When making the cleaning enzymes – there is a ratio to follow ===> 1 : 3 : 10 ===> which is 1 part brown sugar, 3 parts fruit (whole fruits or peels) and 10 parts water. :idea:

      So, if you are using 1 ounce of sugar, then add 3 ounces of fruit peels and 10 ounces of water. :wink:

      I’m sorry I’m not familiar with ounces as we follow the metric system here. :oops:

      Here is a metric conversion for your easy reference :-

      http://www.metric-conversions.org/weight/grams-to-ounces.htm

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  76. 195

    Curiousity said,

    Can you use the enzyme solution for washing clothes-colored and whites?

    • 196

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Curiousity :D

      I have added about 1/4 cup of undiluted enzymes to wash towels and coloured clothes and I didn’t add in liquid fabric conditioner. The clothes turned out softer than expected.

      However, we have to be careful about using the enzyme on whites as the enzyme is yellowish in colour and it may discolour the whites.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  77. 197

    Curiosity said,

    Hi! Thanks for your tip. Just to clarify, do you mean to say you added the 1/4 cup of enzymes in the washing machine filled with the clothes, required water and laundry detergent?

    • 198

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      You are most welcome to the tip, dear Curiousity. Yes, I added the 1/4 cup of enzyme to water and laundry detergent. :idea:

      1/4 cup of enzyme mixed with 2 tbsps of laundry detergent and 1 cup of water can be used on some stains on clothes before putting them into the washing machine for a regular wash cycle. It’s very good for removing stains easily. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  78. 199

    Jim said,

    Hi there, thanks for a very interesting blog. I was reading up on a commercial product called Kleen Free, which I presume is the same sort of thing, but I think I’ll have a go at making my own since commerciall enzymatic cleaners are quite expensive here in South Africa. My situation is a bit unusual. I believe I have mites in my house (and on me) either from my pet rats or from some other source. This I have determined is the cause of some mild rosacea on my face as well as some random flare-ups of adult acne (it’s no fun feeling little bugs crawling over your face & hair) :( I was hoping the home-made enzyme concoction will work to remove these mites from myself and my home and was wondering if you or any of your readers have had success in this regard.

    Anyway, I will start a batch today with some yeast to speed it along, but since waiting is not an option I will be buying a commercial product in the meantime to see if that makes any difference. I do know that tea tree oil kills mites but it’s very costly here…. so let’s see how it goes… I may even add some to the finished product to maybe boost its effectiveness…

    Thanks again for your great blog.
    James

    • 200

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear James :D

      Thank you for your compliments on my blog. I’m sorry to hear about your mites’ situation and hope you can find a good solution for them soon. It sounds scary to have mites crawling over you.

      So far, I have not heard of the homemade enzyme being used to deter mites here but you can give it a try. If you can find lemon grass in your area in South Africa to add on to your enzyme, lemon grass is a very good natural pesticide. Once your enzyme is ready, probably in 3 weeks’ to a month’s time as you are following the yeast method, test out your enzyme in a small area at home to see if it will deter the mites. Start with a solution of equal parts of water to enzyme. :idea:

      Hope it works!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 201

        Jim said,

        Hi again, thanks for the reply. :) My first batch of emzyme is bubbling away nicely, looking forward to trying it. I’ve used some lemon and pineapple skins along with some bits of papaya, so it should be interesting. Smells nice already. Regarding the mites, no need for concern, I am just glad I have finally discovered the cause of my flare-ups! I have also learned that people who are susceptible to mite irritations (believe it or not, most of us have mites on us with no issues) usually have lowered immune systems. This makes a lot of sense since I have been under tremendous pressure at work these past few years. So it’s actually a good thing in a way, having given me the motivation I needed to get back to the gym and back to eating properly. I have been getting my emzymes from the odd bottle of kombucha (yum) as well as a bit of yoghurt daily, but I think I’ll try your enzyme drink soon, or maybe the soup if I can find the ingredients – that should boost my immunity even more and finally drive these buggers into remission. Thanks for the lemon grass tip – I have been eyeing it out at the health food store and now I’ll definitely buy some. By the way, emzymes are very effective miticides (hence the Kleen Free idea), so there’s a good chance this enzyme recipe will work just as well. Wish me luck. ;) Cheers.

      • 202

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, dear James :D

        It sounds like your enzymes are coming along nicely. **two thumbs up**

        Thank you for sharing your information on enzymes being good and effective miticides – now, we can add one more to the list of benefits of our homemade enzymes. :wink:

        I got the lemon grass idea for making enzymes as a better pesticide from a lemon grass product which I had bought and tried a few years ago. Now, I don’t use that anymore and use my homemade enzymes instead. Here’s my post on the lemon grass natural pesticide :-

        http://happyhomemaker88.com/2008/04/10/natural-plant-extract-pesticide/

        It’s good you are picking up your gym and sensible eating routine. Most of us under stress or pressure would tend to forget to exercise and eat well. Drinking the Miracle Vegetable Soup and Fruit Enzymes will boost your health and immunity. :idea:

        Do have a wonderful weekend!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  79. 203

    Jim said,

    Whoops, meant enzyme with an “n”.

  80. 204

    Suzette said,

    This is an awesome blog site. I learned about enzymes on February 26, 2011, and did some more research. I made some fruit enzyme and eco/garbage enzymes. I have at least 23 batches in various stages of fermentation. I used gallon water jigs to make the eco enzymes. I learned about putting in yeast to speed up fermentation from your blog. Thanks for the tip. Do you know if it is good for the fruit enzymes that we make for consumption to put yeast in them? I read in one DIYsite you can drink the fruit enzymes after a month but that 4 months was best. Since I learned about making enzymes I post a message on Facebook at least four times a week to make people aware about eco friendly products that you can make at home. Knowlege is power and I love to learn. Thanks for all the tips you have posted here especially the one about the pesticide or insect repellent.
    Thanks again,

    Suzette

    • 205

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Suzette :D

      Thank you for your compliments on my blog. I’m glad you found the enzyme information useful. :wink:

      Yes, there is a lot of information in the Internet on drinking fruit enzymes – the longer they are kept, the better they taste. I had some dragon fruit enzyme which I stopped drinking when I went on the Miracle Vegetable Soup and I put the rest of that enzyme in my fridge. Heheh, I forgot all about that until a few months back and I drank the rest of it. One thing for sure, it has turned more alcoholic from the sugar fermentation. :lol:

      Wow, you have a lot of enzymes fermenting, 23 gallons is a lot of enzymes – you can be the expert on enzymes already. Because of the many uses of enzymes, there can never be too much enzymes around…the pulp and sludge can be used to speed up the fermentation process of future enzymes and also to reduce the “gaseous bubbling” effect. :wink:

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 206

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        P.S. As the drinking fruit enzyme fermentation process is shorter than that of the cleaning enzyme, there is no need to put any yeast to hasten the time. Anyway, I think for some homemade wine or vinegar, yeast is added? So far, I have not heard of yeast being added to drinking fruit enzymes. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  81. 207

    Suzette said,

    Hi, do you know of any fruit enzyme mixture that helps with breaking down body fat??

    • 208

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Suzette :D

      Last month, an article came out in my local newspapers about fermenting some coconut water which have benefits as a probiotic, a booster for good health and for slimming. I was very interested in making some of that as my second daughter is overweight. Here is the link to that article and an excerpt of it is copied below that :-

      http://thestar.com.my/metro/story.asp?file=/2011/2/6/sundaymetro/7887834&sec=sundaymetro

      Coconut Probiotic Drink (four servings)

      This rejuvenating drink helps in the slimming process as it improves metabolism and boosts energy. It also prevents heart disease, lowers cholesterol and helps with chronic fatigue. It’s a good choice for those with Crohn’s disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome and other digestive disorders. It’s antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal, and also helps to maintain thyroid health and prevent wrinkles and age spots.

      50ml warm water

      30g coconut sugar

      1 litre fresh coconut water

      1 coconut, flesh only

      Bring water to boil. Turn off heat, add coconut sugar and stir to dissolve. Set aside to cool until warm.

      Place the coconut water and flesh in a sterilised glass jar and stir in the warm coconut sugar-water. Cover jar with lid and leave to ferment in the refrigerator for three to four days.
      Healing pina colada cooler

      After that time, remove jar from the fridge and ferment at room temperature for four to five days, until the liquid is foamy.

      The foam can be as thick as 1cm. When the drink is mature, it will taste sour.

      Strain the liquid and store, covered, in the fridge. Serve cold.

      Healing Pina Colada Cooler (makes 400ml)

      This tropical tongue-twister uses the coconut probiotic drink as a base, and combines it with pineapple, which contains the enzyme bromelain. This enzyme helps to digest protein, so it’s a good drink to have after a high-protein meal.

      250ml coconut probiotic drink

      200g fresh organic pineapple

      50ml fresh coconut milk

      1 cup ice cubes pineapple wedges, for garnish

      Place all ingredients in a blender. Whizz until mixture is smooth and foamy. Pour out into a glass and garnish with the pineapple wedges.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  82. 209

    Mami4Kailyn said,

    Hi Choesf,

    This is my first time here on this website. I find that you are very knowledgeable about a homemade enzymatic cleaner. We moved to a new house 6 months ago. I have two cats. My female cat (Mally) is great. Now my boy cat (Darth) is not so great about using a litter box after the move. I have had to move everything out of the living room and into the family room only to find several pee stains. I tried several store bought cleaners that are for “Pet odor and Stains.” Turns out one of the bottles beached my carpet and the other didnt do much for the smell or stain. Since then i bought a carpet cleaning machine. well over $200 dollars. i let it dry and checked again with a black light and the stain and smell is still there. Im at my wits end. We want to have a house warming party soon but im so embarrassed to have anyone over. My boyfriend has nieces that want to come over to spend the night and i feel so embarrassed i keep making excuses. I will have to postpone the party for several months until this homemade enzymatic cleaner is done fermenting. Is there any other way to hurry up the process. I which i could have known about this 6 months ago. i wold have had several bottles done now. Goodness. Well thanks again for your time and great information. -E

    • 210

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Mami4Kailyn :D

      Yes, I do understand the frustrations you have with trying to remove the cat pee odours and stains. You can try this homemade fruit enzyme to see if it will work for you as well. :idea:

      I have written earlier about some shortcuts to reducing the fermentation period here :-

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/09/18/shortcut-to-reduce-the-fermentation-time-of-your-fruit-cleaning-enzyme/

      Although the shorter fermented enzymes also work, their potency is not up to par with the fully matured enzymes. The older the enzymes….the better they clean (though they smell more :lol: ). :wink:

      Hope you will soon be able to invite your boyfriend’s nieces over soon without any worry over the cat pee smells.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  83. 211

    Poh Lin said,

    Hi. I’ve started a few bottles of citrus enzymes and am eagerly awaiting their “maturation.” During the fermentation process is it recommended to leave the bottles in the light or in the dark? Is there any difference? Hope you can help me with this question. Thanks!

    • 212

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Poh Lin :D

      I’m glad you are trying out the homemade cleaning enzymes. I’m not sure if there is any difference leaving the enzyme bottles in the dark or in the light. I usually leave mine in the kitchen or laundry room, with exposure to light during the day and in the dark during the night, but not sunlight. So far so good. :wink:

      Have fun using and cleaning with the enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  84. 214

    Poh Lin said,

    Hi – in your recipe for Coconut Probiotic Drink, what is the coconut sugar that you are referring to? Is it gula melaka? Is there a substitute if we cannot find coconut sugar?

    Thanks!

    • 215

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Poh Lin :D

      That Coconut Probiotic Drink recipe was obtained from The Star newspaper at the link given. I still have not tried this interesting drink yet and thus, I have not got around to looking out for coconut sugar. I’m not sure if coconut sugar is the same as palm sugar or gula melaka. I will try out those Indian sundry shops or kedai runcit and ask around for coconut sugar. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  85. 217

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    Hello there, dear friends :D

    I have written a post on using the enzyme to clean and fix a leaking air-conditioner :-

    http://happyhomemaker88.com/2011/04/17/using-homemade-enzymes-to-fix-clean-leaky-air-conditioners/

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  86. 219

    pwincessdee said,

    Hi,

    I’m interested to make my own citrus based enzyme … but would like to know if the sacs of the fruit should be removed or not? Can’t really tell from the pictures above. Thanks for your reply!

    • 220

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear pwincessdee :D

      I’m glad you are trying out this wonderful fruit enzyme. Yes, the sacs of the fruit can be used, too, to make this enzyme. I usually use everything left from juicing, even the seeds. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  87. 221

    flower said,

    Hi dear friend, I had started my first fruit enzyme,hv to wait patienly for 3 mths before i cn use, so at this moment, may i ask whether the flowers be use instead of the fruits.Thanks

    • 222

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear flower :D

      I’m glad you are making your own fruity enzyme multipurpose cleaner – I’m sure you will be very happy with it. So far, I have not heard of flowers being used to make this enzyme cleaner :oops: ….if you do try that out, I would love to hear of its results from you. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  88. 223

    Jennifer said,

    Hi there,

    I am in the process of fermentation right now. I am at about a month using the yeast additive and am thinking I will still wait a bit longer to test it out. I do notice that it doesnt smell nice. Is it suppose to? I am planning on using it on poopy cloth diapers. Since the enzyme is sour smelling…wont it make the poopy diapers smellier or anthing else I clean smell dirtry?

    • 224

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Jennifer :D

      Yes, the enzyme does smell a little – perhaps, a day or 2 before using it, add a few slices of lemon or orange peels/skins and that may help to mask the sour smell a little. When the enzyme is used in a laundry wash, it is used diluted and after rinsing and drying, it doesn’t smell at all…well, that’s my experience and I hang my laundry in the sun most of the time here in the tropics. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 225

        Jennifer said,

        Question, so once I have this batch ready…what do I do with it? Am I suppose to dilute it before I use it? I am looking for something I can spray directly on cloth diapers before they go into the dry pail. They will sit there for a few dys before the get washed and the ammonia smell gets nasty!

        Please tell me what to do step by step once my enzyme is brewed!

        thanks

      • 226

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, dear Jennifer :D

        Once your enzyme is ready for use, you dilute it according to the strength or concentration needed for the job. I have not used enzymes to clean soiled diapers before :oops: and so, I can only suggest it here. Perhaps, you can start with 1 part enzyme to 3 parts water and use that on the soiled diapers. See how it goes….you can reduce or increase the enzyme ratio according to your preference. :idea:

        Good Luck!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  89. 227

    Curiosity said,

    Hi! My first batch of enzymes will be ready in 2 weeks and am excited to use it. Questions: When I mop my floors or wash dishes, clean toilets, what do I need to do? I know I have to dilute the enzymes in water but do I still have to add some kind of cleaning soap/detergent to the solution or should it be purely the diluted enzymes solution only?

    Thanks!

  90. 228

    Alice said,

    Hi there! I’m so happy and exciting to know that there is such a natural homemade cleaner. I cann’t wait to try to make my first batch, but right now I only have watermelon skin. Is it good to make the enzymes? Do you ever try this?

    Thanks

    Alice

    • 229

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Alice :D

      Yes, you can use watermelon skins to make the enzyme, too, if you like. I have made some with honeydew skins but the enzymes have not matured yet and so, I can’t confirm its cleaning efficacy. I know for sure that pineapple enzymes clean the best! :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  91. 230

    Alice said,

    Hello,
    Another question, after you mix all the ingredients, where did you store the contaier? Should it be placed inside or outside? Should it be kept in dark and cool place? Or it can be placed in the garage?

    Many Thanks.

    Alice

    • 231

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi again, dear Alice :D

      The enzymes can be stored in a place away from sunlight and preferably in a cool (no need dark) place, and where you can access them easily to check on the fermentation process. The garage is good. :idea:

      Have fun making and using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  92. 233

    Dicky said,

    Dear choesf,

    Do you know how to make enzyme for cleaning human skin?
    waiting for your reply,thanks.

    with best wishes,

    Dicky.

    • 234

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear DIcky :D

      The enzyme here can be used for cleaning our skin. However, it is best to make sure that the fruit peels and container are clean. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  93. 235

    izzah osman said,

    HELLO.. I WOULD LIKE TO ASK YOU SOMETHING. DO YOU HAVE ANY JOURNAL AS A REFERENCE FOR DOING THIS CITRUS ENZYME CLEANER? BECAUSE I WOULD LIKE TO DO THIS WORK AS MY MINI PROJECT OF BIOLOGY IN UNIVERSITY. I NEED THE JOURNALS AS A REFERENCE FOR MY PROJECT. WILL U REPLY MY MESSAGE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE PLEASE?
    THANK YOU :)

    • 236

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Izzah :D

      I’m sorry I don’t keep any journals on making this enzyme. What you see here is what I have done. You have my permission to use the information here for your biology project in university. :wink:

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 237

        izzah osman said,

        Thanx for ur replied.. hmm i`m so sad,i can not proceed with my project if i dont have any journals that can be my references… hmm it`s ok i u dont have any.. thank you! :)

      • 238

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        You are most welcome, dear Izzah. :D

        To be frank, I don’t think you would find any journals relating to this enzyme making as most of the information gathered was from word of mouth, newspapers and blogs. :oops:

        Good Luck with your project!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 239

        izzah osman said,

        yes i know about it,because i had try to found out the journals from the internet,but i couldn`t found it.. my lecturer said,if they do this experiment,of course they also provide the journals. i just want to know,what is the enzyme in the citrus that can be the cleaner enzyme. i need to proof to them(from the references). i can not say it is enzyme cleaner. i must give the name of the enzyme.. :)

      • 240

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, dear Izzah :D

        Perhaps you can check out this link – it has information relating to the origins of the homemade enzyme cleaner :idea:

        http://blackandwhite999.blogspot.com/2008/11/garbage-enzymes-more-information.html

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  94. 241

    Dicky said,

    Thanks 4 the reply Choesf.

    with best whises,
    Dicky

  95. 242

    Stacee Magee said,

    This is great! I just linked to you on my blog about washing cloth diapers http://evolutiondiapers.blogspot.com/2011/08/why-do-my-diapers-stink-answers-to.html

    • 243

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Stacee :D

      Thank you for linking me up to your post on washing cloth diapers! Do have a wonderful weekend! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  96. 244

    STan said,

    Hi Choesf, thanks for such a very interesting cum informative cum awesome blog site. I started to made the brown rice enzymes cos it’s the fastest to harvest and as stated cleaning oily pots and pans proofed very much easier and also resulted sparkling clean and shine. So say my sisters with their ten fingers up. I told them about your blog on the brown rice enzymes and eco citrus enzymes. They made the enzymes themselves for cleaning dishes, kitchen sink, stubborn stains etc etc etc. Thanks for all the tips you have posted. As I have already harvested about 2 litres brown rice enzymes which ready to use, I have left one batch of brown rice enzymes fermentation for about a month now. Question:- is there any time frame to harvest? Does the eco citrus enzymes aslo have time frame to harvest? Please advise. Thanks again,
    Lastly, are you still on your miracle vegetable soup? I’m intersted to try this recipe for general well-being. Any further advise for beginners?

    • 245

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear S Tan :D

      Thank you for your kind comments and feedback here. I’m glad your sisters have find good uses for the rice water enzymes they made. :wink:

      If you are referring to whether the enzymes have any “expiry dates” for use, I’m afraid I don’t have a definite answer to that. I still have fruit cleaning enzymes that are almost 2 years old…they smell worse and have turned a darker clear brown colour but their effectiveness in cleaning is even better! I kept some to see what happens when they are kept for a longer period and I would use some occasionally to mop my floors – I put in about 2 tablespoons of liquid fabric softener to mask the bad smell. :idea: :lol:

      On the Miracle Vegetable Soup, I still make it occasionally for my family as I am making other health soups and drinks in between. Instead of making this soup 3 times a week for a continous basis (daily drinks), I now make it once or twice a week only. :wink:

      For beginners to the Miracle Vegetable Soup – there may be some diarrhoea with black stools experienced a few days after drinking the soup. The more toxins a person has, the worse the diarrhoea…nothing to worry about, it is a cleansing process. I think the black stool could be due to the old, hardened stools that is trapped in the villi of our colon and the vege soup has helped to loosen that out. :idea:

      If you are from Malaysia or South East Asia and we have hot, tropical weather here….I suggest that you omit drinking the Brown Rice Tea as that is very, very heaty. Just drink the vege soup will do. The first time my youngest son drank the rice tea, he was so heaty right after that his face and ears turned red, and he only got relief when he drank the vege soup. The vege soup is cooling.

      It is good to drink the vege soup in the morning and on an empty stomach. It provides energy and when drank too late in the evening, one may not be able to fall asleep as easily. :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  97. 246

    STan said,

    Hi Choesf, thanks for your response and advice. Likewise, will keep this one batch of cleaning enzymes for testing purposes.

    I have started the Miracle Vegetable Soup today as I managed to buy all the ingredients in the market this morning and as adviced only drink the soup on empty stomach (after boiling for 2 hrs + it’s almost noon) before brunch and dinner. Store the extra vege soup in glass containers and refrigerate for next two days consumption . So far experience frequent urination and been drinking lots of water. Thanks to your write up on the Five Elements, it given me an idea to incorporate this when cooking brown rice. Instead of just cooking brown rice I have included black bean and or black glutinous rice, Chinese Barley, green lentil, carrot and or small red bean, fresh corn and some herbs. Been eating since two weeks ago and its tasty, delicious,very filling and easy for bowel.

    I have also just discovered your blog on Daun Pegaga, very interesting and informative articles and added this as a must have daily diet as well. Once again thanks.

    • 247

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear S Tan :D

      Wow, you are very good with health foods and drinks. Your brown rice with the legumes and vegetables sound so yummy! I love brown rice, too, but have not thought of adding stuff to it…you have given me an idea there! Thank you. :idea: :D

      Yes, taking the pegaga is very good..I am trying to grow some so that I can eat 3 leaves fresh every day but so far, I only have a little pot of pegaga that I started growing last week. So far, I buy them from the wet markets here and we take a cup every day. :wink:

      With best wishes for good health,

      choesf :D

  98. 248

    smitra said,

    Hi Choesf, how are you? I tried making the Rice Water Enzyme using the recipe you posted here. It’s been 10 days now so is ready to be harvested. However, apart from the color turned pale yellowish, nothing changed really, neither the consistency nor the smell. I wonder if it is ready to be used now. I don’t have any greasy pots to clean at the moment so can’t put it into test. Do you have any comment or suggestion? Thanks a lot.

    • 249

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear smitra :D

      I am fine, thank you. How are you?

      Rice water cleaning enzymes don’t change as much compared to fruit enzymes. The only similarity among them is the fermented smell. You can try using the enzyme to clean stove or kitchen counter tops. etc. I have feedback from people who use the rice water on anything they could think of, like mopping floors, washing bathrooms, wiping furniture/walls, etc. :idea: Remember to dilute your enzyme with water – their ratio/proportions would depend on your preference – test them out in your cleaning and see how they work best for you. :wink:

      I have only used rice water enzyme for a short period as I still prefer the fruit cleaning enzymes. :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  99. 250

    Natalia said,

    Hello! I just mixed up my first batch of citrus cleaner, using the yeast. It seems to me that you shouldn’t have to add any sugar at all if you are using a fruit as there is already so much natural sugar. Have you heard anything like this?

    Another question about sugar. I am in Canada, and here and in America, most brown sugar, especially the light brown sugar that looks like what you used above, is simply white sugar with a little molasses mixed back in. (You can also buy raw brown sugar, but at much higher expense.) When baking with yeast, it doesn’t really matter what kind of sugar you use. Perhaps if we are using the yeast method for enzyme cleaner, it also doesn’t matter?

    I have not yet added any sugar at all to the cleaner that I mixed today, as I only have white sugar and molasses, (I use it to make my own brown sugar to save money.) I’d be interested to know whether since you wrote this and made so many batches and heard from so many people, you might have learned something about a) not using added sugar at all and b) the reasons for not using white sugar.

    I wish you all the best and thank you for all the time you have put into writing about this!

    • 251

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Natalie :D

      Thank you for your comments. Indeed your questions are valid and are fruit for thought. I’m sorry I don’t have the answers for you as I am only following the “recipe” for making homemade fruit enzymes. :oops:

      I guess sugar is required to help speed up the fermentation process as the original enzyme recipe is actually called “garbage enzyme” and kitchen scraps from fruit and vegetables were used to make the enzyme and the sugar content may not be high enough. So far, I don’t have any feedback here from people who may have used white sugar in place of the brown sugar. Perhaps, you may like to try that out and let us know here how it goes for you? :idea:

      Here in Malaysia, we have many types of brown sugars, like jaggery, light brown, dark brown, red sugar, bar type sugars and they cost slightly more than white sugar. So, perhaps that could be the reason why using brown sugar here is not a problem.

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  100. 252

    Natalia said,

    Thank you for your kind reply! My mixture was bubbling already, with no sugar, however after 2 days I did add some white sugar after I found another recipe online that had been adapted for North Americans, that said “any kind” of sugar, so I thought, I guess it must have worked for someone! I also was a little worried that all the acid might affect the yeast if there wasn’t added sugar. I don’t know if there’s any chance of that really, though.

    • 253

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Natalie :D

      I’m glad your enzymes appear to be fermenting well! It’s good that you found an adaptation of this recipe whereby any kind of sugar can be used. This will be encouraging to those who have trouble finding brown sugars.

      Do have fun using your enzymes when they are ready! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 254

        savasgonen said,

        Hi Choesf!

        I have almost read all post about enzyme on your blog and I thank you for fascinating knowledge. I want to ask some question in dealts. Thanks for answers.

        Meanwhile, I want your permission to use your pictures on my forum, http://www.bizimbahce.net.

        1)When I translate in Turkish there is a complexity about apple cider? What is the apple cider? Wine or apple juice or apple cider vinegar?

        2)Enzyme is available as a pesticide but also how it seems to function as a fertilizer? Does not enzyme kill micro-organisms in the soil?

        3)In the lots of forums or internet sites, it is said that while the production of enzyme there is some Ozone gas output. How is ozone formed when the enzyme occurs?

        4)Why we must not use the white sugar? We also consume the white sugar and there is no damage on us. In that case what can be if we use white sugar while making the enzyme? On the other hand, is it possible to use molasses and white sugar together?

        5)While making enzyme, can we use beet molasses instead of sugar cane molasses?

        6)I know you “are terrified of worms!” but, can we use the sludge that remain from the enzyme production for feeding the vermicompost worms?

        7)The protective effect of citric acid in citrus fruits is known. I wonder putting some citrus fruits into the enzyme make the enzyme long-lived or not?

        Savaş

      • 255

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there and welcome, dear Savas :D

        I’m glad you are trying out making your own enzymes for cleaning. Yes, you can use the photos here for your forum. :wink:

        As to your questions, I may not know all the answers but I will try my best to reply them :oops:

        1) sometimes, in translation, some words may have different meanings. If there was any apple cider I had used, it was apple cider vinegar and that was used for making “Drinking Enzymes”….not cleaning enzymes, which just required fruit, water and sugar.

        2) I guess the enzymes are beneficial to the plants as a fertiliser, and maybe microorganisims are killed. My purpose of using the enzyme is as a plant fertiliser there only.

        3) Not sure if any ozone is released during enzyme fermentation and why, if any ozone is released.

        4) in North America, there are reports that white sugar has been used successfully to make cleaning enzymes. The original recipe for making “garbage enzyme” (the original name given to this cleaning enzyme) called for “brown sugar’.

        5) if you are referring to the cleaning enzyme, no sugar cane molasses were used…just brown sugar. If you are referring to the drinking enzymes where I had used some honey, then you can use beet molasses. I think beet molasses should not be used for making cleaning enzymes as that will not be very cost effective.

        6) I am not sure how the enzymes will work for feeding the vermicompost worms….I can only guess that the enzyme must be used in very diluted form to prevent killing the worms. I use 2 tablespoons of enzyme to 2 litres of water to wash my vegetables and remove any worms. The worms dropped off very quickly. Hence, using enzyme to feed vermicompost worms may be risky.

        7) I am not sure about the shelf life of enzymes but I used mainly citrus fruits/peels for making my enzymes. I have enzymes that are now 2 years old and although it doesn’t smell very good, it cleans even better than the 3 months old enzymes! It’s cleaning power is even better.

        Do have a wonderful day!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  101. 256

    savasgonen said,

    Thanks for your answer choesf.

    I will tell here the result of enzyme using of mine in the future.

    For now I am continuing to resarch.

    best wishes to you,

    Savaş.

  102. 258

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    More feedback on the enzyme cleaner :-

    Posted by Theresa :-

  103. 259

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    More feedback on the enzyme cleaner :-

    Posted by Theresa :-

    By the way… My first batch of Citrus Eco Enzyme is three months to date, and I’ve harvested it. I should comment on your Enzyme blog; but, since I’m here, I’ll just comment from here.

    I was previously using rice enzyme. I used the citrus enzyme to was my overly stained shower curtain. Sprayed and scrubed with a brush. Left it to soak for 20 minutes. Rinsed it off.. Then I filled a half pail of water with half a cup of enzyme to let it soak in the diluted water. WOW!!! The shower curtain looks close to new. Also used it to wash my floor. The pail of water was close to black after the wash. Also the mirror, like you said, it was lovely clean without streaks.

    Thanks,
    Theresa

  104. 260

    Joe said,

    Hi,
    I had a small question, i currently own a puppy and am having difficulty housetraining him. One of the methods suggested was to clean up after his ‘accidents’ using an enzymatic cleaner. As market value of such cleaners are quite high, will this work as an acceptable substitute?

    • 261

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Joe :D

      I have not used commercial enzyme cleaners before but the homemade enzymes work very well in removing odours and in cleaning the accident areas/ :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  105. 262

    Dicky said,

    Dear choesf,

    Do you know,what kind of enzyme for cleaning stain?and how to make it?thanks.

    Best whises,
    Dicky

    • 263

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Dicky :D

      This enzyme is very good for removing stains on coloured clothing – just pour a mixture of equal parts water to enzyme onto the stain and then wash by hand or in a washing machine as usual. Or use the enzyme undiluted is you want a stronger effect. :wink:

      For removing stains on white clothing – I still use bleach :oops: as the enzyme may cause a yellowish stain on whites. :idea:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  106. 264

    Yu said,

    Hello,
    I was amazed by your enzymes and just started to make my own enzyme. In order to spread the information to more people about making enzyme detergent, I created a Facebook fan page. Please join this page to support going green!!!! On facebook, please search the name: “Making Your Own Eco-enzyme Detergents” and Join us!!!
    Thank you so much!! :)

    • 265

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Yu :D

      Thank you for starting a Facebook page on making these really useful enzymes. I will check out your page shortly. I think someone in Spain also have a FB page on this. Take care and do have a wonderful day! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 266

      Mommy23ZsAndAC said,

      Hi Yu I searched Facebook for this name and was unable to find the page…is it still in existence? If so I would like to join!

      • 267

        Hi there, dear Mommy23ZsAndAC :D

        I know someone here started a Facebook Group on making this enzyme cleaner…but I, too, can’t seem to find it either. :oops:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  107. 268

    Paul said,

    Hi, I have just made up my first 2 bottles of your enzyme cleaner, I am hoping that I can use it to get rid of the dog urine smell from my back lawn. It’s worth a try I guess.

    • 269

      Hi there, dear Paul :D

      The enzymes are very good for getting rid of pet urine odours. However, if you are using the enzyme on your lawn (grass), you have to dilute the enzyme really thin, as it may be too strong and may kill the grass. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  108. 270

    Paul said,

    wow that was quick :) thanks for the advice, I will let you know how it goes. I have added yeast to my mix so it will be ready in a couple of weeks.
    many thanks
    Paul :)

  109. 272

    Started my first batch yesterday. Anxious to give it a try.

  110. 274

    Mommy23ZsAndAC said,

    I just started my first batch! I’m really excited…I used half a lemon rind and pulp, cucumber peel, and some orange peels that were still at the top of the trash from a couple days ago should that be ok? Also when I use the finished product would it be ok to add essential oils? I used to make my own household cleaners a few years ago and I loved putting my own scents to them! I would also like to say I admire your “upkeep” on this post and appreciate the fact that you are still taking the time to help people and answer questions after all this time!

    • 275

      Hi there, dear Mommy23ZsAndAC :D

      Thank you for your kind comments. :D

      I have used some fruit peels that are not so fresh, like a rotting pineapple that I had totally forgotten about. I have also used frozen lime or lemon skins but I often mix them with some fresh peels or pulp just to ensure I don’t miss out on fermentation, in case the frozen ones don’t ferment.

      You have a fantastic tip there on using essential oils to make your enzymes smell good! Thank you. :idea:

      Do have fun making and using your enzymes! I’m absolutely sure you will find their cleaning powers amazing!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 276

        Mommy23ZsAndAC said,

        Thank you! Now I’m even more excited! I already have made 3 bottles! lol …we eat a lot of fruit! :)

      • 277

        You are most welcome, dear Mommy23ZsAndAC :D

        When you start using your enzymes, you would be glad you made so much. I like to give some of my enzymes to friends – to those that are too lazy to make some on their own. :lol:

        I have seen 500 ml bottles of garbage enzyme (that’s the original name of this enzyme as it uses kitchen scraps/garbage and I changed the name to fruit enzyme to make it more pleasant sounding) sold at RM5 or USD1-60 per bottle at farmers’ markets.

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  111. 278

    Kendra said,

    Hi, I’m sorry if you’ve already addressed this. This is a popular blog! I started a batch of enzyme cleaner over three months ago. It started out great, started bubbling within a day, but after 3 weeks it stopped bubbling and it hasn’t changed since. It smells the same and looks the same as it did at 3 weeks. Did I use the wrong proportions (I just guessed)? Is it ruined? Can I get it to start fermenting again somehow? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

    • 279

      Hi there, dear Kendra :D

      It’s okay, questions can be repeated here, not to worry. :wink:

      It’s normal for the enzyme to bubbling after a few weeks as it starts to ferment. However, it should look different at the end of 3 months – instead of a cloudy liquid, the enzyme will turn into a clear, tea coloured liquid. Sometimes, lighter or darker depending on what sugar or type of fruit/vegetable was used.

      I recently found some good information on the homemade cleaning enzymes, some sort of scientific tests and opinions on the garbage or fruit enzyme :-

      http://www.ecowalkthetalk.com/blog/2011/03/04/responses-how-effective-are-garbage-enzymes/

      One way is to test your enzyme by using it to mop your floors – see if the pail of water at the end of the mopping is much dirtier than if you had used a commercial floorwash. Also, try to clean some glass with it and if the glass gleams a lot after that. :idea:

      Or wash your car – the dirt comes out really easy and the car will looked as if it was just polished with some wax when you have used just water and enzyme to clean it.

      Dilution – about 1/2 cup enzyme into half a pail of water for wipine, washing car. 1 part enzyme to 5 parts water for wiping clean class, kitchen counter tops, table, wood furniture.. :idea:

      Have fun using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 280

        Kendra said,

        Thanks! It doesn’t look clear at all but that could be because I put a lot of whole fruit in it and it looks like it was put through a blender now. I’ll strain it and see what color it is. I’ll check out that website too. I would try the car thing but I live in Wisconsin so that won’t work in January! I think I’ll start with the bathroom mirror. Thanks for the help!

      • 281

        You are most welcome, dear Kendra. Yes, if you are in Wisconsin, you won’t be able to wash your car in the freezing weather outside. Sorry, I am too used to the hot, tropical weather all year round here and forgot about those of you that may still be experiencing winter. :oops: :lol:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  112. 282

    [...] imagine my delight, when I learned that I could make a cleaner out of the stinky waste =0} I found Happyhomemaker88′s Enzyme Cleaner Recipe (be sure to read all the way through her recipe – she made some adjustments, based on the [...]

  113. 283

    Mommy23ZsAndAC said,

    Ok so I’m back for another question :) I now have 11 bottles of cleaner working (well hopefully it’s working) I used “American version” of brown sugar which is basically bleached sugar cane with the molasses added back to it in the first half of the batches I made and raw cane sugar in the second half of batches. I watched a video where the guy said not to use white sugar because all of the nutrients have been stripped from it. So now I’m not sure what I should do…the first batches I made have one bottle that is bubbling and has a lot of gas buildup when I open it and the second half have none yet…now I’m a little confused and wonder if I should be maybe adding something to them to be sure they are “working”

    Could you please help?

    • 284

      Hi there, dear Mommy23ZsAndAC :D

      I think someone from North America has mentioned here before that he or she had no problems with using white sugar to make the enzymes.

      I am not sure if the quality of your enzymes has been compromised in any way, but I think they are alright. Some types of fruit do not yield as much gas buildup as others. One way to know if all your bottles are working is to use them upon maturity and compare their cleaning results.

      If you feel they are not fermenting as nicely as you would like them, perhaps you may add a little more sugar? :idea: Just a thought…

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  114. 285

    Prashanth Edwin said,

    Hi

    While these cleaners are effective they do not however have any anti bacterial properties. Is there anything we may add to this to make it anti bacterial and also some thing to make it work as a hand sanitizer without the alcohol… ?

    I am also looking for a hand sanitizer recipe without alcohol in it any suggestions?…..

    Thank you once again for the lovely recipe

    • 286

      Hi there, dear prashanth :D

      I don’t think these enzymes are anti-bacterial or germ killers. There are supposed to be some micro-bacterial organisms (called EM) in the enzymes that help to remove dirt easily. I’m not sure if putting a little dettol or antiseptic would kill them, hence the effectiveness of the cleaning enzymes would be affected.

      I recently used up the last bit of my “original” enzymes made in 2009…so, it’s almost 3 years old. When I opened up the bottle, I noticed that the smell has become better and the colour of the enzyme different – actually, I almost thought it was some fruity wine. :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  115. 287

    melle said,

    Hi, I stumbled upon your blog.

    Thanks for the info on making eco enzyme. I was wondering if I could make eco enzyme from just pandan leaves, as I’ve a glut of pandan leaves in my garden.

    Thanks.

    • 288

      Hi there, dear melle :D

      My apologies for the late reply :oops:

      You have a very good suggestion of using pandan leaves for making enzymes. However, I am 100% sure but I would say if fermentation takes place with the pandan leaves, then they should be good for making enzymes. Perhaps, you can make a batch of pandan leave enzymes and another bottle of fruit enzymes and compare the 2 and see what happens. :idea:

      Heheh, over the Chinese New Year, we had an abundance of mandarin oranges – I made so many bottles of mandarin orange cleaning enzymes from peels and rotting fruit. The smell is really fantastic! I’m sure your pandan leaves enzyme will smell great, too!

      Have fun making and using your enzymes for cleaning! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  116. 289

    queenternet said,

    Hi,
    I just tried out my enzyme cleaner after 3 months of eagerly waiting. I am really disappointed…. I tried cleaning some soap scum in my shower stall with a microfiber sponge and plain water and then with spraying full strength enzyme on another section, waiting a minute to see if the scum broke up (it did not) and then using the microfiber sponge to clean. i saw NO difference between the too in cleaning ability. The only difference was the scent- garbage enzayme smells like fruit wine.

    I expected wonderful cleaning power, but it just smells like I cleaned with wine

    • 290

      Hi there, dear queenternet :D

      Thank you for sharing your experience with using the enzyme cleaner. I’m sorry it didn’t work out for you. :oops:

      For me, I am still making new batches of enzymes and have been using them successfully for cleaning well…even bathrooms.

      Try this :idea: – use a quarter cup of enzyme to 5 cups of water and wash a dirty car. See if the dirt comes off easily and your car looks like it’s newly polished/waxed. The dirt comes off so easily with the enzyme that it’s so effortless cleaning the car and that’s without the use of any use of soap – just water and enzyme. If this still doesn’t work for your enzyme, that means there is something wrong with your enzyme and it does not have EMs (Effective Mocro-organisms, i.e friendly bacteria that breaks down dirt and cleans for us).

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  117. 291

    Raiva said,

    Hi,
    how can enzyme cleaners act as pest control and yet a modified version(drinkable fruit enzyme) be good for you if taken internally? it seems contradictory. Any thoughts? Want to try but needed to clarify this point.

  118. 293

    rendy said,

    greetings,

    I have a question to ask.
    In a seminar, I likely heard that eco enzyme can help heal bleeding injury. But, I cannot find that written in internet. Is it true?

    Please answer as soon as possible because I want to write a short story based on eco enzyme for small competition.

    Thank you..

    • 294

      Hi there, dear rendy :D

      I had a quick look in the Internet about eco enzymes and bleeding … there is mention of a dragon fruit enzyme that is made under hygienic conditions for drinking. It seems the enzymes can help the blood to coagulate faster to stop bleeding.

      The enzyme in this post here is meant for cleaning, not for drinking…and so, it can’t help in healing bleeding injuries. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  119. 295

    Milan said,

    Hello, I always look for natural and cheaper solutions, been using baking soda for some time and recently started using vinegar as well, mostly for the laundry, and uncloging the drains , so while browsing for practices of using them I found the eco enzyme.

    I have just started a 5 litre batch.

    I have red that it could be used for washing bathrooms, laundry and regular cleaning of washing machine as well, cleaning dishes, vagetables and fruits, but reading the comments, I found that it is not so easy as in theory.
    You said that you do not use it for the laundry anymore and so on.
    So, could we summerize the best practices of using the eco enzyme based on the experience.
    Thanks, Milan

    • 296

      Hi there, dear Milan :D

      I’m glad you are making some cleaning enzymes to try them out.

      Depending on the “strength” of your homemade cleaning enzymes, you will need to adjust from your experience the proportion of enzyme to water for the various uses. Pineapples (fruit and or peels) makes the most effective and aromatic enzyme. From my experience so far, here are some examples :idea:

      Car Wash – 1 cup enzyme to 1 litre water, be sure to rinse off with lots of water. Car will look like it’s newly polished and will be gleaming

      Bathrooms – 1 cup enzyme to 1/2 litre water to a squirts of dish detergent. I find that the dish detergent makes the cleaning even better.

      Mop floors – 1/2 cup enzyme to 1/2 pail of water

      Cleaning pet areas – equal parts of enzyme and water. To remove urine stains and smells, use undiluted enzyme first and then repeat with diluted mixture

      Clogged Drains – the enzyme doesn’t help to clog drains like baking soda and vinegar do….but can help to maintain a clog-free kitchen sink if we pour in some concentrated enzyme down the kitchen sink and leave it overnight.

      There is more feedback here ===>

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/06/22/im-so-impressed-with-my-eco-fruit-enzyme-cleaner-heres-my-review/

      Have fun making and experimenting with your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  120. 297

    Milan said,

    Hello,
    I have made 3 batches, it has been a month already, regularly releasing the build up gas, but 1 bottle does not have any. It used to have it in first 2-3 weeks, but now doesnt .

    • 298

      Hi there, dear Milan :D

      Some enzymes will “make a lot of fuss” for a long, long time… while some will have the normal 2 – 3 weeks of bubbling and then keep quiet for the rest of the duration. :lol:

      But they are all usable. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  121. 299

    darwin said,

    Is this okay to clean cars specifically the body paint, windows, alloys wheels and tires?

    • 300

      darwin said,

      will the brown sugar produce a sticky effect in the surface?

      • 301

        Hi there, dear Darwin :D

        The enzyme is really good for cleaning cars – after the wash, the car looks like it’s just been polished. The dirt comes off easily, too. The car stays clean longer because the paintwork and glass feel really smooth to the touch. However, the enzyme must be rinsed/hosed off properly with water. :idea:

        The enzyme, if not wiped or washed off after application, may be a little sticky, but mot much as the brown sugar used in comparison to the amount of water is not a lot.

        Hope that helps….

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 302

        darwin said,

        Hi, Choesf. Thanks for your comments. I was thinking NOT to use water to hose off. What I was thinking is just to spray it on the car surface and wipe it out using a micro fiber towel. So how can I do this? How can I remove the sticky substance? what component should I add to have a shiny wax coating? any ideas :)

      • 303

        Hi there, dear Darwin :D

        Someone told me that the enzymes could cause rust on the paintwork and so, it’s best to rinse them off properly with adequate water. You would have experiment for yourself to see how to use the enzyme on the car with a good shine without any stickiness. Most people here came out with some creative uses for the cleaning enzymes, but so far, I don’t have any information on what you needed to know. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  122. 304

    Iris said,

    Hi there” Thank you for just a wonderful website. I was not clear if you need to leave the enzymes with a foaming cleaner before it is rinsed to the face. How many minutes you have to leave it.? Does the eco-cleaner has to be in hygiene conditions in order to put it in the face.?

  123. 305

    Iris said,

    By the way. Where is the pro-biotic coconut drink that have been mentioned by someone?

  124. 306

    Iris said,

    thank you!!!!

  125. 308

    [...]  The simplest solution is a box of BIZ or other enzyme cleaner.  (I am experimenting with home-fermented enzyme cleaners to verify that they actually produce protease, and not just alcohol. Will get back to you. 5/23/12 [...]

  126. 309

    Ken said,

    Hi there, from Pennsylvania, USA!

    I enjoyed reading about this and will try myself (need to clean out the front loading washer). I just wanted to add one thing, that I think will help for your fermentation. I’ve brewed beer (as well as made wine) and all brewers use a fermentation lock. Simply its a plug that is inserted, filled with water and a cap covers the water to complete the seal. As fermentation begins, the air bubbling moves the cap off and allows the gas to escape without breaking the air tight seal. Presto! Hopefully this will work for you!

    • 310

      Hi there, dear Ken from Pennsylvania! :D

      Thank you for your great tip of using a fermentation lock to allow the gas to escape during the enzyme fermentation. :idea:

      I’m sure that will work well but unfortunately, I have not seen any here in Malaysia. :oops:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  127. 311

    Shirley Pang said,

    Hi there, can I just check if it is possible to make the enzyme in a plastic pail without a tight fitting lid. Is it necessary that the container be air-tight?
    Many thanks.
    SPGG from Singapore

    • 312

      Hi there, dear SPGG from Singapore :D

      Yes, you can use plastic pails to make enzymes, too! :idea: At one time, I used an old pail for making a huge batch of enzyme and then wrap a piece of thick plastic over the top of the pail. :lol:

      Have fun making and using the enzymes for cleaning!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  128. 313

    Theresa said,

    Hi Choesf, its been a while, how are you? Just want to say that my hands are nice and smooth now. Previously when I added three months old enzyme to my dish washing liquid, I did not see any effect on my palms. Especially the finger tips that were rough like sand paper. Now after using almost a year old enzyme to my dish washing liquid for nearly a month, I am happy to say that I have nice and smooth palms and fingers. Thanks to your website info!!!

    I too used a large plastic garbage container with a twist and lock cover that is not fully air tight for making a big batch of citrus enzyme. I did not cover it with a cloth. I find it a good container to use because it gave the fermenting enzyme a nice top layer of yeast which my other batches in smaller 2 liter plastic milk bottle and 5 liter plastic water bottle did not form any yeast in them. :)

    • 314

      Hi there, dear Theresa :D

      It’s good to see you here! I am well, thank you. Hope you and your family are well, too. Yes, it’s been a while since we last “spoke” here, heheh…time certainly flies! :lol:

      Thank you very much for sharing your experience in using your homemade enzymes. You certainly did some good “research” there between the effect of 3 month-old enzymes and 1 year-old enzymes on our fingers when added to dish washing liquid. **2 thumbs up**

      Yes, the large plastic container with twist and lock covers will do well in making a large batch of enzyme indeed. :idea:

      Take care and do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  129. 315

    Tina said,

    I’m planning to use this as a Science research. Do you have any other tips on how to use them? :)

  130. 317

    Kailo said,

    For the fermentation process I use a 1 gallon glass apple juice bottle and I place a balloon with a pin hole in it over the opening. During the fermentation the balloon will expand just to the point of stretching the pin hole open which releases the gas without letting air in. This is a very old method for making homemade wine and has worked great for this project.

    • 318

      Hi there, dear Kailo :D

      Thank you for your tip of using a ballon with a pin hole to cover the opening of the enzyme bottle during fermentation. Yes, that will definitely prevent any possible “explosions” from gas buildup and yet, air is not let into the bottle. Good Tip! :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 319

        Une said,

        Hi HHM88,

        Is it critical for the process that no excess air come into the fermenting bottle constantly? what if a kind of gauze or net is placed/tied tightly over the bottle (that will certainly keep out the fruit fly & friends but would let lots of air in & out) … is that workable ?

      • 320

        Hi there, dear Une :D

        I think it is not crucial that air must enter the enzyme container :oops: …most of us have used containers that were not air tight. Hence, I think your idea of using a piece of gauze or netting sounds good :idea:

        I had once used a large plastic pail that didn’t have a lid and I tied a piece of large plastic over it…it wasn’t airtight. :wink:

        Have fun trying out your new enzyme!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  131. 321

    MissinMyCardo said,

    I started my enzymes in January and tried them a couple of Weeks ago! I was satisfied with most off the results but noticed the diluted solution had some stuff floating around in it (it looked like jellyfish?) I shook it up but it’s still there and it seems like more is growing! Mold possibly? Should this be happening? Is it safe to clean with still or should I dump it?

    • 322

      Hi there, dear MissinMyCardo :D

      Yes, diluted enzymes tend to have a buildup of mould on the surface – it’s whitish in colour – but they should be safe to use. Just filter or strain the enzymes and give the bottle a shake occasionally. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  132. 324

    Hi there, dear friends :D

    I had just written a post on adding Oranged Infused Vinegar to our homemade enzyme cleaner for a better fragrance. As most of your know by now, sometimes the enzymes don’t smell very good! :lol:

    http://happyhomemaker88.com/2012/07/12/add-orange-infused-vinegar-to-homemade-cleaning-enzymes-for-fragrance/

    Have fun trying out the Orange Infused Vinegars! :idea:

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  133. 325

    Michelle said,

    I previously left a comment asking you about the ratio for using it to clean the carpets.
    Any chance of a cheat sheet for dilution (recipes) for personal and home use?

    • 326

      Hi there, dear Michelle :D

      You can dilute the enzymes for use according to your preference as some enzymes will turn out different in their cleaning efficacy. However, because the enzymes are safe to use (my cat even loves to drink water that has some cleaning enzyme in it), you can never use too much of the enzymes for cleaning. :wink:

      Here is a list of what we can use the enzymes for and how I dilute them :idea: ===>


      1) do dishes and laundry (use 1/4 cup of enzyme). For dishes – add a squirt or two of dish detergent to create suds for better cleaning.

      2) for washing bathrooms and toilets. grime comes off easily (1 part enzyme to 10 parts water). Be sure to add a good squirt or two of dish detergent because the suds produced will make it even easier to clean the scum on the walls and floor.

      3) for removing stubborn stains and odours (coloured fabrics and floors) (use undiluted) and leave on for some time (it depends on how bad the stain is)….this is very good for removed accidental bloodstains (in panties)

      4) to clean vegetables and fruits (1 part enzyme to 10 parts water) for first rinse. Thereafter, rinse in a bowl clean water twice. Vegetables and fruits will be very clean.

      5) clear blockages in kitchen sinks and drains (use concentrated or blended pulp/sludge of enzyme)…pour into sink and leave overnight.

      6) as a natural insect repellent (use undiluted) for ants, cockroaches.. (pouring some enzyme into sink/bath/shower stall drainage holes will deter cockroaches). My home is now cockroach and ant free! If the enzymes fail to deter ants and cockroaches, try using undiluted apple cider vinegar. That will work for sure but it will cost money. :idea:

      7) as a floorwash to mop floors shiny clean (1 part enzyme to 20 parts water) or 1/4 cup of enzyme to half a pail of water

      8 ) as fertiliser for vegetables, flowering and non-flowering plants (use 1 part enzyme to 20 parts water, or use the leftover mop water). For use as fertilizers, you must use as little enzyme as possible so that the plants don’t die.

      9) as a skincare product, e.g. facial cleanser or toner (1 part enzyme to 2 parts water)

      10) wash cars – cars will look as if they have just been polished! (1 part enzyme to 20 parts water). If the car is really dirty, I use 1 part enzyme to 5 parts water.

      11) pet areas or pet accidents – for urine, wipe off all urine on floor with paper kitchen towels. Then pour 1/4 cup of undiluted enzyme onto that part of the floor. Use a paper kitchen towel to smear enzyme over a larger area. Then wipe dry with more kitchen towels. Pour 1/4 cup of water onto floor and wipe dry with paper kitchen towels or a mop. The floor should be clean by then.

      12) remove warts and age spots on neck and shoulders – use undiluted enzyme on those areas and leave on for 10 minutes every day during shower. You will notice the spots lightening up. Note – this feedback was provided by a follower here :idea: – I have not tried this yet. :oops:

      13) to clean glass and mirrors – use 1 part enzyme to 3 parts water and pour into a spray bottle. Spray onto glass and wipe dry with a cotton cloth, paper kitchen towels, or old newspapers. This solution cleans glass even better than those commercial window cleaners!

      Have fun trying out your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 327

        Michelle said,

        Just want to follow-up and tell you how happy I am with the enzyme cleaners I’ve made!!!
        Pineapple scraps and orange skins are a favorite and this mix ferments SUPER fast! Also, my carpets look amazing! It did clean the unfortunate spots and odor where our old dog was sick (no longer with us). Thank you so much!
        Michelle ~New Jersey, USA

      • 328

        Hi there, dear Michelle :D

        I am very sorry to hear about your old dog. :cry:

        Thank you so much for sharing your experience in combining pineapple and orange scraps together for faster enzyme fermentation, and for using your enzymes to clean carpets – with these tips, we can learn more about the enzymes :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  134. 329

    jam said,

    what is the theory of citrus fruits as garbage deodorizer?

    • 330

      Hi there, dear jam :D

      I don’t quite understand your question :oops: – but I know that we can use the homemade enzymes to wash our garbage cans and to remove any bad odours. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  135. 331

    Jen said,

    Is it possible to use an airlock to allow the release of air instead of releasing the air by taking off the cap each day? Does air need to get back into the bottle? We have a whole mess of airlocks we use for home-brewing projects.

    • 332

      Hi there, dear Jen :D

      Yes, you can use airlocks to allow the release of air in the bottle during the enzyme fermentation. :wink:

      Have fun making and using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  136. 333

    [...] originally got the idea to make this cleaner from a pin saw on Pinterest.  Besides the three month waiting period, it is one of the easiest and cheapest [...]

  137. 334

    [...] Added on 18 July, 2012 – Homemade Fruit Enzymes for effective cleaning and removing odours [...]

    • 335

      Elise said,

      Hi, I’m so glad I found your blog! I was looking for an enzyme recipe and I got it! I saw that process in Thailand a decade ago and want to make some to wash stuff around the house.
      I’m from Canada and I lived in Asia for 10 years, back home for the moment, but I hope I will be able to live in Malaysia sometime when my daughter is a bit older, it’s my favorite country in the world and I just LOVE it!!!!!

      Elise

      • 336

        Hi there, dear Elise :D

        Thank you for your compliments! I’m glad you love Malaysia – yes, we do have a diverse culture and cuisine here. :wink:

        Wow, I didn’t know the enzyme making process went back 10 years ago. I knew that a Thai lady originally came up with this really effective enzyme formula. :idea:

        Hope you can visit and stay in Malaysia soon!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  138. 337

    Sara K. said,

    Can you use this for cloth diapers? I buy an enzyme cleaner for them but it is very expensive.

    • 338

      Hi there, dear Sara K :D

      I have no feedback so far on using this homemade enzyme on cloth diapers. However, personally I would hesitate to use the enzyme on baby cloth diapers as harvested enzymes and diluted enzymes have a whitish mould growing, and I am not sure of the effect of the mould on the baby’s skin. :oops:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  139. 339

    Mendy said,

    Hi Choesf! Thank you for your citrus enzyme cleaner recipe and all the other great information and helpful tips you share. I made citrus enzymes in January and am wondering if you can tell me what it should smell like. Mine smells like strong alcohol – like tequila. Maybe I left it too long, but I kept thinking it needed to sit longer. I thought it would smell more like vinegar. So I have waited and now left it 6 months! But the smell is the same as 3 months ago, just stronger. It is very clear with the settlement of the fruit on the bottom. No mold ever. I used oranges, lemons and limes. I don’t really smell them, only the alcohol smell. Thank you so much.
    Mendy

    • 340

      Hi there, dear Mendy :D

      Wow, your enzymes smell like tequila? I bet they would work extremely well in your cleaning jobs, especially when they are 6 months old. :wink:

      I noticed mine smelled like wine after being kept for 1 1/2 years. One thing’s for sure – the longer the enzymes are kept, the better they clean.

      However, the fermented smell may not get better and maybe you add some orange vinegar to your water-enzyme mixture for better fragrance. :idea:

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2012/07/12/add-orange-infused-vinegar-to-homemade-cleaning-enzymes-for-fragrance/

      Do have fun experimenting with your enzymes and happy cleaning!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 341

        Mendy said,

        Oh, thank you, Choesf for your quick reply. I did read about your citrus vinegar and think I will give it a try. I will try cleaning with the enzymes today and will have to make the citrus vinegar to add later. Very excited to try it-especially on my daughter’s stinky washing machine! Thank you again for sharing all your tips and advice! Very interesting information here! Love from Georgia, USA!
        Mendy

      • 342

        Natalie said,

        Okay, I have to ask – Mendy – how are you using it on the washer? I have a washer that no matter what I do, I get stinky clothes from it and it is SOOO frustrating! Are you going to use it in a cycle to wash the machine out? Or in with the clothes? Please let us know how it goes!

      • 343

        Mendy said,

        Natalie, we ran 2 cups in a regular wash cycle in cold water (cold water in GA in this hot weather is closer to the suggested temp safe for enzymes- 98 degrees). It is a top loader so we didn’t have the rubber rim and soap drawer, but cleaned everything we could get to. When the cycle finished the washer definitely smelled fresh. But I will have to let you know how it is after she runs a few loads of clothes. Best other tip i can give you is to leave the washer open when not in use. Also use Chosef’s link http://happyhomemaker88.com/2007/11/04/remember-to-clean-your-washing-machine-monthly/ for more good info. Hope this helps!
        Mendy

      • 344

        Natalie said,

        Awesome! I have cleaned my washer often, but not this thoroughly, and not with enzymes. I will try this on the washer and then the clothes too. Thanks Mendy and Choesf!

      • 345

        Yes, the best temperature for the enzymes to be most effective is around 98 degrees Faahrenheit (around 36.8 degrees Celcius) or our body temperature. So, Mendy was right in setting the wash to a cold one when cleaning her washing machine. We do the same here in tropical Malaysia where the weather is hot throughout the year! :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 347

        You are most welcome, dear Mendy! I’m sure you will enjoy cleaning with the enzymes. :wink:

        As for your daughter’s stinky washing machine, has she cleaned the washing machine before? I’m not sure if my method of cleaning a front loading washing machine will work for a top loading one but here is the technique :idea: :-

        Remember to clean your washing machine monthly

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 348

        Mendy said,

        Hi Choesf! I am back to report on the washing machine after being cleaned with enzymes and doing laundry for over three weeks. I am happy to say that the stinky smell is GONE! I am amazed. The washer still smells fresh and clean. We cleaned the machine as stated in my comment #327 and it really worked! I have to also mention that my daughter says she used white vinegar in place of fabric softener for every load, and when not in use, she always leaves her washing machine open now. Thanks so much!

      • 349

        Hi there, dear Mendy :D

        Thank you so much for returning here to report on your washing machine after being cleaned with enzymes! Wow, it’s amazing how well the enzymes can clean washing machines, too. I’m so glad for you and your daughter that the stinky smell in the washing machine is finally gone!

        Thank you for the tip of using white vinegar as a fabric softener – I have not tried that before and must do so soon. :idea:

        Do have a wonderful day!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 350

        Christophe said,

        Hi,
        I heard a talk on the radio a while back about this smell. Apparently it is from bacterial growth in the washing machine. Most often it happens from keeping the door closed or from not washing on hot anymore. Doing the “boiling hot” wash at least once a month should keep the smell away as well. We also add vinegar or enzyme cleaner to our wash, it helps with the calcium build up and keeps it cleaner.
        So if the smell comes back, make sure to wash on the hot cycle once in a while, for example with towels or white linens.

  140. 351

    Natalie said,

    I found the link for cleaning the washer with enzymes from the other link, and am excited to try it. Thanks for the tip on the cold cycle – I would have done hot – good to know!

  141. 353

    Hi there, dear friends :D

    Here’s another tip – if your newly prepared fruit enzyme is growing a white layer of mould on the surface…try adding a few more spoons of sugar! :idea:

    I recently made 2 batches of pineapple enzymes, using the same enzyme sludge, pineapple, sugar and water for both 5-litre water bottles. However, after a few days, one of them started growing a thin layer of whitish mould on the surface of the enzyme. The mould was growing thicker slowly.

    Then, it occurred to me to add more sugar… :idea:

    I ran out of brown sugar and I just added about 5 teaspoons of white sugar, gave the bottle a good shake and I noticed the mould never came back….it’s now about 3 weeks into my enzyme fermentation.

    When I prepared the enzymes, I didn’t measure the exact proportion of sugar for both batches :oops: …so, it’s probably the one that was growing mould was lacking in sugar! :lol:

    Try this out and see if it will work for you, too.

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  142. 354

    Rudy said,

    Hello- I have been most intrigued with this information and have elected to make my enzymes without the yeast- I did mince up the fruit (pineapple and citrus) with the brown sugar and water and didn’t measure either, so this should be quite the experiment. I wanted to know if it’s ok to continue to add fruit peels ( its been about 3 weeks now) to the mix- or would it be best to start a whole new process?
    Thank you again- I purchased a commercial enzyme cleaner- and found your post while searching for other ways to use it. I’m very excited for my brew to be used, thank you so much! Ms Rudy

    • 355

      Hi there, dear Ms Rudy :D

      I’m glad you are trying to make your own enzymes for cleaning. It’s okay if you didn’t measure the ingredients required as long as you can estimate that there are 1 part sugar to 3 parts fruit/peels to 10 parts water. :wink:

      Sometimes, I would add on fresh fruit peels to older enzymes if I didn’t have enough peels to start a new batch.

      Another method I have is to fill up an empty plastic bottle with the required amount of sugar and water, and leave enough space in the bottle for fruit peels or pulp to be added gradually as and when we have them. I would put this bottle beside my kitchen sink for convenience when I peel and cut up my fruits. When there is enough fruit peels, then keep this bottle somewhere and harvest the enzyme 3 months later for use. Remember to keep the bottle cap loosely screwed on to allow any gas from the fermentation to escape. :idea:

      Have fun trying out your homemade enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 356

        P.S. I’m not sure if I may have mentioned this here before ===>

        I used to collect squeezed limes and lemons’ skins in the freezer before making enzymes with them. I no longer do this anymore because I noticed that the fruit rot too fast and do not actually ferment well enough to become good enzymes for cleaning. Also, mould builds up quickly and a lot if we use frozen fruits peels/skins to make enzymes. :roll:

  143. 357

    Rudy said,

    Good Morning HH88! Thanks so much for getting back so quickly and with more good info. Interesting the difference between rotting and fermenting isn’t it? I remember when we used to have our restaurant as a child, if the ketchup didn’t get rotated every night, it would ferment, and to this day, I’ll smell ketchup before using when we go out to eat! Snob, I know! I’ll do more research, but thought I would ask just in case you might have some knowledge– I purchased apple cider, and didn’t use it all, and thought it might could be a good starter. I haven’t opened the lid for fear of the gross, but didn’t want to chuck it either in case it might be useful. Any thoughts? Thanks again and have a wonderful day~ ( it was purchased in June and has been hiding in the back of my fridge all this time)

    • 358

      Good morning, dear Rudy :D

      Thank you very much for your information on fermented ketchup! Lately, my eldest daughter has been coming across ketchup that she thought had “gone bad” when she put it on her food. Now, she is very careful and would squeeze some ketchup to smell first before consuming it. Ah, now we know that was fermented ketchup! :lol:

      About the apple cider, I’m sorry I am not familiar with it :oops: – is it different from apple cider vinegar and apple juice?

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  144. 359

    Tara said,

    I made some enzyme cleaner using orange peels a few weeks ago. i found a site that said adding yeast would speed the process down to two weeks so I thought I would give it a whirl. The results have been dissapointing, it has an alcohlish smell that isn’t great in a room and when I tried to clean our shower, straight enzyme no dish detergent it just stuck to the dirt and left a weed feel to the acrylic. I am just wonder what has gone wrong here since everyone else thinks it amazing….what gives?

    • 360

      Hi there, dear Tara :D

      I am sorry that your enzyme cleaner didn’t turn out well. I’m not exactly sure what went wrong with yours :oops: … I can only guess and consider a few points.

      I am not sure what other sites’ instructions were on using yeast to hasten the fermentation time – I have a post here on using yeast :idea:

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/09/18/shortcut-to-reduce-the-fermentation-time-of-your-fruit-cleaning-enzyme/

      Some points to consider :-

      1) did you follow the ratios of 1 part brown sugar to 3 parts fruit peels to 10 parts water ?

      2) how much yeast did you use in your enzyme ? Maybe there was too much yeast in proportion to your liquid for enzyme.

      3) sometimes, 2 weeks of fermentation (even with yeast), may not work as well and you may have to leave the enzyme to ferment longer. The longer the enzymes are left to ferment, the better the cleaning efficacy.

      2 weeks’ old enzyme hastily fermented with yeast will not clean as well as 3 months’ old naturally fermented enzyme. :wink:

      Why don’t you prepare 2 new batches of enzyme and compare them – one with yeast and the other to ferment for 3 months :idea: ?

      I do understand that many of us are impatient to have to wait 3 long months for the enzyme to mature…but trust me, it is worth the time waiting.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  145. 361

    Jas said,

    Hi, for the emzyme, I have the white layer of bubble on top of the emzyme. How come? Was it the method I did was wrong? Or the bottle I use is not really airtight?

    • 362

      Hi there, dear Jas :D

      It is okay to have a whitish layer of either bubble or mould on top of the enzyme as that is a sign of fermentation going on. You have not done anything wrong. :wink:

      You can add in a few more teaspoons of sugar and give the bottle a few shakes every day and the whitish layer should go away. :idea:

      Do have fun trying out your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  146. 363

    Renee said,

    Hi Happy Homemaker! Thank you so much for all this invaluable information and trial and error! It’s been so helpful! I recently tried my hand at making the enzyme cleaner and it seems to work really well! The down side is the smell! I used pineapple and mango as we have an abundance of them, however the pineapple works well but stinks and the mango cleaner turned black once I ran it through the cheesecloth!! What am I doing wrong? Any help would be appreciated!

    • 364

      Hi there, dear Renee :D

      Heheh, we are all trying out these enzymes through trial and error … thanks to your feedback, we now know that mango enzyme can turn black when we harvest it for use! :wink:

      So far, I have not heard anything about mango enzyme for cleaning. :oops:

      All the enzymes do smell “funny” and some people add a few drops of essential oils to make them smell better. Maybe you can try using Orange Infused Vinegar” and see if that will work for you? :idea: ===>

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2012/07/12/add-orange-infused-vinegar-to-homemade-cleaning-enzymes-for-fragrance/

      Have fun trying out your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 365

        Renee said,

        Thank you so much! I wasn’t sure I could add a fragrance without messing something up…I’ll definitely try the Infused vinegar! I use vinegar and water on everything and I think I’ll make the switch! As for the black mango enzyme…strange! It took 2 days for it to change too…all ok then? It seems fine! Thanks again for your blog!

        Renee

      • 366

        You are most welcome, dear Renee! Yes, do try the orange infused vinegar and see how you like it! I also love to open up my bottle of orange vinegar now and then to smell it! :lol: Its fragrance is just like the orange pith/zest or orange being freshly peeled. I add some of the orange vinegar to my dish washing suds for that added refreshing zest, too! :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  147. 367

    Yvette said,

    OK, I need to tell you all how this wonderful cleaner helped me and my family when our dog was sprayed by a skunk yesterday (Sunday) morning. It was awful we kept her outside all day until I found a recipe online for skunk odor remover. Well it called for peroxide, liquid soap, and baking soda. I had no peroxide and I didn’t want to use it on my dog and hurt her eyes, so I used my enzyme cleaner that I made over 6 months ago instead of peroxide. When you add the baking soda it foams and then the soap helps it to break up the oil in the skunk spray. She has a very faint musk smell if you give her a hug, but her coat is so soft and shiny. So she is in the house laying on the floor and slept on the couch earlier and my house and furniture do not stink like skunk. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS WEBSITE!!! I am so excited to share this with my friends and family. We have many skunks in our area and it is a relief to know that this works so well. You have to leave it on for 10 min but we only left it on for 5, poor girl was tired of waiting.
    She is a Great Pyrenese with a long thick coat but she doesn’t smell bad anymore. <3 <3 :) <3 <3

    • 368

      Hi there, dear Yvette :D

      Wow, you certainly had an amazing and unique experience with using your homemade cleaning enzyme! Thank you so much for letting us know that the enzymes can also remove terrible skunk odours. I’m so happy that your dog is okay and resting now from the skunk ordeal. :wink:

      Thanks to your feedback, we can now add another application for this wonderful homemade cleaning enzyme! :idea:

      Do have a wonderful week ahead!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      P.S. Thank you for your tip of adding a little baking soda for the foam/suds in lifting oils together with the dirt. :idea:

      • 369

        padouin said,

        Hello Homemaker,
        I need your help. I own a carpet cleaning company. I’ve been using an enzyme solution for a year now that I use to clean carpets. It has worked great but due to a tragic chain of events I have to figure out what this stuff is made of and how to make it. The best working solution was in plastic bottle that I believe he made it in. It smelled like citrus orange which I assume he probably used Orange Vinager to get that smell. But most interesting was its composition. On the lower end of the bottle was this white substance that had a tendency to harden. Then above that was this oil substance (perhaps some sort of surfactant) that when I shook the bottle the oil blended with harder material and formed a kind of lava. We put a small cap in a 4 gallon tank to clean whole houses with. It works great!

        I’m thinking he just used citrus orange and lemons skins with perhaps something to whiten it like haitian cotton. But the surfactant or oily substance I’m not too sure. I know this doesn’t sound like exactly what your doing but I’m not sure and I thought it was worth a shot asking you. I’d really appreciate your response via email if you could. Thanks!

      • 370

        Hi there, dear padouin :D

        I’m sorry, I’m not sure if the type of enzyme you used to clean carpets is the same as the one in the recipe here :oops: . Probably, the only way for you to find out is to make some of this enzyme yourself and use it to see if it cleans as well as the one you used before. :idea:

        The enzymes I have does not have any white substances that harden at the bottom of the bottle, nor does it require the use of any oil.

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  148. 371

    Ros said,

    Hello Choesf!

    First of all, thank you for your post about this wonderful product. And I truly applaud your commitment to answering all the queries posted here by those following your example. :-)

    I have finished 2 batches (yield of 2 liters) using the method with yeast. So far I am truly loving the enzyme cleaner! I have four batches fermenting, 3 with yeast and 1 without (3months) and I will experiment which one cleans the best. :-) My husband and I are slowly easing out of our commercial cleaning products and experimenting left and right with the enzyme.

    Anyway, I would like to ask about the use of the enzyme to remove odor and stains on cloth diapers. We are expecting our first child and one of the things moms from North America use to keep the odor and stains away is to spray the Bac-Out Enzyme Spray on their cloth diapers. I will definitely try using the enzyme once my baby comes, but just the same, I’d like to hear your thoughts on this.

    Thank you in advance!

    • 372

      Hi there, dear Ros :D

      Congratulations on you being a mom soon! :D

      Thank you for your compliments. I’m glad you are also trying these enzymes – heheh, I could feel your enthusiasm all the way from the other side of the world where I live in Malaysia! :lol:

      I’m afraid I am not too familiar with the enzyme sprays for cloth diapers :oops: , when my children were babies, we didn’t have that available in the market yet :lol: .. hopefully, someone here may have tried the homemade enzymes on cloth diapers and they can let you know how that went for them :idea:

      I think someone asked me earlier as to whether the homemade enzymes were safe to use on an infant’s diapers…I replied that I honestly didn’t know but I told her that I was not sure if the enzymes were safe on a newborn’s skin. :oops:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 373

        Ros said,

        Thank you Choesf!
        By the way, I am from Manila, Philippines. But I just got the idea of using enzymes with cloth diapers from a North American mom.

        Since you have no experience/experiments with cloth diapers, Iwill take on this challenge and report back to you once I’ve tried it. :-) Hehehe! I’ll be using it once the diapers are soiled as a stain and odor remover and wash it afterwards. So, I guess, the enzymes will technically not touch the newborn’s skin. Anyway, I hope to report back later on.

        I now have a pineapple version fermenting, since you recommended that it is the best. I’m excited to use it too. :-)

      • 374

        Hi there, dear Ros :D

        You are very kind to take on this “experiment’ of using the enzymes on soiled diapers and share your findings here with us. Thank you! :D

        So far, we have used the enzymes successfully in removing menses blood and stain accidents on panties. :wink:

        Have fun trying out the enzymes!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  149. 375

    Tina said,

    Just a suggestion , You can blend the whole lemon skin with water first and than add in the sugar and soak for 2 weeks by adding in yeast . To faster the process .

  150. 377

    Sharen said,

    Hi Choesf. I have a batch of enzyme around 1 week old. I just discover it has white and black mold growing. Is it because I didn’t shake it often or the sugar I put is not sufficient? :)

    • 378

      Hi there, dear Sharen :D

      If you have black mould, then it is best to dispose the contents of the enzyme and start a new batch. White mould is okay as it is a sign of fermentation…black mould, I think it’s from bacteria. :wink:

      Have fun making and using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  151. 379

    Sharen said,

    Hi Choesf. Ok. Let me try again. Actually I’m using a glass jar and I didn’t close it tightly. I just use a plastic wrap to close the opening and poke a few holes with toothpick and close it with a plastic cap. Is this method suitable? :)

  152. 381

    Rudy said,

    Dear Choesf-

    I know this is wrong but have to ask anyway in case someone else had the same experience. Its been well over the 90 days since I started my batch- and the yeast grew like a monster and I continued to add brown sugar as well as water thinking my mixture was too strong ( dummy me did not measure) So- I still have a nice puff of mold on top- do I need to start over- or should I just add more b sugar? Is the solution under this beautiful umbrella of mold useable? It doesn’t smell bad at all when I lift the lid; just looks like something from a B-grade horror film!
    ( :
    Would you like to see a picture? Thanks for your help! Rudy

    • 382

      Hi there, dear Rudy :D

      Don’t worry, it is okay to ask away any questions here and I will try my best to help :wink: … but frankly, this is the first time I have heard of an overly “active” growing mould and I am not sure why that is so :oops: I can only guess that there is too much fermentation going on? But as long as the mould is white in colour and the enzyme doesn’t smell bad to you (just fermented), then I would think it is alright to use the enzyme. :wink:

      Best way to try out and see if your enzyme is working is to use it to wash a really dirty car! Well, if your weather is not too cold…mix 1 cup of enzyme to 4 cups of water in a pail. Wet a part of the car that is most dirty with water first, then splash the enzyme water onto that area…see if the dirt breaks apart and streaks..then wipe with a sponge or washcloth and then rinse off with water. That part of the car should be really clean, as if it has just been polished!

      Another good part of the car to test the enzyme on is the car headlights – the glass will be really shiny and clean as enzymes can clean glass really well, even better than the commercial window cleaners! :idea:

      Hope your enzyme works!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 383

        padouin said,

        I too am having similar problem as Rudy. How will I know whether I’m smelling the fermentation process or mould? What does fermented fruit skins smell like? Also you didn’t answer Rudy question of whether or not we can add more brown sugar to our solution to kill the potential mould. Thanks for your help.

      • 384

        Rudy said,

        Hello Padouin and Choesf-

        I am THRILLED to report that I scooped the offending mess from the top of my concoction and cleaned my car beautifully! My husband thinks I’m an absolute nut case with my scientific experiment- but he was also impressed with the results from no soap! Just an FYI- my mold was a light tan color and while I didn’t think it smelled bad, he did- but I am assuming he is not familiar with the smell of fermentation. Padouin- I hope I’m not stepping out of line with this comment– a sweetish smell will indicated fermenting where rotten will remind you of garbage.
        Thank you again Choesf for all your wonderful information and patience with all of us as we strive to getting back to basics. Hope ya’ll have a wonderful weekend~

      • 385

        padouin said,

        thanks Rudy. I’m not sure I can tell between fermentation smell and something else. It doesn’t exactly smell bad but I’m just not sure. The coating on the top is orange from the orange skin. It looks like it could be normal. Also can you ad citrus infused white vinegar to this solution to help its cleaning power?

      • 386

        Hi there, dear padouin :D

        Rudy is right :wink: – the enzyme cleans superbly already as it is. The citrus infused vinegar is just to mask the enzyme smell. :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  153. 387

    Rudy said,

    One more thing I’d like to mention re the smell of the enzymes…. as I was straining my batch into different containers it occurred to me that the smell reminded me of Kombucha tea if this will help.
    Happy Cheap Cleaning!

    • 388

      Hi there, dear Padouin and Rudy :D

      Sorry if I didn’t reply the question earlier on whether to add more brown sugar to the enzyme or not :oops: … I honestly didn’t know if that will help as I have not experienced such a large buildup of mould. Also, I have never seen tan-coloured mould before in all my enzymes…only white ones. But Rudy, if you found that your enzyme works in cleaning your car very well…then, it’s alright to have such mould formations! :lol:

      Yes, my husband was rolling his eyes, too, when I was using the enzyme at first for so many types of cleaning applications, and while the enzyme smelled fermented to me, he said it smelled like garbage smell! :roll:

      Try making a new batch of enzymes following the traditional method of not using the yeast, with the correct proportions of 1 : 3 : 10 for sugar, fruit and water…and waiting 3 months for the fermentation to happen. When making the enzymes for the first time, do measure out the ingredients correctly so that you get an idea of how much to use. For subsequent enzymes, you can estimate already…that’s what I do.

      Hopefully by then, you won’t have such monstrosities growing in your enzyme! :wink:

      Have fun cleaning away with your enzymes! :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 389

        Rudy said,

        yes ma’am- read and reread when I made my new batch to make sure the proportions are correct! I shared some with my housekeeper and she was blown away. She said she couldn’t wait to make her own- so we both thank you in that respect.
        I do have another question re the solutions that are transferred into other containers. I brought one to my bathroom to use on my face and noticed that it was starting to grow mold again. Is this normal? It does not smell bad; just curious. It was in a glass jar.
        Thank you again- I had to have the Burdock root special ordered so I can make the Miracle Soup!! I’m not sick, just have some belly fat I could do without!

      • 390

        Hi there, dear Rudy :D

        It’s amazing how your homemade cleaning enzyme can impress some people, right? Also, it doesn’t hurt our hands, like some abrasive commercial cleaners. One reader here mentioned that when she adds her one-year old enzyme to her dish washing liquid, she stopped getting cracked skin on her finger tips…but only the 1-year old enzyme will work. :idea:

        Yes, even filtered enzymes can grow mould when stored in other containers. But most of the time, the older enzymes will stop growing mould. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 391

        Rudy said,

        Dear Padouin- mine smells fruity vinegary if this helps. I believe the citrus infusion helps with the offensive smell but am not sure that it will help the cleaning power as it is quite powerful to begin with. I hope this helps!

  154. 392

    Hi there, dear friends :D

    This morning, my husband was telling me about how there is a technique to apply a special coating on a new car to protect its paint and we don’t need to polish the car for a few years. He said there is teflon-like (non-stick) coating that is so smooth that when we hose water onto the car, we can see beads of water running off the paint. However, depending on the make of the car, it will cost hundreds of ringgit, maybe more.

    Well, I then told him that when I use my homemade enzyme to wash the car, I can also see small beads of water running off our car, i.e. the enzyme also gives the paint a smooth feel and I noticed dirt and grime don’t stick on so much and the car stays clean longer! :D

    Using enzymes to wash our car can certainly save money, time and effort! :idea:

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  155. 393

    Sharen said,

    Hi Choesf. My 2nd batch of enzyme so far so good :). But before I can start using my enzyme, my house is infested with ants :(. Try to get rid of them using ant killer powder but they just keep coming back. Is there any DIY solution you can recommend? Thanks. :)

  156. 394

    Rudy said,

    Sharen, we too have had ants but I will tell you I sprayed where they were wandering and I have not had a problem since using my enzymes.

  157. 395

    aw said,

    I saw another recipe that was the same except you add apple cider vinegar at the end. Have you tried this? What is teh purpose? Can this be used on dirty cloth diapers and left on over night? Can it be used in the dishwasher? Thanks so much! This is my project for today!

  158. 397

    Gina said,

    WOW! I just ran across your blog while searching for something to get milk smell out of my brand new car’s trunk :(

    I can’t wait to make this! Too many comments to go through to see if anyone else posted about this, so forgive me if it’s a repeat.

    I don’t have many plastic bottles around but do have a gallon wide-mouthed jar (for making kombucha) and would cover it the same way others have (either plastic with holes poked or a ballon or even just a coffee filter kept on with a rubber band, much like I do when making my wild yeast starter). As long as there’s enough space for the gasses, do you think glass is safe to use?

    • 398

      Hi there, dear Gina :D

      Oh yes, this will be a first – using enzymes to remove milk smell from a car’s trunk (boot). I’m sorry to hear this has happened to your brand new car. :sad:

      You can use glass bottle to make the cleaning enzymes as long as there is some form of ventilation in the cover (your methods should be okay) to prevent gas buildup. :wink:

      However, this enzyme may take too long to mature for your use – the milk smell will be very overpowering. Perhaps, you can try using some diluted baking soda-vinegar mixture and see if that helps in the meantime. :idea:

      Good Luck in getting rid of the milk smell asap!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 399

        P.S. You may want to try using the method I have below for removing the milk smell as some of the milk would have seeped into the trunk’s carpet :idea: ===>

        http://happyhomemaker88.com/2007/12/08/how-to-remove-urine-other-odours-from-mattresses/

      • 400

        Gina said,

        Thanks so much! You’re very sweet! As I’ve gotten through about 45 of the other posts, I can see that too :)

        It’s not actually as bad as you’re imagining. I have a plastic tray that covers the whole back (just for the transportation of milk from a farm near here) but it seems to have gotten in the seal around the hatch and my husband wanted me to put something in there to neutralize the milk solids cuz little bits continue to seep out, even tho it was not very much milk! I also have gotten it on towels that still smell even after washing and will try this in my laundry. But i’m going to check out the post anyway! I’m really enjoying all that I’m learning here. I can’t wait to try the rice enzyme cleaner and drinkable enzymes as well!

      • 401

        You are most welcome, dear Gina! I’m glad you had that plastic tray there and the milk spill is not as bad as I thought. :lol:

        Have fun making and trying out your enzymes!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  159. 402

    Gina said,

    Finally today I had enough scraps to start my first batch. I added yeast as per a post way back just because i don’t have the patience to wait a few months! I’ll let you know how it goes :)

    • 403

      Hi there, dear Gina :D

      Looks like you are all set to go. Looking forward to hearing from you later. Have fun trying out your homemade cleaning enzymes! :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 404

        Gina said,

        Boo Hoo!!!! I have mold on it and will have to start again. I wonder if some of my rinds were bad to begin with as it took me 3 weeks to have enough to get started. Should I freeze them? I kept them in the fridge as I was collecting them. And how can I avoid mold next time? I’ll scroll back through the other posts later to see about that. So sad!

      • 405

        Gina said,

        I was wrong…WHEW! It was the white stuff. When I went to dump it (with tears in my eyes), I noticed a bubble appear that looked just like the other raised places I had thought were spots of mold. It’s not thank goodness and I will drain and try it on all things on Sunday this week! I’ll let you know dear Choesf!

      • 406

        Hi there, dear Gina :D

        I’m sorry to hear that your enzyme mixture went “bad” – sometimes, that happens. It’s okay, just start with another batch of enzyme ingredients. :wink:

        As you don’t have enough fruit scraps at one go, try this method :idea: ===>

        1) prepare the appropriate amounts of sugar and water according to the size of your enzyme container – shake the bottle vigourously (while capped) to melt the sugar

        2) put in whatever fruit peels or fruit pulp (like lemon skin and pulp after squeezing out the juice) that you have and give the bottle a shake to coat the fruit with the sugar solution. Continue to add in fruit peels as and when you have … until they make up the appropriate proportion to you sugar and water.

        3) from then onwards, keep the enzyme fermenting for 3 months….or 2 weeks if you are using a teaspoon of yeast to hasten the fermentation.

        I had found that fruit scraps kept frozen tend to go bad easily and they rot instead of ferment in the bottle.

        With the method above, you can take your time to make a beautiful cleaning enzyme. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  160. 407

    Gina said,

    AND once AGAIN forgot to check the box to get the replies by email. Sigh.

  161. 409

    Shiyun said,

    Hi! I had a few lemons that i had squeezed and zested and didn’t want to throw them away, so i googled and found this! Coincidentally, i have a few glass bottles that were made specially for doing this. It has a silicon airtight seal but has a air hole at the top for the gas to get out. So i’m hoping that it will be able to release most of the gas. I did the shortcut method using yeast, so hopefully i can try it in 2 weeks! Can’t wait! :)

  162. 411

    Yvette said,

    Hi Choesf,
    How are you? I wanted to share that I use my enzyme in my laundry all the time. I do not use commercial laundry soap, and when I use the enzyme it helps get food stains from my 5 year olds clothes. When I have stubborn stains or smells like when I wash dog bedding I use the enzyme and baking soda it seems to help the wash get cleaner and softer. I have no icky smells if I forget the wash in the washer for a whole day, I can put it in the dryer with a dryer sheet and it doesn’t stink.

    I use it on pet accidents and to clean my animal cages, I have reptiles, birds, a rabbit and guinea pig and it gets the poo off the cages without a lot of scrubbing. When my parrot gets out and messes on the carpet this gets it out really easy. It works just as good if not better than a commercial enzyme cleaner we use to buy until I found your awesome website.

    I put the enzyme cleaner in my carpet cleaning machine along with the cleaning solution and it gets my carpets cleaner than without it.

    For my enzyme cleaners I have used pineapple (I like this one), orange, lemons and limes. I find the lime to be more appealing than the others.
    I tried a variety of fruit scraps this last summer and I prefer the citrus, it smells better than the others, in my opinion. Again, thank you so much for your site it has saved me lots of time and money this last year.

    Yvette

    • 412

      Shi Yun said,

      Hi Yvette, How do you use the enzyme in your laundry? Do you use it in replacement of the laundry powder/liquid in a washing machine?

    • 413

      happy002 said,

      Hi Yvette, i’m just making my first batch of enzyme. Can i ask how you use it in your laundry? Do you use it in place of laundry liquid/powder in a washing machine? Thanks!

    • 414

      Theresa said,

      Hello Yvette,

      Can I ask, what proportions of enzyme to level of water do you use for your washes in the washing machine? What about your whites, will the enzyme stain the white color clothes?

      ~ Theresa

    • 415

      Hi there, dear Yvette :D

      I am good, thank you. How are you?

      Thank you so much for your compliments on my post here. I really appreciate you taking the time to post here your wonderful cleaning experiences using your homemade enzymes. Wow, those are really good applications for your homemade cleaning enzymes – you have ventured into using enzymes for your carpet cleaning machine and pet areas. Great job! :wink:

      I remember a while back, someone here commented that the homemade enzyme even helped to get rid of the awful skunk smell off her dog! :lol:

      Yes, I also prefer the citrus type of enzymes, especially pineapple, too. Although we can make enzymes out of vegetables, too, the smell was just too yucky for me (heheh, I once used an old head of cabbage which I had not cook :oops: ) :lol: .

      With my homemade enzymes, I now find my cleaning tasks much easier and enjoyable. Happy Cleaning! :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  163. 416

    jacque said,

    That doesn’t look like what I refer to as “brown sugar” in the US? Is it the sugar and molasses brown sugar or sugar in the raw brown sugar?

    • 417

      Rudy said,

      Hello Jacque- I didn’t have brown sugar for my very first batch and combined white sugar and molasses to create my own brown sugar and had (still have) great working enzymes. Since, I have used commercially purchased brown sugar and I don’t notice a difference. I am not familiar with the raw brown sugar, but feel it would be just as effective as from what I understand; the citrus and sugar are needed to create an environment for feeding yeast. I hope this helps!
      Rudy

    • 419

      Hi there, dear jacque :D

      I’m sorry, I don’t know what sort of “brown sugar” that is – it says “Brown Sugar” on the pack here in Malaysia. :oops:

      I believe some people have used white sugar to make the enzymes successfully! :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  164. 420

    TheOwl said,

    Dear happyhomemaker,

    Thanks for a very clear and fun write-up about how to make enzyme. My mistake was not reading up before trying. I made a grave mistake and will describe the details here and hope that neither you nor your readers will laugh at me for my foolishness/carelessness.

    I used to wonder why my relative’s plants are so green and beautiful so last June I asked and my niece told me about the fruit enzyme she had been making for the past 2 years. She showed me her tubs/basins of enzyme and gave me a 500ml bottle to try out. I liked the smell a lot and the fact that I could save on dish washing liquid and other cleaners. So last July I made 10 litres and in August I made another tub of 30 litres (a matter of greed I suppose LOL). Your way of starting small,1 litre of water at a time is better but if I had used the wrong formula it would not turn out right too.

    The problem is I got the formula WRONG! In my head it was 10litre water: 1kg brown sugar: 10kg fruit peel (by right it should be 3kg fruit peel and since I always have a lot it did not matter. I only used orange,lemon and pineapple peel bcs my family eats a lot of these fruits everyday. At first everything was honky-dory and the smell was really nice! Later I found small white worms which turn into tiny insects we used to see during the Cheng Beng month of April.

    Now after 6 and 7 months respectively the 30 litre tub which was made in August last year is crawling with worms. From brown with stripes they have become almost black. The brown with stripes fatter type had died off and are replaced with the almost black thinner smaller ones. This tub has 30kg of peel and only 3kg brown sugar. I read that brown sugar will kill off the worms. The cover of the bin is tight but some of the worms manage to climb out which is so scary so I do not dare to open the cover any more. I had to wash them into the drains. I was thinking of letting all the worms die off,pour out the contents and start afresh after cleaning the bins. The one with 10 litres of water had fat white worms the last time I looked but have not dared to open the cover for something like 4 months now.

    How do I kill off the worms now that some naughty ones are beginning to climb out of the tub? Since I did not dare open the covers the outside had brown/black stains from too much fermentation I guess. I would prefer them to die a natural death so would feeding in a few kg of brown sugar do the trick? I really do not wish to use poison or anything cruel to kill them off.

    I hope you or any of your readers will be able to give me a good suggestion. Thank you.

    • 421

      Hi there, dear TheOwl :D

      Thank you for sharing your unique experience on making enzymes here – no, I didn’t laugh at all but I had goosebumps as I read your comments because the biggest fear I have in life are worms/maggots/caterpillars! I would jump whenever I see a worm or two in my vegetables :roll: …. wow, that sure were a lot of worms that grew out of your enzymes, if that had happened to me, I think I would have freaked out and fainted. :lol:

      As a Buddhist, I can only have this suggestion as I can’t advise you to kill off the worms, i.e. perhaps you can put your tubs into a few layers of thick, strong, large garbage bags, and bring them to a place that have trees or plants, e.g. parks, forests, undeveloped land, etc and pour out your enzymes/worms there? The worms will turn into fruit flies or moths, etc.. ? Sorry, that’s all I could come out with.. :oops:

      Hope other readers may have better suggestions for you. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 422

      Christophe said,

      Hi,

      Yes, the sugar will provide food for the yeast. The process turns the sugar into alcohol, which kills the worms. Then some other process turns the alcohol into vinegar & enzyme cleaner. The worms get digested and fermented in the process as well as it becomes acidic.

      For those who asked about the alcohol smell, that means it’s not ready yet. It goes from sweet to alcohol to vinegar. There may be a little bit of alcohol scent left at the end, but it should be more like vinegar.

      My suggestion would be to make sure the cover is tight, then shake it (or turn it around a few times if too heavy) so that any worms at the top are into the liquid and everything is at the bottom. That way it is less scary to open as there should not be any worms near the lid. Then add the sugar and close it again. Hopefully there is some room left for more sugar :-)

      Make sure to use brown sugar as it is more natural and is easier to digest into alcohol. White sugar works less well because it has been chemically altered, and the natural processes can’t handle it as well as processed white sugar. In the very same way that our bodies can’t handle man-made or processed foods as well as natural foods.

      Next time, ensure you have more water and sufficient sugar. Worms grow because the alcohol isn’t being generated fast enough, due to a lack of sugar (and sometimes too much air). I think the amount of water has something to do with it as well.

      Good luck!

      P.S. You can always try to find somebody else to put in the sugar for you :-)

      Good luck!

  165. 423

    TheOwl said,

    Dear happyhomemaker and Christophe,

    Thank you for taking the trouble to try to help me solve my problem. I don’t think it is possible to move the bigger tub as it’s too heavy with 30 litres of liquid and 30kg of peel plus 3kg of brown sugar.

    I’ll try Christophe’s suggestion by adding brown sugar but honestly I dare not touch the tub. Maybe I’ll get a courageous white knight to try open the bin to pour in the brown sugar. Will the content turn into enzyme if I add in the right amount of brown sugar and water? I’m trying to save the content as I’ve waited long enough for the enzyme after all the trials and tribulations. Luckily I used a big bin which can take a few more kg of brown sugar and many more litres of water.

    That was a very scary experience but I learnt from it and will be more careful in future. I will let you all know about the outcome of my experiments. Wah,the enzyme will be even more powerful,with all the dead worms and acid as described by Christophe.

    Thank you for your kindness. With Christophe’s explanation at least I don’t feel so scared now. Thanks again!

  166. 425

    TheOwl said,

    Dear happyhomemaker,

    I wanna thank you again. I’ve entered my email address to follow your blog. I must compliment you on your blog which is so full of useful info and recipes. I will slowly read all the useful info and cook some of your nutritious soups. You’re very generous and sincere in sharing your knowledge with your readers.

    One more reason why your blog makes interesting reading is that you write in good,standard English. These days there are so many so-called writers jumping on the band wagon,blogging about travel and food,hoping to make money from advertisements and the chance to be invited on free trips or to new restaurant launches etc. I cannot bring myself to read the stuff they write bcs of their poor English,written in rubbishy syntax. These people call themselves writers but they can’t differentiate between the sentence structures of the English language, Mandarin Chinese,Tamil or Malay. They express themselves in their mother-tongue so their sentences don’t make sense and even if they do it was a torture to read them. The only saving grace is that their blogs come with colourful,clear,large pics. I guess they should just provide info without descriptions bcs their elaboration spoils their blogs LOL. Just my honest opinion.

    I want to ask if you know what soup I can cook to strengthen my lungs as I’m very prone to cough and flu. I have a very strong but “heaty” and constitution and cannot drink iced drinks at all or even too much chilled drinks. If I go to a cold place I would surely end up with a sore throat which would eventually lead to cough and flu. It has been like this for much of my adult life bcs my body is just too “heaty”. The chinese would call it a “clash” between the “heaty” body and cold environment. What kind of soup should I boil to balance out my yin and yang?

    Thank you again for your kindness.

    • 426

      Hi there, dear TheOwl :D

      Thank you very much for your compliments on my blog – I am very flattered :oops: :D .

      Heheh, I believe in sharing with my readers any knowledge I may have on health topics and on heritage recipes. I also hope this blog will be a legacy to my children to refer to any information here that may be helpful to them in future :wink:

      I am afraid I don’t know what soup to recommend to you due to your body constituency (yin and yang balance) as I am not a Chinese Physician. The best way is for you to consult a good, reliable Chinese Physician so that he can take a reading of your pulse and write you a Chinese prescription for some herbs to take. At the same time, you can ask him what soups would be good for you. :idea:

      My Chinese Physician once told me that my body was too yin – heheh, it seemed I had drank too much cooling soups and herbal drinks that period. So, these days, I will go back and see him once every few months so that he can give me something to balance my body’s yin and yang. :lol:

      Well, I shall stop here as I have to go now to cook dinner for my family…take care and do enjoy your time at my blog, as you read my posts, we can have a virtual cup of coffee or tea together here. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 427

        Corina said,

        Hello,
        I just want to say two days ago I was searching the internet regarding cats spraying and best ways to remove the smell. Somehow I came acros your blog, and had me in a hook. I wanted to read all the blogs that night but unfortunaly i needed to get some rest for work in the morning. Today I managed to finish my reading. I couldn’t wait to make my own cleaner, so i started translating on internet from gram to cups because i don’t have a scale. This what I came up with 1/2 cup brown sugar, 3 cups fruit peel (I used cantaloupe, which I also used a blender on the peels to speed the process of decomposing), 1/2 tsp yeast and 1liter of tap water.For the bottle I only had an empty bleach bottle of 1gallon. I capped it with a coffee filter and tied it with a rubberband around it. To bad I don’t have more bottle so i could one without the yeast. I just want to say Thanks to everyone’s questions and insights, it’s been very helpful.

        Good Night,
        Corina ;’ )

      • 428

        Hi there, dear Corina :D

        I’m glad you are making some cleaning fruit enzyme – you will not regret it and you will have fun using it for various purposes. :wink:

        Not to worry about the weight of the ingredients required – just remember this ratio of 1 : 3 : 10, which is 1 kg brown sugar to 3 kg fruit peels to 10 litres water.

        So, in pounds, it should be 2.2 lbs brown sugar, 6.6 lbs fruit peel and 2.6 gallons of water. Depending on your bottle size, you cut down the ingredients accordingly.

        In cups (I looked up how many cups of sugar are in 1 kilo, it is 4 cups) ===>

        4 cups sugar to 12 cups fruit peel to 2.6 gallons of water

        Hope this helps… :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D:

  167. 429

    Matt said,

    Estemed choesf
    Most helpful information on your site about citrus enzyme.
    I will be starting my 1st batch soon and look forward with great anticipation to using it in all ways.
    Thank you
    Be well
    Matt

    • 430

      Hi there, dear Matt :D

      I am glad you are making some citrus enzyme to try out – you will not be disappointed and will enjoy experimenting with it! :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  168. 431

    Jennifer said,

    HI,
    I’ve followed your recipe and used 1 bottle just mandarin orange skins and another bottles just pineapple skins. I wonder why the orange skin bottle releases more gas while the pineapple barely releases gases. Both were made on 19 Feb 2013. I wonder if it is because I had the ‘eyes’ of pineapple inside it, or was it becoz I took them out from freezer, it was not 100% thawed? I remember it was cold but it was not frozen.

    Also it’s 16 March now, do I continue to open the bottle and release the gasses till 19 May 2013? Sorry for so many questions, and thanks for helping!

    Have a great weekend.

    Cheers!
    Jennifer

    • 432

      Hi there, dear Jennifer :D

      It’s okay, just ask away if you have any queries, I don’t mind clarifying them for you :wink: !

      There is no clear reason why some fruit enzyme will develop more gas than others, but I noticed previously frozen fruit peels will not yield as much gas.

      The most gas development occurs during the first 2 weeks of fermentation – by the first month, things would have quietened down in the bottle.

      One tip to reduce the hassle of having to open the bottle often to remove gas build-up is this :idea: ===>

      ** when you close back the bottle cap/cover, do not tighten it all the way, just tighten 3/4 of the way. This will leave the cap a little loose, and gas can escape from the bottle.

      If you get a little impatient and want to try out the enzyme eagerly (like I did when I started making my enzymes! :lol: ), you can harvest a little of your enzyme (like 1 cup) by the end of the second month, i.e. 19 April, 2013. :wink:

      Have fun using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  169. 433

    Rudy said,

    Hello Choesf~

    Its been a while since I’ve posted anything to you- my enzymes continue to work well for me, but they sure don’t last as long as they have for most people it appears. I think I’ve made several batches since learning about this last year-however, I do have a question– when our solution is ready, and we filter into other bottles; I’ll put the solids in another container as a starter or throw it out in my compost pile. After transferring and the solution settles, there is usually a sludgy looking substance that is at the bottom of the container- while the clearer solution is on top. I have been shaking this together before using it in laundry or dishwasher. Is this right, or should we just be using the clear(amber) stuff only?
    Thanks again for any info!

    Rudy

    • 434

      Hi there, dear Rudy :D

      I’m happy to see you here again! Yes, your enzyme process is correct. :wink:

      If you are using your enzymes for the washing machine, then just use the clear amber liquid only. I usually just leave the filtered enzymes alone, i.e. without shaking the bottle, and when there’s just the yellowish sludge at the bottom, I would use that to make new enzymes or mop the floor or wash vegetables/fruits with. I have my enzyme in a pump bottle for washing dishes and therefore, I never used the sludge part for fear of clogging my bottle pump. :wink:

      Thanks to the good feedback from Theresa, I now save the older enzymes for washing dishes because they help keep the hand supple and not dried out. However, the enzymes must be more than 1 year old. The 3-month old enzymes just won’t work. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  170. 436

    Matthew said,

    Hi :D

    I’m making my first batch of enzymes by fermenting orange peel. I’ve used them as detergent before and I must say they are really effective!! However, I want the solution to have a soapy texture and some more weight, meaning it suds like soap with foam and stuff. I’ve heard that adding coconut oil will help create the suds. Any idea whether this works? Will any kind of coconut oil do?

    Cheers!
    M.T.

    • 437

      Hi there, dear M.T. :D

      The homemade enzymes will not have any foam/suds, but I add a little dish detergent to them if I am using them for doing the dishes or washing bathrooms. :wink:

      I haven’t used any coconut oil before and therefore, I can’t provide any information on that. :oops:

      Have fun using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  171. 438

    Theresa said,

    Hello,

    Can Matthew elaborate more on using enzyme to wash clothes. I always wanted to try it in my wash, but not sure how much to use? In hot or cold water? Can it be use in a load of white or light colour clothes? Will it stain the white clothes? And so on …….

    Choesf, I also have a couple of bottles of enzyme that are over a year old.

    Theresa

    • 439

      Hi there, dear Theresa :D

      Oh, yes….those > 1 year-old enzymes, please treasure them like vintage wines – their smell is much more mellow (almost like those sparkling grape juices) and their cleaning power is so much better! You had also taught me that these old enzymes can help prevent us from getting cracked, dry hands from too much cleaning. :wink:

      Do have a lovely Sunday!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  172. 440

    Rupar Kyi Tin said,

    Dear Choesf,
    I’d like to know whether fruit skin like pineapple, watermelon are not melt even when it has been kept in the tight container for over 6 months in the process of making enzyme. I mean that they are still in big pieces and can be notified that they are pieces of water melon skin or pineapple skin.
    Thanks,
    Rupar

    • 441

      Hi there, dear Rupar :D

      Yes, the fruit skins will not melt and remain in big pieces…however, they will be softened. You can blend any fruit pulp leftover (after the enzyme harvesting) and turn it into a paste, which has a really strong, concentrated cleaning power – someone here use that fruit pulp/paste for washing toilet bowls very efficiently. My friend said she smears her bathroom tiles with the paste and leave that for a day or 2, then she just hoses off the bathroom grime which will come off easily. :idea:

      One way to help the fruit peels break down easier and better have them coarsely chopped in a food processor. :idea:

      Have fun using your enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  173. 442

    [...] drained.  Although my husband and I primarily use enzyme cleaner as just that – a cleaner, others use it for insect repellent and facial toner.  While I haven’t tried either of those options yet, I put a few drops in a small spray [...]

  174. 443

    I tried this and had mold after 3 days — what am I doing wrong? :-(

    • 444

      Hi there, dear Jennifer :D

      Is the mould whitish in colour? If yes, then it is normal for the enzyme to develop some mould. Just give the bottle a shake every day. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  175. 445

    Ai Lin said,

    Hi there,
    I live in Sorrento, Italy.
    I’ve been using your Citrius Enzyme for cleanning my floors. Infect, I produce 5 litre at a time. Now using the ones made April 2012. It seems its even better. My italian neighbours are using the same method! THANK YOU and WARMEST REGARDS
    Ai Lin
    愛蓮

    • 446

      Hi there, dear Ai Lin :D

      Thank you for your kind comments :wink: – I’m glad that you have made some enzymes for cleaning and you even taught your Italian neighbours this method. I bet all of you are having fun making and trying out your own homemade enzymes! :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  176. 447

    Ai Lin said,

    Forgot to tell you that here in Sorrento is known for their lemons. So, I get all the lemons that had drop off the plants. I use lemons and grape fruites. In June I mix with orange too. All these are for free!! Cos, where I live, is surrounded with lemon and orange orchardas!!!!
    Good Luck and warmest regards

    Ai Lin
    愛蓮

    • 448

      Hi there, dear Ai Lin :D

      Sorry for the late reply :oops: – my laptop was sent for repairs recently. :roll:

      Wow, lucky you to have so much free lemons, grapefruits and oranges. Certainly is a joy for you to make your own cleaning and drinking enzymes! :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  177. 449

    […] across this idea for a citrus enzyme cleaner on this blog & One Good thing by […]

  178. 450

    geoff said,

    Hello,

    I’ve been using a batch I made about eight months ago. Its a large batch in a 7 gallon tank. I pour some of its contents into smaller batches and use it to clean. But I can still see vegetable skins floating on the top of my large batch so I keep trying to add brown sugar to start the process of fermentation over but I’m unable to get the solution to produce gases like it did the first go around. Is this because I need to add more new fruits to the solution? What do you guys think? Thanks.

    • 451

      Hi there, dear Geoff :D

      If you have followed the right proportions of fruit-sugar-water to prepare your enzymes, then the enzyme should be good and the vegetable skins floating is not a problem.

      As your enzyme is already 8 months old, adding brown sugar will not produce gases. Gases is formed only for new batches of enzyme and for a few weeks only initially.

      Maybe you can just scoop out the floating vegetable skins, add a little water to them and then use the liquid to clean. The vegetable pulp left can be used as plant fertiliser or added onto a compost. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  179. 452

    Gina said,

    i am currently making my 3rd batch since December. i don’t know how anyone has it around for a year unless it’s a very large batch at one time! My first 2 batches were half the amount you put in the recipe because I didn’t have enough scraps and was anxious to get it started. I also ‘cheated’ and used yeast to get the process going, so only let my batches ferment for about 2-3 weeks. This batch I had WAY more scraps because we recently juiced a bunch of lemons for lemonade to have over the summer. I tried my usual cheat, but after 2 weeks, there was no yeast forming on the top as usually happens. (I wondered if I have too many different yeasts in the air in my kitchen cuz I also make yogurt and feed my wild yeast/sour dough every week.) So, I added more sugar and within 2 days had bubbles and a white film on top. It was fascinating to watch the yeast develop. It spread out like veins or a spider’s web as it eventually covered the whole top.

    I am just not sure how long to let it go. I’m almost out of my last batch and it’s been fermenting for a month now. Is there some sort of way to check it for ‘doneness?’

  180. 453

    kathyj said,

    hi I also need to know how to tell when the process is complete, mine was started with yeast and has been gassing now for two weeks will it always produce gas or is it complete when it no longer gasses thank you

    • 454

      Hi there, dear kathyj :D

      The original “recipe” for this homemade enzyme actually requires a fermentation period of 3 months for the entire process. The addition of yeast was a tip given by a reader here for those who are too excited to wait for the entire 3 months to use the enzyme. :lol:

      For the “quick” method, it takes about 3 weeks for the enzyme to be ready for use, and even then, its cleaning power is relatively weaker than the “original version”.

      Some signs that tell us that our enzyme is ready for use :-

      * no more gas produced
      * fruits/peels all sank to the bottom
      * colour of enzyme has turned a rich, clear bronze colour and no longer a milky yellow colour from the beginning

      Hope this helps…have fun using your homemade enzyme! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  181. 455

    Tia Serena said,

    I am surprised that 4 years later, you are still using the enzyme and answering to posts in your page! That is encouraging!
    At first I thought that “enzymatic cleaner” was just a buzz world, and that at best, the fermentation process would produce a mixture of fruit alcohol with vinegar. I was OK with that, as both are powerful cleaners.

    Then I did a bit of research – it’s not complete, but here is what I found:

    – What we are really doing here is a culture of yeast. Yeast is responsible for the decomposition of vegetable matter, and for this purpose they produce lots of enzymes.
    – Cultivation of yeasts is also used to produce enzymes for industrial use.
    – There are different species of yeast: the one we use for baking is different of those used for beer making. Different yeasts produce different varieties of cheese, for example.
    – Although one can kickstart fermentation using baking yeast, I don’t believe this is the variety that will produce the best enzymes. I think the yeasts present in fruits that have started fermentation is more adequate.
    – Pineapple has an enzyme that breaks protein – this is why people recommend eating pineapple after a barbecue! It actually helps digest the meat. Putting some pieces of pineapple while cooking meat acts as a tenderizing. Proteases are great to destroy protein stains, like meat sauce or blood. Maybe this is why people feel that pineapple cleaners are very effective.
    – Citrus peel have an essential oil called Limonene. This is a powerful grease solvent similar to turpentine. Besides it’s pleasant fragrance, it also has insecticide properties.

    I wish I could go to some biology laboratory and ask for samples of different yeasts to test!

    I started my first bottle with baking yeast one month ago, and I have the impression that fermentation has stopped, however it’s still sticky >__<
    My second bottle I started with over ripe pineapple, and it is going along nicely! I want so much so seed the first batch with some material from the second, but my husband won't let me! He said we will loose control of the experiment. He must know what he is talking about!
    Need to have patience and wait another two months now!

    • 456

      Hi there, dear Tia :D

      Thank you for sharing all that useful information from your research – that’s really nice of you. Thanks to you, we now know a lot more on how these homemade enzymes work for us! :wink:

      I’m glad you have both the yeast-hastened and normal fermenting enzymes. You will find out that they will work differently. I’m pretty sure you will enjoy tremendously your explorations on using the enzymes for cleaning and for other uses. :lol:

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 457

      geoff said,

      I have been working on my solution for about a year. It looked like it stopped fermenting for months but I just left it. I heard that simply floating fruit skins in the solution helps to make it strong. I then later added the two batches together and some yeast plus two bags of brown sugar. I then laid the solution down onto a heating pad which I have found ignites the fermentation process which is evident through its production of gases. I’ve now had it off and on the heating pad for the past two weeks but it seems done with the production of the gases. Does that mean I should just let it sit for a few months while the process continues or should I add more sugar or yeast? What do you think about the heating pad?

      • 458

        Hi there, dear Geoff :D

        Here in tropical Malaysia, we have temperatures around 80 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, and our enzymes ferment in that temperature. So, if your location is too cold, then a heating pad would help improve the fermentation. The gases usually form actively during the first 2 weeks of fermentation and then the enzymes would quieten down gradually (depending on the natural or yeast method).

        If we are using yeast to hasten the fermentation process, then the enzyme can be used in just under 1 month. Otherwise, we wait the usual 3 months for this cleaning enzyme. So, I think your enzymes are ready for use.

        The sugar, water and fruits proportions are all added at the beginning and fermentation is for 3 months to stick to the “formula” of this enzyme. Adding more sugar or yeast would “disturb” its natural fermentation process.

        Once you have some mature enzyme, use some of the sludge to start your next batch of enzymes in place of the yeast. You will notice that with the sludge, the gases are quite minimal. :idea:

        Have fun experimenting with your enzymes!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 459

        geoff said,

        I do separate smaller increments out of my solution into small containers to use and it works fine at what I’m doing, however my large container still has most of the fruit peels floating on the surface? So I always assume that I can reignite the fermentation process more to make the solution by adding more sugar, a little yeast and then I use the heating pad underneath it. For a few weeks after these steps I get a lot of gases out of my container so I assume that its still fermenting more but the peels are still floating on the surface. Ideally I want to figure out how to make an extremely concentrated version of this for my company. I want a super enzyme product. Because my peels are floating on the surface I assume that I can still make this batch more concentrated than it currently is. What do you think?

        Thanks for the all the help!

      • 460

        Hi there, dear geoff :D

        I think some types of fruit peel may stay afloat in the enzyme, although they should all sink to the bottom of the container when the enzyme is ready. I’m sorry, I don’t know how to make the enzyme more concentrated than it is right now following the original “recipe” without the use of yeast. Maybe one way would be to reduce the amount of water right from the beginning….e.g. use 50 % water instead, while the fruit and sugar amount stays the same. :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  182. 461

    Eleanor Goodman said,

    Hi..I found this blog today am enjoying it.. However, while the green font is lovely, i have trouble reading it. Any way I can switch it to black? Also, can mango skins be used?i eat a lot of mangoes. Also you mention “drinking enzymes” but I can’t find the recipe. Where is it?
    Thanks.

  183. 463

    steve said,

    I made two batches: one 100% citrus the other with 1/3 pineapple and 2/3 citrus (with usual mix of brown sugar and water). Now the usual posts ive seen failed to answer a basic question: exactly what enzyme is produced? I came across this blog, which says citrus have no ‘cleaning’ enzyme but instead are mostly alcool mixed with terpene, a natural citrus based turpentine. Pineapple and papaya do contain enzyme help breakdown proteins. The clincher, is that three month fermentation DOES NOT increase the enzyme already in the pineapple. Fermentation just makes alcool , turning that brown sugar into something less sticky…do read the post yourself and someone show a scientific test of these various cleaners..http://littlehouseinthesuburbs.com/2013/07/7-things-you-should-know-before-making-citrus-enzyme-cleaner.html

  184. 467

    […] of limescale and general crud as well as be naturally antibacterial….then I came across this POST for a Citrus Enzyme Cleaner which seemed to tick all my […]

  185. 468

    steve said,

    I tested my pineapple/lemon rind mix against stained ceramic grout in a kitchen. I removed 75%+ of stain after letting it soak 5 seconds. No harsh chemical smell , of course. Would like to know how to extract the enzymes from the mix…

    • 469

      Hi there, dear Steve :D

      Thank you for your input here … it looks like your mix is working very well – 75% of of the ceramic grouting’s stain gone in 5 seconds is fantastic. Maybe someone here may have an idea on how you can extract the enzymes from the mix. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  186. 470

    LJ said,

    What is the difference between this enzyme mixture and vinegar?

    Also, can you use raw, natural fruit juice, or boiled sugar beet juice or something else sugary instead of cane sugar? I ask because I want to be 100% self-sufficient in the future – including growing my own cleaning products!! (I would use this enzyme as a laundry cleaner). And you can’t easily grow sugar cane in England without technology such as greenhouses… which would be cheating when it comes to self sufficiency! :P

    • 471

      Hi there, dear LJ :D

      I am not sure :oops:, as I have never used other forms of sugar in place of brown sugar. Maybe you can give it a try and see. :wink:

      This cleaning enzyme cleans like vinegar but it is not as acidic.

      Have fun making and using the cleaning enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 472

        LJ said,

        Thanks for replying :)
        My mum tried to make the enzyme cleaner using apple and mango scraps and added a whole packet of yeast. We ended up with something very fizzy that smelled like cider!!! lol
        We’re trying it without yeast next time :D

      • 473

        Hi there, dear LJ :D

        Wow, that is a lot of yeast! It is okay, treat it as an experiment to make some cleaning enzymes…I am sure if you keep the yeast fermented enzyme longer, they will clean well, too. :wink:

        Have fun using your enzymes!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  187. 474

    Gina said,

    Well, the 3 or 4 previous batches I’ve made I have been too impatient and added yeast to speed the process. They all got a whitish film on top (the last batch had a very thick white layer, which it still does in the bottle…i’m guessing that’s the yeast and it’s still aging in my bottle under my sink). I decided to have a bit more patience with this batch, which I started on August 19th. However, other than attracting fruit flies, it hasn’t had any activity since the first week, where I saw a lot of bubbles. Should I add more sugar or is this normal for the slower fermentation process?

    • 475

      Hi there, dear Gina :D

      Yes, the whitish film on the surface of the enzymes is a sign of fermentation. It is also normal for the bubbling activity to decline in the second week or so. Shaking the bottle often will reduce the whitish film.

      I noticed that if we add some of the sludge leftover from the first batch of enzyme to start a new batch of enzyme, the initial bubbling activity is much lessened :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  188. 476

    Hi there! I am a singaporean student and I am in urgent need of this fermented enzyme for school but i do not have enough time to wait for it to completely ferment. I was wondering if you could sell the enzyme cleaner to me.

  189. 479

    S.U.Kaluarachchi said,

    Hello from Sri Lanka.This is a wonderful Blog.I really enjoyed and learned something new.I have two questions: (1) The boundary wall around my house is white washed.Now it has turned black from some fungal growth.Can I use this enzyme to clear away the black dirt? (2) Can you please suggest a good formula to clean/wash herbal leaves?
    I appreciate your feedback.
    Best Regards.

    • 480

      Hi there, dear S.U.Kaluarachchi :D

      Although this enzyme can easily clean off the fungal growth, your wall will still remain in dark colour where the fungal growth was.

      I don’t have a good formula for washing herbal leaves. I just rinse them with water quickly.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  190. 481

    S.U.Kaluarachchi said,

    Thank you for the replay.

  191. 482

    S.U.Kaluarachchi said,

    I have one more question which I forgot to ask earlier.What is the pH of the enzyme solution after fermentation is complete?

  192. 484

    Rudy said,

    Dear Choesf-
    Hope all is well, it has been such a long time since I have corresponded with you! I have made several batches of enzymes and they have all worked beautifully. Last month, I made some enzymes with mostly frozen lime and lemon peels and I’m finding that the yeast has taken over more so than in the past. The smell, however is the same so I know it must be fermenting properly. I guess I’m wondering if I need to add anything to combat the yeast; or should I just keep stirring it? I didn’t have any left over sludge from previous batches which I know is supposed to help as well.
    Thank you for your help and Merry Christmas!

    Rudy

    • 485

      Hi there, dear Rudy :D

      I’m glad to see you here again and that your enzymes have been working well! Stirring the enzymes or shaking their bottles can help to reduce the yeast growth. I don’t exactly know what conditions the yeast growth can be controlled – e.g. I have some bottles of enzymes that don’t grow yeast at all (without any shaking of bottles), while some keeps having a layer of yeast. But leftover sludge from previous batches do help keep the yeast grown and bubbling at a minimum. :wink:

      Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  193. 486

    Lui said,

    Hi Choesf,

    Your blog is very interesting and informative. I just start making the enzyme and orange vinegar. Looking forward to try them.
    You mentioned that you have some very old enzyme solution (more than a year). Can I ask you if you filtered the enzyme solution after 3 months and kept them for that long? or you kept them with the sludge?

    Can you also tell me how much you would add the orange vinegar to the enzyme solution to use them to clean? Do you dilute the enzyme solution first and add orange vinegar? or add orange vinegar to the enzyme solution and dilute?

    • 487

      Hi there, dear Lui :D

      Thank you for your compliments on my blog!

      I have both the unfiltered and filtered versions of really old enzymes – I usually remove the sludge bottle by bottle when I run out of filtered enzymes. The orange vinegar can be added to the diluted enzyme water in the mop pail. I only tried out one bottle of orange-infused vinegar, after that I just used a few drops of essential oils. :idea:

      Have fun trying out your enzymes for cleaning!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 488

        P.S. You can get pure essential oils at low prices here (you can use Coupon Code MLL655 during order checkout time for a discount of US$10 for purchases more than US$40 for first time buyers) :idea: ===>

        Essential Oils at low trial prices

        Shipping is around US$10 with tracking online and takes around 5 days to reach Malaysia via DHL Express courier service, right up to our doorstep. :D

      • 489

        Lui said,

        Hi Choesf, thank you for your quick response and the information about getting the essential oils. It is quite easy to get the oils here in Toronto, Canada.

        I will patiently wait for the enzyme solution to be matured.

        Happy New Year and all the best,
        Lui

      • 490

        You are most welcome, dear Lui. I’m glad you can get essential oils easily in Canada. :D

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  194. 491

    […] while my daughter played with other kiddies see, i soaked these overnight in my special mix of home made orange enzyme cleaner (there are SO many sites on this, i just picked the first url i found on google), water, vinegar […]

  195. 492

    Suhaila Sariffuddin said,

    Hi Choesf,

    I’m contacting you on behalf of English talk show, Bella NTV7.
    Very interesting recipe that you have here. How can we contact you?

  196. 494

    […] oz. ($0.38/fl. oz.)!!! There was no way I was paying that much for enzyme cleaner! And thanks to happyhomemaker88, I didn’t have to shell out that […]

  197. 495

    Christina said,

    Hi. Thanks for sharing these info. May I know how long can I keep these matured enzymes liquid. Do I hv to use them up in a month or so? Can I poke holes in plastic bags to cover the opening of the bottles to allow the gas to escape? Also may I know must the fruits skin be totally “fleshless” for making the enzymes? Thanks so much.

    • 496

      Hi there, dear Christina :D

      The matured enzymes can be kept as long as possible – I have found that the older the enzymes, the better their cleaning power! They also smell better. Enzymes more than 1 year old can be mixed into dish detergent liquid as that can help prevent our finger tips from cracking due to extensive cleaning. :idea:

      Yes, you can poke holes in the plastic bags covering the bottles – that is a good idea! :wink:

      Although I have used just the skins for the recipe above, you can use over ripe fruit – skin and flesh together. :idea:

      Have fun making and using the enzymes!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  198. 498

    Jusnah said,

    Hi Choest,

    I stumbled onto your blog while searching for a creme puff recipe. With your simple instruction my creme puff was a success! Thank you so much for the recipe. You have interesting articles and a very informative one. I am now making the enzyme for both cleaning and drinking. I have a few bottles (of diff. fruits) in production. I am anxiously waiting for it to mature and trying them out. I wanted to use the yeast for faster result, but I prefer to do it “natural”. Once again thank you for sharing.

    Regards,
    Jusnah

    • 499

      Hi there, dear Jusnah :D

      Thank you for your kind comments. I am glad that your cream puffs were a success! Do have fun making and using your cleaning enzymes! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  199. 500

    Gite Prashant Kashinath said,

    Namaste( hi)
    Prashant from Bharat
    Can we use jaggery or boiled sugarcane juice which transforming in crystals of sugar after six or seven months instead of brown sugar .
    Please guide me.

    • 501

      Namaste, dear Prashant :D

      Yes, you can use jaggery, too. Have fun making and using the cleaning enzyme!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 502

        Gite Prashant Kashinath said,

        Dhanywad ( thanks) choesf,
        I have used liquid jaggery 200 gm, banana 450 gm, water 1.5 lit is it okay proportion . Jaggery was in liquid form so I took 50 gm more. On 23rd may I have started my first enzyme batch. Guide me.
        Dhanywad
        Prashant

      • 503

        Hi there, dear Prashant :D

        Wow, your cleaning enzyme is prepared – this is the first time I have heard of a Banana Cleaning Enzyme! I would be happy to know how it will turn out. Your enzyme will be ready for use 3 months from 23 May. Have fun using your cleaning enzyme! :D

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  200. 504

    […] Happy Homemaker 88 […]

  201. 506

    Gina W said,

    I started my latest batch on July 1 with all lemon peels and had a very interesting thing happen. After about a week, the mix looked like there was 2/3 sediment and there was no activity at all in my jar, so I added some yeast. Still no change, so last week I drained it and found that the peels had all basically disintegrated! Every other batch I’ve made, the peels were all still intact, just softened..even after 3 months. This was all a thick, viscous mass. I drained it and am planning to use it in my dishwasher if you think it’s still safe.

    • 507

      Hi there, dear Gina 😄

      I have not heard of the fruit peels disintegrating before, and the thick viscous mass sounded scary – I am not sure it can be used as a cleaning enzyme. Maybe you can try using it to wash other things like bathrooms, etc instead of in your dishwasher ?

      With best wishes,
      choesf 😄

  202. 508

    LC YANG said,

    why must use brown sugar instead of normal sugar?

    • 509

      Hi there, dear LC :D

      Not sure exactly why brown sugar is asked for in the recipe – brown sugar is actually white sugar with molasses added back into it. Some people have tried using white sugar instead to make the cleaning enzyme….for me, I have always stuck to the “recipe” and used brown sugar. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D


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