Daun Pegaga / Gotu Kola / Asiatica Pennywort – A Miracle Herb You’ve Got To Try – An Elixir Of Youth, For Menopause, A Memory Enhancer, For Good Complexion, Anti-Cancer?, Anti-Candida, A One-Herb Pharmacy, Anti-Viral, etc…

A cup of Daun Pegaga drink made with steeping some leaves with boiling water for 10 minutes and then adding honey

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Good evening, dear friends :D

I stumbled onto the amazing goodness of the Daun Pegaga herb about 2 months ago and I have been trying this herbal drink out on my family. I am really amazed by what this herb can do and I am so excited to tell you about it until I don’t know where to begin! So, do get your cup of coffee and tea and prepare to be here for a while reading my lengthy post. :lol:

Daun pegaga is the local Malay name  for this herb, which is also known as Indian Pennywort or “Pang Dai Woon” in Cantonese (literally meaning “Chipped Big Bowl”). I learned from blog visitor Cina that its scientific name is Centella Asiatica, which is the most potent which is called Gotu Kola in India and Brahmi in Australia. Also known as ‘the Elixir of Life’ or the ‘spiritual herb’. Gotu Kola is one of the most important herbs in Aryuveda’s botanical  medicine chest.

Do visit the Complementary and Alternative Healing University website HERE for more information. :idea:

I was first introduced to Daun Pegaga by Master atan (my Feng Shui Master and a healer) whom I had asked for advice earlier this year when my youngest son kept getting sick and had trouble getting well despite being prescribed 3 rounds of antibiotics. It turned out that my son was extremely heaty and about the only herb that could help him was Daun Pegaga, which is known for its very cooling and healing properties.  At that time, I didn’t know where to buy Daun Pegaga. :oops:

Daun Pegaga is best described as having kidney-shaped leaves, growing on a single long stalk ranging from a few inches to 10 inches and grows as a runner plant in the soil. So far, I know there are 2 types of Daun Pegaga :-

  • the commercial variety, whereby the leaves are more jagged on the outside (the middle leaf in the photo below). This does look like a “Chipped Big Bowl! :lol:
  • the wild variety, where the outer part of the leaves is more rounded and even. In the photo below, the left leaf is a commercially grown wild Daun Pegaga, i.e. lots of fertilisers applied. The one on the right grew in the wild and not on the farm.

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Two months ago, I stumbled again onto the Daun Pegaga when I read that a lady in Singapore took this herb for only 2 weeks when her husband commented on her facial complexion which was practically glowing and much improved! Again, my interest on the Daun Pegaga was stirred and I began to do some research in the Internet on it….wow! :shock:

The more I read, the more impressed I became with the Daun Pegaga and I knew then I had to go hunt for it to try. I began by visiting my local plant nursery and I almost bought an ornamental plant that looked like the Daun Pegaga, but it wasn’t. This ornamental plant has leaves that were not kidney shaped but were whole circles/rounds instead…but they sure were similar to Daun Pegaga;s. Luckily, the lady boss of the nursery prevented me from buying it when I told her I was looking for the Daun Pegaga and she directed me to the local wet market to buy some from the Malay stalls.

Was I happy to have found Daun Pegaga at the market and I quickly bought 10 large bunches for RM1 (about US 32 cents) each.  :D

My first Daun Pegaga was of the wild variety. The Malay lady boss at the stall told me the wild type is better as a medicinal herb and it is slightly more bitter. Later on, I found some commercial Daun Pegaga, too – its taste is more similar to English flat leaf parsley.

I tried growing some wild variety Daun Pegaga and now have some peeping out below my Bird’s Nest Ferns in my garden :D

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If you type in the words “health benefits of Gotu Kola or Daun Pegaga”, you will find a wealth of information on the Internet. Elephants in India eat a lot of Gotu Kola daily – do you remember the saying “An elephant never forgets?” There you go, even elephants know this herb is good for health – in this case : as a memory enhancer.

I read a report somewhere where research of the Daun Pegaga was conducted on some lab rats. After just feeding some rats with Daun Pegaga for 2 days, some tests were done on these rats and compared to the results of those rats that didn’t take the Daun Pegaga. Wow, they found that the rats which was fed the Daun Pegaga did 2 to 60 times better in their memory tests! How’s that as a miracle herb :?:

The main reasons why I am now using  this herb for my family are :-

1) Memory Enhancer

I swear, as I am getting older, my mind is getting more foggy and forgetful. I’m hoping this herb will improve my memory. Also, I have 3 schoolgoing children – this herb will surely come in handy and help them do well in their studies, perhaps? :lol:

Some people take Daun Pegaga to aid in their meditation practice. :idea:

2) Excellent Facial and Skin Complexion

When I was making the Tateshi Kazu Miracle Vegetable Soup for my family, everybody’s complexion got better and more rosy, except for my eldest son’s! :roll:

After drinking Daun Pegaga over a few weeks, his acne actually cleared up 80 % and his old acne scars actually became less inflamed and even healed! I later read that the daun pegaga is good for healing scars and wounds. And of course, my own facial complexion just kept getting better. :D

3) Anti-Viral Properties

Who is not afraid of a recurrence of the H1N1 Flu or the Dengue Fever outbreaks? I am.

Master atan told me first about the Daun Pegaga as an “anti-mosquito herb”. At that time, I was wondering how this herb can be that. Another healer later told me this plant has “anti-viral” properties and when I put two and two together….voila! I now understand that as the H1N1 and Dengue Fever are viral in nature – taking this herb regularly will give us a good immunity against those illnesses. Good, eh :?:

4. “Elixir of Youth” & Anti Aging

Honestly, who doesn’t want to have the “Elixir of Youth”. I read in another research (I forgot the details…need to take more Daun Pegaga first :lol: ) about this herb having the capability to enhance our cells and get them to produce collagen or something like that…hence, resulting in us having a more youthful look and complexion, lesser wrinkles, perhaps?

Actually, the herb contains chemical substances called “triterpenes” that appears to enhance the formation of collagen in bones, cartilages and tissues.

5. Menopause

If you are perimenopausal like me, almost approaching middle age – you will understand the problems faced in many aspects of our life. The daun pegaga helps to alleviate anxiety and depression, relieve fatique by improving energy levels (indeed, after a cup of this, I feel energised shortly), and of course, improving memory and intelligence.

6. A One-Herb Pharmacy

Other than its anti-viral property, the Daun Pegaga has anti-septic and anti-fungal values, too. I noticed that while I was taking the Daun Pegaga drink, I had lesser instances of yeast and fungal infections…a real relief for me.

Other important benefits of the Daun Pegaga are :-

  • good for cognitive functioning (brain/intelligence)
  • good for aiding skin conditions, e.g. rashes, eczema
  • improved blood flow and circulation, hence aiding varicose veins
  • has anti-inflammatory properties – good for aiding conditions like arthritis
  • has cooling effect on the body, good for fever, too

How to take Daun Pegaga or Gotu Kola

A research on the Internet will reveal many methods of taking this herb. I shall only mention those that I had learned over these few months…different people have their own ways. :idea:

Master atan’s method :idea:

Put 3 leaves of Daun Pegaga into a cup and pour boiling water over. Steep for a few minutes and then drink. Take on a daily basis. Another way is to boil 20 leaves for a few minutes with 7 cups of water. Store in the fridge and drink one cup every day.

Added 20 Dec, 2010 – Master atan said we can eat the leaves raw, too, a few pieces daily for good health maintenance.

My lady healer friend’s method :idea:

Boil 10 bunches (1 kilo) of cleaned Daun Pegaga (roots and all) with 15 honey dates with enough water just to cover the herb for 2 hours. Drink 1 cup per person per day. This is enough to last my family of 6 over 2 to 3 days. I usually make my youngest son drink more as he gets heaty so easily.

This is for once every 2 weeks, or twice a month.

A Malay lady boss from the vegetable stall :idea:

Blend a few bunches of Daun Pegaga (cleaned roots and all) with some water, add some rock sugar syrup and keep in bottles in the fridge…drink  as a vegetable juice. No boiling is required. This is more potent and faster acting. Taste is not too bad if using the commercial Daun Pegaga…the wild variety will definitely be bitter.

Blended fresh Daun Pegaga with a little rock sugar syrup added. One bunch of leaves and about 400 ml syrup were used.

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A bunch of Daun Pegaga, washed really clean with a little Homemade Pineapple Enzyme before blending

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Another Malay stall lady boss’s method :idea:

Remove the roots, just use the leafy part and eat fresg as a salad. Recipe ===> mix a bunch of Daun Pegaga (chopped or not), with 1 or 2 chopped tomato and 1 chopped onions. Add salt, sugar and pepper to taste and squeeze some lime juAnoice in. Stir and serve as a salsa. Delicious!

My large pot of Daun Pegaga and Honey Dates ready for boiling

Warning!

As with all herbs and alternative medicines, be careful and exercise caution if you are :-

  • pregnant
  • breastfeeding
  • taking Western medication for chronic conditions like diabetes, hypertension, etc
  • some sites suggest stopping this herb for 2 weeks after taking it for 6 weeks

There you have it – a really miraculous herb. Hope you can try it out for yourself and your family. This herb has been around for many centuries but I only heard about it this year. It is good that we have such a beneficial herb around and for those of us in the tropic countries that can get this herb  easily, you should test it out. Remember….”Health is Wealth”.

Good Night!

With best wishes,

choesf :D

P.S. Disclaimer – Take this herb at your own risk. I will not be held responsible nor liable if you develop any adverse side effects from taking this herb. Thank you.


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134 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    master atan said,

    You can eat raw – wash with pipe water and eat 3 leave a day can prevent mosquito sickness and body heatiness .

    • 2

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear Master atan :D

      Oh yes, I forgot to mention that we can also eat it raw, too. Thank you for reminding me. :wink: I had updated my post already.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 3

        Carrie said,

        I am trying to find the fresh version of this herb? Can’t find it anywhere. I live in Minnesota, but I have been looking online and can’t find it either? Can anyone help?

      • 4

        Hi there, dear Carrie :D

        I am not sure if you can find fresh gotu kola in the US :oops: and I hope that someone visiting here from there may be able to help you. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  2. 5

    cina_fong said,

    Morning Choesf

    So glad you are talking about the pegaga which is one of my favourite ‘herb’ that I have in my garden. I have also did extensive research on it and posted a long blog in my website too :)

    I usually just pluck 2 leaves, wash and eat it raw everyday. Was also trying to find ways to get my family (esp my kid) to consume it) so thanks for your recipes which are very useful and look delicious. What I did was secretly add a few raw and fresh leaves on his salad haha..

    cina

    • 6

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear cina :D

      I wished I had known about this herb earlier :oops: I am so impressed with it. Oh yes, I just remembered another Malay stall lady boss told me she eats her pegaga as a salad, too. I had just updated my post with her recipe. :wink:

      This morning, I woke up with a painful left side of the body, especially a painful left shoulder joint, as if I had been sleeping “wrongly” the whole night. Also, my fungal infection is back due to the hot weather and so….

      this morning, I went to buy 1 kg of Daun Pegaga (about 10 bunches costing RM8 this time). I immediately took 1 bunch and washed it very cleanly with my new homemade pineapple enzyme for blending with some rock sugar syrup. I was told by my lady healer friend that the blended version is more potent and has faster results…so I decided to try this and see how it goes in healing me. I drank 1 cup and it tasted alright, except that the pulp was difficult to swallow. I couldn’t find the wild pegaga this morning and just made do with the commercial type.

      Otherwise, I usually make the boiled version with honey dates and my children and husband has no trouble drinking that …except when I used the wild variety when it could be very bitter. :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  3. 7

    cina_fong said,

    BTW Choesf, the pegaga on the right and left look like the real ‘pegaga’ that has all the medicinal properties described. Its scientific name is Centella Asiatica. Make sure that we do not consume the specie very commonly found in nurseries that is of round shaped with scalloped edges. That is more of an ornamental plant. There is another one which looks heart shaped (leave has an indentation) also with scalloped edges which I believe is our local specie and is supposedly edible too.

    Regards, cina

    • 8

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Thank you for your added information, dear cina. Ah, as usual, I don’t know the scientific names :oops: :lol:

      Yes, the ones on the left and right are known as “Pegaga Kampung” which I take it to mean, wild pegaga? The Malays told me the Kampung type works much better as a medicine and it is more bitter. It is harder to find the Kampung type because the Malays use it a lot as their health regime, especially the ladies. They would blend bottles and bottles of pegaga with rock sugar syrup and keep in the refrigerator for a week to be drank slowly. Personally, I thought juices should be consumed immediately after blending to maximise the intake of its nutrients which may be lost over time.

      I tried to grow the pegaga in my pots all over my garden. I used some of the roots and some, I grew a few plants fromt those I bought. However….most are not doing well…I only have those shown in the picture above. I used to eat 3 fresh leaves in the morning when I water the garden daily but I guess the plants can’t keep up with the speed of my consumption! :oops: :lol: So, have to go back to the market to buy.

      Yes, I read somewhere someone thought the whole rounded leaves (full rounded leaves) were pegaga and he ate them. Luckily, the plant nursery lady boss stopped me from buying them…..at that time, I didn’t know how pegaga looked like. Hahahah…

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  4. 9

    cina_fong said,

    Actually pegaga is very easy to grow, you can harvest the whole pot (i.e. cut it ‘botak’) and it will grow new leaves in no time. In some country it is considered an pesky weed. But I think the Centella Asiatica is the most potent which is called Gotu Kola in India and Brahmi In Australia, also known as ‘the elixir of Life’ or the ‘spiritual herb’.

    Boy, raining very heavily even as I am typing.

    cina

    • 10

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good evening, dear Cina :D

      Heheh, as I am typing this, it is raining dogs and cats. I just finished cooking dinner and taking a breather here – dinner was ham & cheese omellette, chilli cheese fries and ABC Roast Turkey Soup (turkey leftover from early Christmas dinner on Saturday :lol: ).

      Thank you for letting me know that pegaga is very easy to grow…..I am much encouraged. :wink: I shall allocate another pot for it and try again. I love it when you said we can harvest it botak and it will grow back in no time. I like to eat a few pieces raw daily.

      Just now I had 2 cups of blended Daun Pegaga(from 1 bundle about 100gm) with rock honey sugar, wow, the effects for healing my fungal infection was almost instantaneous. My fungal infection on the skin was getting unbearable when I woke up this morning because I had inadvertently scratched it too much during sleep and woke up to find the skin inflammed and painful. Am so relieved that the itchiness is now completely gone. Phew!

      Only thing is I forgot to mentioned here earlier that I noticed there is a side effect to drinking cups of concentrated pegaga (whether the blended or the boiled type) …. I developed a headache and throbbing gums a few hours after drinking it. I suspect it could be due to the cooling property of the herb “pushing” the heatiness to the top of my head (as per TCM). Strangely, this happens to me only as none of my other family members reported this side effect.

      Good Night!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  5. 11

    Chris B said,

    Hi, love your blog. Been a regular reader for some time.

    About your headaches with this herb, when I cross checked it against this site:

    http://alternativehealing.org/centella_asiatica.htm

    ..it says the dose is about 30-50g so consuming 100g worth might just be overkill, but it has a recommended recipe for its usage which also includes Mung Bean (Lu Dou – 綠荳) and that has calming effect and gets rid of headaches. So there is a potential synergy between both herbs that might be useful for you. Just replace the “centella_asiatica” in the above link with “lu_dou” if you want to see mung beans info.

    On another note how has the Mao Zedong wine turned out?

    • 12

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Chris B :D

      Thank you so much for coming to the rescue! Ah, now I know the proper pegaga dosage to follow in TCM and also to use mung beans together for my kind of health constitution. Last night, my headaches got worse and I developed a lot of stomach wind and bloatedness and so, I took 2 Ponstan and went to bed early. The next time I take Daun Pegaga, I will be sure not to go for the “overkill” :lol: – the blended one is really strong but it worked extremely well for my fungal infection (which the cream that the doctor prescribed didn’t work also, only aggravated the pain and itchiness), which is now 90% healed.

      Thank you also for the really informative link – I am always into alternative and complementary healing and I have added that to my Blogroll for everyone’s easy reference. That website is a wealth of useful information. :idea:

      On the Mao Zedong tonic wine…I still haven’t tasted it yet – it is still covered and in a corner of my kitchen since I made it 4 months ago. :oops: :lol: However, this week, I will need to use that glass container to make raisin wine and I will harvest the tonic wine to put into some wine bottles. I will taste it then and post here to let you know.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  6. 13

    cina_fong said,

    Boy, your house must be a treasure chest of healthy and purposeful home concoctions and your description of dinner make me salivate slurp! :P

    cina

    • 14

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hahahah, I do have many type of health concoctions at home….running out of space to store them…may have to consider storing them under my bed like those folks in the old days! :lol: :oops:

      Heheh, I was just looking back at what I cooked for Tung Jit, Festival in previousyears planning my family’s dinner tomorrow…probably similar festival food that we usually have –

      Winter Solstice Festival Dinner 2008

      Winter Solstice Festival Dinner 2007

      Good Night!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  7. 15

    cina_fong said,

    Dear Choesf

    I can’t seem to log onto your latest post on the shareribs. I wish I have a sister like you where I can go and have dinner :) *not hinting here :P*

    Thanks for visiting my blog. I will be flying off to Vietnam very late tonight so I like to wish you a very merry Christmas. I will be back to usher in the New Year though.

    Take care, Cina

    • 16

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear cina :D

      Ooops…my apologies :oops: I was actually drafting a post on Chinese Steamed Spare Ribs and was supposed to save it as a draft but hit the “publish” button instead. I had deleted that post already and stored it back in my Drafts for posting later. :lol:

      I think Sherry invited herself for dinner at my home the next time she comes back to Malaysia for a visit, maybe you can come together with her for dinner? :lol:

      Do have a wonderful visit to Vietnam and I would also like to wish you a Very Merry Christmas with many happy blessings.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  8. 17

    candice said,

    Dear Choesf,

    I wonder if your over dosage of this Daun Pegaga resulting in a headache means it is working on the ‘memory’ part of your brain?

    Do you (or anyone reading here) know where I can get that in Singapore? If only Malays sell this, then maybe I can try Geylang Serai or KK (Tekka) markets but if someone can point where I can get this plant easily, it will really be nice.

    Merry Christmas Choesf and all reading this post.

    candice

    • 18

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Candice :D

      Merry Christmas to you and your family, too! :D

      Hmmm….you have a valid point there. :idea: For some strange reasons, nobody in my family gets headaches or dizziness when they drink the Daun Pegaga (whether boiled, or blended fresh)….only me. :oops:

      I remember for the Miracle Vegetable Soup, I was the only one in the family, too, to get headaches and it was mentioned that people who had previous head injuries will develop headaches, which were a sign of healing or something. So, maybe my head does need some healing. :lol: My lady healer friend didn’t mention the possible side effects of headache and she has been making her version of boiled pegaga for years already. I will check with her about my headaches when I see her next. :idea:

      Regarding where to find gotu kola or pegaga in Singapore, there is a lot of information here :-

      http://www.greenculturesg.com/forum/index.php?app=core&module=search&do=quick_search&search_filter_app%5Bforums%5D=1?s=e4e1e01f331a5767e8cc513b8cc33f7a

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D:

  9. 19

    Californiagirl said,

    Can I get this plant in California – I would like to grow some.

    Love your blog.

    • 20

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Californiagirl :D:

      I’m afraid I don’t know where you can get this plant in California. :oops: Perhaps, some blog visitors here may be able to help. I read that there is a similar type of pennywort known as “marsh pennywort” in USA? But I am not sure if that will have the same healing effects as the “Indian pennywort”.

      Here is the link to marsh pennywort images –

      http://www.ppws.vt.edu/scott/weed_id/hydum.htm

      Here is the link to all sorts of pennywort :-

      http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Pennywort

      I found an interesting article which mentioned about eating fresh gotu kola (just 2 leaves daily) to counter Candida (which is a common ailment among ladies) and cancer (even pancreatic cancer) . Here is the link :-

      http://www.healthy.net/scr/article.aspx?Id=3159

      With best wishes for good health,

      choesf :D

      • 21

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        P.S. I hope it is okay for me to share that very interesting article here :-

        Pennywort for Candida, gotu kola for cancer – shared from http://www.healthy.net/scr/article.aspx?Id=3159

        © What Doctors Don’t Tell You (Volume 13, Issue 5)
        Share

        Your book The Field proved beyond doubt that all living things can and do communicate by thought with each other no matter where they are in the world. This explains why certain plants and organisms change or mutate at the same time worldwide. I remember when all the musk plants in the world simultaneously lost their scent; we also have bacteria and viruses which mutate to become immune to the latest drugs and antibiotics.

        I also believe that the current violent behaviour – terrorism, road rage and the like – are due to thought waves transmitted via the Field and picked up by receptive individuals who then, via their own thought transmissions, influence others. This would account for crowd violence and riots, where normally inoffensive people are drawn into situations they would usually avoid.

        The reason for this letter is to tell you about a new arthritis treatment. There is a plant I have learned about from one of my clients, David Cowles, a businessman who lives in Las Vegas. If you log on to http://www.nesgadol.com, you can download his essay on marsh pennywort (Hydrocotyle umbellata).

        He is trying to find someone who will analyse the plant to discover its constituents because he has discovered that it has remarkable curative powers. He has cured himself of arthritis, gout, scleroderma, emphysema and Raynaud’s disease. It heals the kidneys, too.

        His wife, who suffered from cystitis for 30 years – which no amount of expensive medical treatment had managed to cure – ate just two leaves of pennywort a day and, after five weeks, she was completely cured.

        Finally, Russ Maslen, the author of the book Arthritis BC: Before Centella that I published, has discovered that he is suffering from pancreatic cancer. But because he has been eating Centella asiatica (gotu kola) leaves for the past 11 years, the tumour has stopped growing and is now about the size of a walnut.

        His oncologist thinks he may have had this tumour all that time and – get this – Russ has foregone all forms of conventional therapy, has not lost weight and is still functioning normally. When I met him recently at his home in New South Wales, Australia, he was fit enough to take my son and me out and about to show us the sights. – Kenneth V. Jackson, Centella Probe (UK), via e-mail

  10. 22

    Nasifriet said,

    Thanks for sharing with us this wonderful and magical herb. I have heard of daun pegaga when I grew up in KCH, but had no clue of it’s health benefitis. Now that I’m in Europe, I’m just wondering where in heavens can I find this herb? If I’m not mistaken, I did come across this word “pennywort” in our local pharmacy. I think they come in tablet form, or packed dry. Do you think these will have any differences? But of course, these pills and dried version cost a bomb! I wish I can get hold of the fresh ones !!!

    I take this opportunity to wish you and your family a wonderful holiday season!

    • 23

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Nasifret :D

      Thank you for your holiday wishes – may you and your family have a blessed holiday season and a Happy New Year. :D

      I wonder if this pennywort grows like a week in Europe also? Someone here mentioned that in the US, the pennywort grows like a week in the garden. Perhaps, you may want to watch out for any plants that may look like from the pennywort family. I think those sold as extracts or pills would work, too…but like you said, they will cost a bomb. The pharmaceuticals are laughing all the way to the bank. :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  11. 24

    cina_fong said,

    Hi choesf

    I am back! Miss me?!! :p *just being cheeky*
    As usual I am going through a bit of PHD (Post Holiday Depression), its what hits you the minute you step out of the plane and our hot humid weather punch you right in the face..

    How was your Xmas dinner? Did anything spectacular? We were asleep in Halong Bay, Vietnam by 10pm on Xmas eve… nothing happening there at night.

    BTW, I have yet to call and pay a visit to … scared lah in case she finds something wrong… isn’t there really silly of me..?

    cina

    • 25

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Welcome back, dear Cina! Yes, I really did missed you here. Hahaha….left back Candice to “ding dong” with me here. :lol: :lol:

      Yes, we will get PHD for sure after a holiday…heheh, after all that fun and joy sightseeing..it’s back to the humdrum life :lol: …heck, I am even having PSD (Pre-School Year Depression) now ….with the knowledge that next week, it’s back to the grind for me when I have to wake up at 6am again and ferry one last child to and fro school, tuition, extra classes. :roll: :lol:

      Wow, it sounded like a really peaceful and relaxing trip to Vietnam. I haven’t been there and would love to go one day soon! My X’Mas eve? It was quiet for my family, too, as we had an earlier Christmas Roast Turkey celebration at home on the 19the December, instead as my eldest daughter’s boyfriend had came down from Penang for a visit. After that, on the Chinese Winter Solstice Festival, I cooked again another big meal for dinner (Chinese one) and after that, I am all kaput! No more energy to cook. So, just ate out or buy take-outs.

      Now, it’s raining dogs and cats as I am typing this. It’s probably the same in your area, too. I just ta-pau Indian Rojak and Kentucky Fried Chicken for dinner, odd combo…but the rojak guy ran out of eggs and sotong.

      When you are ready, then only you visit her loh. Don’t worry about finding out what’s wrong in case…so far I know, she is the only one who can fix the problem in one or 2 sessions. Many people who couldn’t get cured else where or whose doctors had given up were healed by her. She’s already 62 years old and she keeps reminding me and her clients that we better go see her while she is still around…she also don’t know when she will “go” (pass away). :wink:

      Got to go now and have dinner. Good Night!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  12. 26

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    Hello there, dear friends :D

    I found a website that provides free herb information on Gotu Kola and have copied it here from http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/free-herb-information/gotu-kola.html

    It’s a long, long post with testimonials from people who had used the herb successfully and quickly to treat arthritis.

    Also, there is a fascinating story of a Chinese man who lived to about 200 years old who attributed his longevity to consuming gotu kola regularly. He also gave some valuable tips on how to live to a ripe, old age, too!

    Gotu Kola :-

    Description

    Perennial, creeping, ground cover, which roots at the nodes, as it spreads over the ground. Leaves, from 2-4cm wide, and kidney-shaped, with a v-shaped slot, where the leaf joins the stem: often with serrated margins, which gives them the appearance of miniature fans. Size of leaves can depend on climate, season, soil structure, fertility and growing position: whether in sun or shade.

    Small-sized leaves usually hug the ground and have a short petiole stem; however, large leaves can have a petiole up to 20cm long. When plants are grown in the shade, they tend to have large leaves and very long petioles. This petiole stem can have a pink/purple tinge. Pink flowers 5mm across, usually set 2 to 4, side by side, as an umbel, developing from the stem nodes.

    Flowers are so small (and often hidden underneath leaves) that, generally, the flower is not noticed at all. It is only under a microscope that the flower’s beauty is seen. Although gotu kola belongs to the umbel family of plants, now classified as Apiaceae, there is very little resemblance to other umbel plants: like parsley, dill, fennel and coriander. Seeds, of gotu kola, form in flat, oval capsules, usually containing two tiny, brown, kidneyshaped seeds.

    … … see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

    Sometimes, gotu kola is mistaken for Swamp Pennywort (Centella cordifolia); as its name suggests, it does like to grow in damp places. The leaves of this species can be slightly longer than broad, with sinuate or faintly crenate margins and minute, purple flowers.

    There are numerous other ‘look alike’ plants, that people have often brought to the herb farm to have identified, such as Kidney Weed (Dichondra repens), a herb with creeping roots, petiolled kidney-shaped leaves with scalloped margins; a traditional Chinese herb for fevers, dysentery, jaundice and to remove excess fluid from the body.

    Native Violet (Viola hederacea) (see p 342) similar size and shaped leaf, to gotu kola, with scallops, but both ends of the leaf tend to overlap, near the stem, and it bears lavender and white non-fragrant violets.

    Coast Pennywort (Hydrocotyle bonariensis) which has a creeping root; the leaf-stem is attached to the centre of the leaf with broad, scalloped margins. It is believed to have been introduced into Australia, from South America, where it has had traditional use for urinary disorders and as an antiinflammatory.

    Alehoof (Glecoma hederacea) a hardy, creeping, ground cover, with dainty, kidney-shaped leaves and crenate margins: these can be used as salad greens, medicinally for colds and as a liver tonic (see p 23). Other plants that have a visual resemblance to gotu kola are several Ranunculus species, which have similar leaf formation; and other Hydrocotyle species.

    Before using gotu kola, it is important to make sure that it is the correct plant. I remember, several years ago, when a lady told me she had been using the native violet for some time, thinking it was gotu kola. She said “No wonder I was not getting rid of my arthritic pain”.
    … … see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

    Constituents: volatile oil containing vallerin, camphor, cineole, n-dodecane, terpene acetate, tran-B farnesene, germacrene-D, B-caryophyllene, p-cymol, a-pinene, methanol, allyl mustard oil; flavonoids, kaempferol, resin, alkaloid hydrocotyline; asiatic, betulic, brahmic, centellinic, isobrahmic, and madecassic acid; quercetin, tannin, sugar, asiaticoside, oxyasiaticoside, brahmoside, braminoside, centelloside, madecassoside, thunkuniside, bitters, sterols, pectin, B-sitosterol
    Vitamins:

    A, B, C, D
    Minerals:

    calcium, chromium, cobalt, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, selenium, silica, zinc
    Actions:

    antipyretic, diuretic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiinflammatory, sedative, antispasmodic, antioxidant, adaptogenic, tonic, digestive, vulnerary, alterative, antiviral, antibiotic, nervine, rejuvenative, blood purifier, adrenal strengthener
    Medicinal Uses

    Gotu kola has been known for centuries, valued for treating leprosy and tuberculosis; relieving the pain of rheumatism and arthritis; to increase brain capacity; and for longevity, often being called, the elixir of life. A legendary saying, in reference to gotu kola was: ‘2 leaves a day, keeps old age away’.

    In Sinhalese culture, they valued the herb to strengthen and revitalize worn out bodies and brains; eating 2-3 leaves a day to bring about a gradual return to health and strength, provided that the body is exposed to the sun, for a time, each day.

    In Ancient China, the herb was a principal ingredient in an elixir called ‘fo ti tieng’, a mixture that was called the fountain of youth. Many herbalists have called gotu kola: the finest of all herb tonics. It appears, they say, to have no equal in the treatment of general debility and decline. Digestion is strengthened (no doubt aided by the bitter properties) and food better utilized, with the process of overall metabolism, increased.

    Gotu kola has been called ‘a pharmacy in one herb’, offering impressive benefits. In India, gotu kola is a traditional remedy for skin conditions, wounds and bruises. With controlled tests, in which an extract of gotu kola was applied, to 20 people, suffering with slow healing wounds: 64% of the wounds healed completely and 16% improved considerably.

    At Sydney University, research on wound healing is being carried out, following invitro studies on the herb. It is one of the most important, rejuvenating herbs in Ayurvedic medicine, particularly valued for: revitalising nerve and brain cells, promoting calmness and clarity, helping poor memory and lack of concentration, increasing meditation ability and to help balance the left and right hemispheres of the brain.

    Valued as a brain food, for improving intelligence and reflexes, it has been a herb students have used for: renewing mental alertness, clarity, and energy levels, without the ‘jitteriness’ some people may experience with coffee. It can be used throughout life. Gotu kola contains neither caffeine, nor theobromine.

    It was the life history of the renowned Chinese herbalist Professor Li Chung Yun, who lived to the age of 256 years (having outlived 23 wives) which made the western world aware of the true value of herbs for longevity. Herbs he recommended, most highly, were gotu kola and ginseng.

    He was born in 1677 and in 1933 the New York Times announced the death of this remarkable Oriental, whose life span had reached over two and a half centuries. The Chinese Government officially recorded his age. Professor Li, at the age of 200 years still gave courses of lectures for 28 weeks at a time, each lecture on longevity lasting 3 hours, at a Chinese University.

    Those who learned from him, declared that he did not appear older that a man of 50, standing straight, strong and had his own natural teeth and head of hair. Besides recommending life-extending herbs, his lectures gave clear-cut guidelines, for those who wished to enjoy a long life. He stressed; one should never be in a hurry … take it easy … take your time.

    He taught his students to sit as calmly as a tortoise, walk as sprightly as a bird, and sleep as soundly as a dog. He advocated avoiding extremes of emotion of all kinds, especially as a person grows older, as nothing drains energy from the body as rapidly, or disrupts the functional harmony of vital organs, as completely, as stress or strong outbursts of emotion.

    Daily physical exercise and deep breathing was important, as also was a simple, primarily vegetarian, diet; and on hot, summer nights, over-eating should be avoided (as it causes stagnation of the blood and lowered energy). On cold, winter mornings, extra quantities of nourishing foods should be eaten, to provide the extra essence and energy the body required, for keeping warm.

    It is said that in the Orient, where gotu kola is primarily regarded as a herb for longevity, there are many recorded examples of unusual longevity, attained by those who used the plant, regularly. Elephants seek out gotu kola as a favourite food. Could it be that the strength of the animal, the unfailing memory and its long life, are due to regular consumption of the herb?

    After Li Chung Yun’s death in 1933, numerous research projects explored the properties of gotu kola and undertook various trials, with wound healing, duodenal ulcers, to enhance memory skills, tumours, etc. In India, scientific documentation of clinical tests, by Dr.M.V.R. Appa Ras and his associates, showed increased mental activity of children in the trials. Fifteen, mentally retarded children were given a 500mg tablet of powdered gotu kola daily.

    After trials of three months, the children showed increased powers of attention and concentration, considerably above that of the fifteen children in the placebo group. Results also showed significant increase in IQ (4.6%), general ability, with improved behavioural patterns and expression, communication and co-operation.

    Biochemical studies revealed, gotu kola benefited the replacement rate of biogenic amines: the chemicals in our brains which act as neuro-transmitters, involved in learning and memory process.

    … … see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

    Gotu kola has always been known as a remarkable herb with a multitude of uses, and of special benefit for chronic, degenerative diseases. As one of it’s common names implies, ‘Indian Ginseng’, it is similar to ginseng in its actions. In fact, some herbalists regard gotu kola as highly as ginseng, and more affordable: besides, it is easy to grow.

    Note, gotu kola is not Withania somnifera, which also has the common name of Indian ginseng (see p 141). I always find it most interesting, when I dig a plant, that may be 3 to 5 years or more of age, that the root has a resemblance to ginseng root, and to the torso of the human body. This indicates a doctrine of signatures significance, of ‘like cures like’, a herb which benefits so many ailments of the body.

    Throughout history, gotu kola has been used for a wide range of health problems, which have included:

    ADD, peptic ulcers, auto-immune, diseases, stress, gynaecological, disorders, asthma, low thyroid, function, neuritits, male tonic, menopausal, problems, eczema, scrofula, venereal diseases, cirrhosis, diarrhea, high blood pressure, larangitis, stomach ache, muscular atrophy, fatigue, sore throat, schizophrenia, thrombosis, brain tonic, respiratory ailments, influenza, blood purifier, food poisoning, vaginitis, diabetes, baldness, wounds, age spots, nervous break down, poor circulation, insomnia, retinal detachment, dysentry, liver problems, to increase energy, epilepsy, pleurisy, premenstrual pain, hair loss, blood disorders, mycosis fungoides, dementia, infections, peridontal disease, colds, coughing blood, vomitting blood, senility, hemorrhoids, prickly heat rash, measles,

    poor appetite, atherosclerosis, depression, skin ulcers, urinary tract infection, candida, tuberculosis, mental retardation, sexual debility, elephantitis, fibrocystic breast disease, gastric, hypochondria, ankylosing spondylitis, skin ulcers, failing eyesight, abscesses, mouth ulcers, for impotence, stomach upsets, bruises, scleroderma, herpes, cramps, exam tonic, lupus, bowel disorders, fluid retention, hepatitis, swollen glands, intestinal worms, convulsions, surgical wounds, dermatitis, joint mobility, bowel disorders, anemia, hardening of, arteries, tingling in legs, to stimulate the liver,, bladder, kidneys, stimulate central, nervous system.

    Many people have been able to correct high blood pressure, with consistent use of the herb. Research from the U.S. National Institute on Ageing, showed that high blood pressure can lead to atrophy and shrinkage of the brain. The study also showed, that: years of high blood pressure raises the amount of a liquid, known as cerebrospinal fluid, inside the skull, and lowers the amount of white matter. Who wants less white matter?

    Gotu kola’s constituents have a strong blood purifying action, and help to lower serum cholesterol levels; this could be mainly due to the action of Beta-sitosterol. The plant saponins help the function of the immune system, by assisting in breaking down the walls of diseased cells, making microbes easier to kill. It seems likely, that it is this same action that has been seen in research, which works to kill the leprosy bacteria by dissolving the waxy, protective substance around the bacteria.
    … … see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

    Over twenty years ago, my herbal mentor shared with me the benefits of gotu kola to relieve arthritis. As I did not suffer with arthritis, myself, I could not speak from experience of the benefits. However, I did share this information, when I was asked to speak to groups, in lectures, and for people who came to learn at the farm and in herb courses.

    Over the years, I have had outstanding feedback from people who tried it and experienced relief from pain. They also shared this information with friends, and people in pain whom they met. There was always a steady stream of people visiting the herb farm, … “for the plant that could relieve arthritis” and gotu kola became the most called for herb. Doctors recommended it to their patients. People ordered it be posted to their aged parents. Friends told friends, who had fingers crippled with arthritis.

    Arthritis has been recognised as the single, largest and identified cause of disability and handicap in Australia, now affecting over 2.6 million people. It is an inflammatory condition of the joints (which can be of the fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees, spine and toes) with symptoms of pain, swelling, stiffness and deformity. It may appear suddenly or come on gradually, with a toothache-like pain or sharp burning or grinding pain.

    There are many different forms arthritis can take. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease is related to the wear and tear of ageing, and involves the deterioration of the cartilage, at the end of the bones. The once-smooth cartilage becomes rough, resulting in friction; tendons, ligaments and muscles, holding the joints together, become weaker, and there is severe pain, stiffness and deformity.

    Rheumatoid arthritis, an auto-immune disease, is inflammation affecting the synovial membranes. Cartilage and tissue, surrounding the lubricating fluid in the joints, can be destroyed. The body replaces this damaged tissue with scar tissue, causing the spaces between the joints to become narrow, to develop folds and to fuse together.

    There is stiffness, swelling, anemia, weight loss, and often crippling pain, with loss of mobility to carry out normal activity, which means the quality of life becomes greatly reduced. Gout can be classed as another form of arthritis, which attacks the smaller joints of the feet and hands, depositing crystallised uric acid salts in the joints causing swelling, redness, a sensation of heat and extreme pain. People, who wished to be free of these painful, debilitating diseases, have taken the herb. After a period of weeks to months, they usually experience a lessening of pain and disability: some report a complete cure.

    Many years ago, I was teaching a herb course at the TAFE College. In the first week, I took into class a box of gotu kola plants, to ask if there might be someone in the group suffering with arthritis, who would like to use it daily, and report back their experiences at the end of the 6 weeks. Immediately, a lady indicated she would like to trial the herb.

    At the end of the course, she excitedly shared with everyone in the class, that she did not feel fatigue like she used to at the end of the day. This was despite a heavy schedule, with a busy and demanding business, and that she felt more relaxed and the arthritic pain was gone. For years, she had not been able to take the rings off her fingers because of swollen joints, but after taking gotu kola for several weeks, was able to remove her rings again.

    A retired gentleman heard about gotu kola, from his wife who came to do the herb course. He was sceptical, but decided to try it, anyway. To his amazement, after 10 days, his swollen, arthritic hands felt a loosening and ease of pain. He called around soon after, to share this with me: lifting his arm above his head, and waving it around with ease, something, he said, he had not been able to do for a long time.

    Recently, a lass called for gotu kola, which she wanted to give to a friend of 22 years of age, who had severe arthritis. She knows it is effective, as previously when she was nursing, she met a lady of 102 years who ate it daily. If this centenarian did not eat the leaves regularly, she would have arthritic pain back again.

    Many people have shared with me, how they have been relieved of arthritis by chewing a couple of leaves of gotu kola, daily. Some people experience benefits within several weeks. For others, consistent use for 3 to 12 months has given results, and for a few people they found they needed to build up to 5 – 6 or more leaves, before they felt a lessening in symptoms. Note, that a two-leaf-daily dose, refers to leaves the size of a fifty-cent piece, so if the leaves are smaller, more leaves need to be taken to give the same amount.

    Knowledge is powerful, particularly when it comes to knowing what gotu kola may achieve. A man heard me on ABC radio, ‘Herb of the Week’ program. He was most interested, as he had suffered with very swollen, painful wrists, for a long time, and all drugs prescribed, gave no improvement.

    He found some gotu kola, used it, and four weeks later, his wrists were normal in size and free of pain. A lady, in Victoria, ordered some plants to be sent by post, as she was desperate to get some relief, from the rheumatoid arthritis that had crippled her for 25 years. She described the pain she was in as: ‘hell’. She also suffered high blood pressure. After 2 weeks of using the leaves, nearly all pain was gone, her blood pressure had normalised and she could sleep almost the whole night, through.

    Another lady rang, desiring relief from her arthritic condition, which had virtually made her wheelchair bound. Her hands were deformed like claws; she could not write. Massive doses of cortisone had done little to relieve the intense pain, nor had any other treatment she had tried. She started to cut up the leaves, that I posted to her, with a parsley chopper and had a good pinch of dried, chopped leaves on her muesli, each morning.

    Within a short period of time, she was free of pain and back riding her horses, and, as long as she takes the herb daily, she has no pain. If she runs out of leaves and goes without, even for a few days, the pain returns. A security guard suffered with severe arthritis, and in the mornings, could hardly move. He started eating 2 leaves a day and, after a short period of time, he was entirely free of pain. Another person, after 2 weeks on the herb, found total relief from pain. He shared his findings with a friend, who could hardly lift a cup of tea. The friend experienced relief in 3 months and was able to lead an active life again. A man, who had prostate cancer, was told about gotu kola. He started eating leaves, each day, with amazing results: he no longer had the problem.

    A man, who was a professional bike rider, was struck down by severe arthritis and could not ride, anymore. He took gotu kola for several weeks with amazing pain relief and was then able to ride again.
    … … see How can I use HERBS in my daily life? for full text.

    Gotu kola has been life-enhancing for many people, and that is why I am sharing this knowledge with you. So many people, have shared with me, how valuable gotu kola has been in their lives. There is an old proverb that says … ‘when someone shares with you, something of value, and you derive a benefit from it, you have an obligation to share it with others’. Will you also, help to share this knowledge, so that others may be relieved of pain?

    For many people, gotu kola has made life worth living, again. I have shared these true-life incidents, to encourage other people suffering pain, that pain, chronic or otherwise, may not need to be part of their lives. And, what could be simpler than eating a couple of leaves each day?

  13. 27

    cina_fong said,

    Morning Choesf

    Ha! I was just thinking of what to call the dread feeling when its nearing to school re-open haha… ‘Pre School Year Depression’ or “School Re-opening Stress Syndrome’, having to wake up at 6am to make breakfast and ferrying the kid to and fro school, tuition etc etc like a headless chicken.

    I realised that the Centella Asiatica specie does not grow as fast as the other specie or maybe its because I kept plucking them and my few pots always look sparse and a little ‘botak’. I have 4 pots of it plus some on the ground and they are growing nicely. Hopefully one day they cover some space in my backyard.

    This weekend I will make it a point to look out for the pegaga in the wet market that I frequent as I have not seen them.

    cina

    • 28

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear Cina :D

      Hahaha…you knew exactly what I meant when I said I get stressed as the date schools reopen gets nearer and nearer….I have called myself a ‘headless chicken” many times …. :lol:

      After reading the free herb information on pegaga above…I am beginning to think that I may be consuming Pegaga China most of the time (the commercial ones). I copied the excerpt below –

      There are numerous other ‘look alike’ plants, that people have often brought to the herb farm to have identified, such as Kidney Weed (Dichondra repens), a herb with creeping roots, petiolled kidney-shaped leaves with scalloped margins; a traditional Chinese herb for fevers, dysentery, jaundice and to remove excess fluid from the body.

      I wonder what is a “scalloped margin” :?: More indentations like the Commercial Pegaga.

      I Googled for some images of Kidney Weed here :-

      http://www.google.com.my/images?um=1&hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&biw=1152&bih=545&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=kidney+weeds&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

      Now, identifying the Centelle Asiatica can be quite confusing.

      In that case, I better buy the Centella Asiatica or Pegaga Kampung only to maximise health benefits. I found a Malay stall whose lady boss said she has a lot of Pegaga Kampung and all I need to do is just order in advance from her and she will bring some to the market the next day. :idea:

      I now have 3 small pots of Pegaga Kampung….will probably have to wait for a long time before I can consume 2 to 3 leaves daily. Meanwihle, I will boil the market-bought pegaga about every 10 days or so.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  14. 29

    cinafong said,

    Morning Choesf

    Once you have the actual Centella Asiatica, do you notice that others pale in comparison in terms of appearance. It is similar yet distinctive I can’t explain it maybe I am bias cuz I love this ‘weed’ haha… I have to remind myself to look for it in the market this weekend.

    The other day I saw Centella Asiatica cultivated for sale in a temple compound and I bought a pot eventhough I have a few already :) So far I have seen many varieties in nurseries being sold as ‘edible pegagal.

    Are you planning anything fancy for New Year’s Eve tomorrow night? Scary time pass so fast , Choesf.

    cina

    • 30

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear cina :D

      Heheh, I have nothing planned for New Year’s Eve tonight. We usually don’t celebrate it much – to us, it is just another year passing by. But we will celebrate in a big way with the welcoming of the Chinese New Year though. Yes, time passes by so fast…when I was a kid, I used to wonder what those older ladies said about “the older you are, the faster time flies. In Cantonese, they will say “blink an eye, pass a year!” :lol:

      Now that you mentioned it – you are right. This morning, I went to look my Pegaga plants – I have both the kampung and the commercial ones – the kampung one (I hope it is Centella Asiatica) has more vibrant, darker colours and are thicker in the leaves, whereas the commercial one has more “flimsy” leaves.

      Wishing you a wonderful and blessed Happy New Year 2011, cina! :D

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  15. 31

    cinafong said,

    Choesf

    Yes, the Centella Asiatica is like a real diamond or LV, there’s a distinct difference if you know what to look for hehe…

    I am a little groggy and bloated from last night celebration :P
    Usually I will log in the morning and have a chat with my sister via MSN chat but missed her today because I woke up late… our time difference is 12 hrs but it is still nice to be able to connect with anyone anywhere in this digital age isn’t it!

    cina

    • 32

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good afternoon, dear cina :D

      A cup of hot Japanese green tea would be good to refresh the body after a night of wonderful indulgence! I especially love the OSK brand of Japanese green tea in satchets. :wink: My family had a quiet night after 2 days of shopping and after having our meals at shopping malls, I decided to cook a simple dinner of white porridge to go with some side dishes – heheh, something like having lunch at dinner. Sometimes, we have breakfast for dinner, too – bacon, eggs, sausages, toasts, orange juice. :lol:

      My Hokkien Porridge Lunch

      Centella Asiatica is better than gold and diamonds – can keep us healthy and youthful ! :lol:

      Yesterday, I read in The Star newspaper about a 101 years old man in Malaysia looking for a wife for companionship. Although he is blind, his mind is still sharp and his memory good. He attributed his good health and longevity to eating daily fresh vegetables and herbs which include the pegaga, petai. Here’s the article –

      101-year old man looking for life partner

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  16. 33

    cinafong said,

    Morning Choesf, congratulations on the success of your blog, very impressive numbers. I guess your posts are informative and helpful and relates to people worldwide and it circulates by word of mouth and emails :)

    Yes, you are right, you can’t do much with diamonds, can only keep them in storage. If my husband were to buy me a diamond, my first reaction wld be ‘what a waste of money’ thats why he never buys me diamonds :) My mother in law gave me a diamond to welcome me into the family just before i got married though, that was really nice of her. She is really wonderful and so is my father in law. I am very fortunate.

    I am feeling much better now, just not used to late nights and drinking much nowadays. One time I went on a 7 day detox program and when I had my first normal meal, I got so sick it was just terrible, found out that I had severe sodium and MSG overdose, and that was just on one plate of rice with some meat and vege dishes ‘tapau’ from outside.

    cina..

    • 34

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good evening, dear cina :D

      Ah, a very hectic day for me …now only have some time to reply to the comments here…my apologies :oops:

      Thank you so much for your congratulations …heheh, you are one of those people that helped made my blog a success. :D

      I’m glad you are feeling better now. I noticed that as our health gets better, whenever we have a late night binge of food and alcohol, we suffer even more the next day. A few years ago, my hubby and I would go for drinks in pubs on Friday and after that, we usually had late night suppers…the next day, we woke up a little later and we were okay. These days, cannot tahan already…drink a little wine with dinner, sure next day will have a slight hangover already. :lol:

      Yes, I got diamonds from my late mother-in-law also when I got married to her son…sigh…now they are sitting in the safe deposit box in the bank. With the robberies so rampant these days, we can’t wear them out safely. Last year, my hubby surprised me on our wedding anniversary by giving me a gift, with a card from Poh Kong Jewellers. I was so excited but then I blurted out – “Can wear or not ah?” – meaning if it’s cheap enough for me to wear it daily safely….many years ago, that same question would have meant “Is it good and expensive enough in value for me to wear?” :lol: :lol: :roll:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  17. 35

    cina_fong said,

    I know exactly what you mean. In our younger days when my husband and I justed to go for happy hours with friends almost every evening after work and thereafter, we would be happily having late dinner or supper at one of our favourite ‘dai chow’ or mamak stalls by the road side in Petaling St or Jln Imbi or PJ area and we hv no problem getting to work the next morning. Now its a terrifying thought to stay up late drinking or having supper late at night. haha..

    Looks like going to rain this evening. Sunday evenings can bring a feeling of dread and gloom does it not… I used to feel like that on Sundays whenever I thought of having to go back to work on Mondays and when I was still struggling to find my path..

    cina

    • 36

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear Cina :D

      Heheh, nowadays supper and staying up late are out for me and hubby already….adequate sleep and watching our weight are more important. :lol:

      It is very breezy with cool air now – a really refreshing and comforting change from our usual hot, humid weather. Hope it can stay longer like this before the normal CNY hot weather hits us. Yep, tell me about the Monday blues when we know we have to get back to work the following Monday and having to start the week all over … :roll: :lol: Nowadays, it’s just having to wake up earlier for our schoolgoing children but after that, it is pretty much up us to pass our day. :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 38

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there and welcome, dear Vanna :D

      Thank you for posting here on the availability of canned pennywort drinks in Washington. (Is that Washington, DC or Washington state?) That’s really convenient! :D

      Personally, I believe the canned drink version of pennywort will still contain some health benefits although not as much as the fresh leaves that are eaten raw or brewed. Here in Malaysia (South East Asia), we have many types of health drinks which are sold in canned forms, too and those people who are busy will find that convenient.

      One way to find out is to consume the canned pennywort drinks over 2 weeks and observe any benefits that you may experience during that period – like your facial complexion is better and glowing, some usual aches and pains are diminishing, lesser skin irritations/itching, etc. I am also eager to know your findings, too. :wink:

      With best wishes for good health,

      choesf :D

  18. 39

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    Hello there, dear friends :D

    Today, I brought my husband to my lady healer friend for treatment and I finally remembered to ask her why I get headaches when I have the pegaga drink. She said that is due to my body being dehydrated and lacking water intake. So, that confirmed what the Malay lady told me earlier that I need to drink more water if I get headaches after drinking pegaga. :idea:

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  19. 40

    l said,

    Where will i get in Singapore? in the local market?

  20. 42

    presa1200 said,

    i found your blog by chance and it’s so fascinating to read. imo, the antioxidants and enzymes in pegaga will be destroyed if you boil/heat them. i think the best way is to blend them into juice and add some pure honey to mask the bitterness, please avoid using sugar if possible. use agave nectar or something similar, you don’t wanna put more sugar into your body.

    thanks for sharing, btw.

    • 43

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear presa1200 :D

      Thank you for your comments and tips on consuming pegaga. Yes, the best way to consume pegaga is to blend them into juice. I like the idea of putting honey instead of sugar. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  21. 44

    presa1200 said,

    that’s right, you should keep the fresh pegaga in the fridge and consume them immediately after blending, antioxidants will slowly diminish over time. i haven’t grown my own pegaga that’s why i have to buy from mydin usj or the pasar pagi at shah alam.

    i mix my pegaga juice with original wild forest honey (Tualang) and it tastes so good

    • 45

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hello there, dear presa1200 :D

      I read that any thing juiced should be consumed asap, even within minutes, so that the antioxidants and goodness are not diminished.

      For my family, I find it easier to follow the “boiling” method – pegaga with honey dates. I find this more soothing to the body….and also, I don’t have to juice the pegaga so many times daily. My kids found the juiced version really yucky! :lol:

      Thank you for letting us know where you got your pegaga from – this will come in handy for the visitors here. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  22. 46

    Judy said,

    Hi Choesf,

    I just found your website and wonderful article on Pennywort. I have been looking for it without success in NYC for two years since I first tried it on vacation in Sri Lanka. I LOVED it but couldn’t find it anywhere at all.

    Now, thank god, I will be moving to Singapore where they do have Pennywort! Can you please tell me where you buy it? I’ll be staying in the Orchard area but will travel to get it.

    I am so glad I am coming to your country — you have no idea how happy this makes me!!!!

    Cheers,

    Elizabeth

    • 47

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there and welcome, dear Elizabeth :D

      Thank you for your kind comments. I’m sorry for the late reply as I was busy with some guests staying at my home for the past 2 weeks. :oops:

      I’m glad you will be moving to Singapore and can get this Indian Pennywort easily. Heheh, I am not from Singapore but “next door”, i.e. Malaysia. If you visit the link below and follow the thread there, you will find some places to buy this herb (also known as Gotu Kola) :-

      http://www.greenculturesg.com/forum/index.php?/topic/20105-real-gotu-kola/

      With best wishes for good health,

      choesf :D

  23. 48

    Thank you for a well written and informative article. I will make it as a soup.

  24. 49

    Theresa said,

    Hi Happy,

    I was lead to your wonderful blog when I was checking up on the benefits of the burdock root. I now have a number of bottles of citrus enzymes fermenting away. The oldest bottle is now at one month maturity. But, I just can not wait for another two months to harvest it to test out its amazing cleaning power. Hence, in the meantime, I had been making the rice enzyme, and am using it for washing my dishes, which comes out squeaky clean. I also spray it on the cooking area when the cooker hub had cool down after cooking to clean it. It works wonderfully without the usual chemical smell from using ‘JIF ‘ cleaner as I did before seeing your blog. I used it to clean my shower tiles and floor with good results. It also worked on the urine stain at the base of the toilet and on the wall tiles next to it.

    I have been drinking the Duan Pegaga juice(blended) every morning on an empty stomach for the pass week. I noticed that the skin on my heels became very smooth now. The heels which used to look and feel very dry and ruf is now nice and smooth. I have yet to notice other results. But, I am not sure if the Daun Pegaga leaf that I bought from Little India in Singapore, and in JB, Malaysia is the correct type of leaf because it is round. Nothing like the pictures that you showed on your blog. Can I email you a picture of the herb that I had been using? Where can I send it to? Your email address? Please advise.
    :) Theresa

  25. 52

    Theresa said,

    Thank you for the link. Yes, the pegaga leaf that I’d bought is exactly like the leafs in the link. Did you say that this is the real Kampung pegaga? I thought that it is suppose to be of kidney shape.

    Post entry #5 above from Cina, she said to “Make sure that we do not consume the specie very commonly found in nurseries that is of round shaped with scalloped edges. That is more of an ornamental plant.” The pegaga leaf that I bought, like the ones in the link, is of round shape with scalloped edges. I hope that I have not been blending the ornamental leafs for drinking. Can you confirm for me? I took a photo of the pegaga leaf that I bought, but, not sure how to attach it to show you. Any hint?

    I am also wondering how you alternate between when to take which type of these medicinal herbal leafs that you mentioned in your blog. And your drinkable enzyme. Are you still taking the leaf from the ‘Magic plant?’

    Sweet dream. Good night.

    • 53

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear Theresa :D

      At first, I thought you meant your round leaf was the round edge, kidney shaped pegaga. But after I posted my comment, I then realise that you could mean the circular shaped pegaga :oops: and so, I gave you the link to the image of the circular shaped pegaga.. The 2 types of Daun Pegaga I take are of the 2 varieties but both are kidney shaped – one had sharp edges, whereas the other type has a smoother edge and this smoother edged type is the actual Daun Pegaga used for medicinal purposes. The totally circular or round shaped leaf you mentioned is another type of Pennywort or Pegaga, which I have not taken before but I read someone ate them also.

      I will email you to get the photo from you just to clarify which type of pegaga you took. :wink:

      Heheh, I wrote about so many types of healing drinks and soups and I was wondering if someone will actually come out and ask me how to take them all together! :lol: :oops:

      After I found the Miracle Vegetable Soup, I stopped making the drinking enzymes as my husband and children really hated the taste. The vege soup is cheaper in cost and very effective for many ailments and for good health also and most importantly, my family didn’t mind drinking that.

      Just started 2 weeks ago, I now take a cup of the boiled Magic Plant (Lam Fei Yip) first thing in the morning because somehow for this year, I keep having stomach problems (Like bloatedness, wind, heartburn, etc) and I found that taking the Magic Plant drink helps to make my stomach function well the whole day.

      Yesterday, I made a large pot of “Black Faced General” or “Hark Meen Jeong Kuan” with 3 Loh Hon Kor for my family to drink. I have yet to blog about this herb but it is very well known for its anti-cancer and anti-toxins properties. My healer friend says it’s good for preventing cervical cancer for women as well. This, my family will drink 1 cup a day until the whole herbal drink is finished. Then I will make another type of health drink, like the boiled pegaga – again, my family will drink this one cup a day.

      The vege soup, I will try to boil twice a week but sometimes, it is just once a week and one pot can last us 2 days in consumption. Whatever drinks we take for health, best is to keep them at least 4 hours apart to avoid any clash or contraindication of their medicinal properties. :idea:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 54

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hi there, dear Theresa :D

        Thank you for showing me your pegaga leaf picture – ah, now I know what you meant when you described the leaf.

        When I first went hunting for pegaga by going to the plant nurseries to buy a pot, I was shown the same one you had and when I told the boss of a plant nursery that I wanted to eat the pegaga leaves for health, she said the round leaf type that she has for sale is for ornamental and can’t be eaten. She told me to go to the wet market and buy Daun Pegaga from Malay stalls. She said the medicinal ones are kidney-shaped and have thinner leaves.

        I went looking around in the Internet and found a little information on the types of Pennywort :-

        http://www.helpfulgardener.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=31617

        The one your husband bought is called “Hydrocotyle verticillata/vulgaris ” and is the round shaped type, as shown in the first picture above.

        The second picture shown there is the round edged, kidney shaped type called “Cantella asiatica “, the actual pegaga or pennywort that we take for health.

        Do have a wonderful evening!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  26. 55

    Theresa said,

    Dear Choesf,

    Thank you for your replies. :) Now I know that I had been using the wrong Pegaga herbal leaf for blending into juice for drinking. I suppose that if the vegetable stalls sells it, then it should be edible.

    To any of your readers to this blog that happens to be from Singapore, do you know where I can buy the real duan pegaga herb?

    Have a nice day ahead.

    ~Theresa

  27. 57

    Theresa said,

    Hi Choesf,

    I finally bought a pot of the real pegaga plant, Centella Asiatica, from the World Farm today for S$5.00. Now my problem is how to keep it growing because I stay in an apartment without any balcony. The pot of pegaga is now sitting on a rack at the window sil in my kitchen.

    ~Theresa

    • 58

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear Theresa :D

      I’m glad you managed to buy a pot of the pegaga plant. I heard it is okay to grow it in the shade, so the window sill should be okay, I guess. I am still trying to grow some at home but so far, it has not been a success – either the snails or my cats would eat up all the leaves! “lol:

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  28. 59

    happyhomemaker88 said,

    Hi there, dear friends :D

    I received a lovely link to Youtube from blog visitor, Theresa, and it shows a beautiful, healthy pot of pegaga and also an innovative way of growing pegaga in a pot :-

    Thank you, Theresa, for sending me that link! :wink:

    With best wishes,

    choesf :D

  29. 60

    Theresa said,

    Hi Choesf,

    I hope the youtube video will help you keep your cat from eating up your pegaga leaves.

    After watching the video, I took a good look at my pot of pegaga because the lady in the video said that she grown her plant from seeds.

    I find that there are small flowers some of the nodes. And that there are some clusters of seeds that formed after the flower had finished blooming. I will save some of the seeds, dried them up in the shade and see if I can plant a pot with it. If it works, I can send some of these seeds to family and friends. I had check at the nurseries that I went to when I was looking to purchase a pot of the pegaga plant. The nurseries here do not carry pegaga seeds.

    Have a wonderful Sunday rest with your family.

    ~Theresa

    • 61

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear Theresa :D

      Yes, the Youtube video you sent was certainly very helpful. :wink:

      I was told that the pegaga plants are very easy to plant – just cut off the leaves for eating and after that just put the stems and roots into another pot of soil to plant. Can even put into a glass of water first to allow more roots to grow and then transplant. I have no problem planting new ones…just that the small snails and cats kept eating the leaves away. I need to buy a big, sturdy and well=rooted pot of pegaga from the nurseries nearby.

      By the way, which nursery did you buy your pot of pegaga from? I have someone from Singapore who is asking where she can buy hers?

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 62

        Theresa said,

        Hi Choesf,

        I bought my pot of Pegaga plant from the WORLD FARM nursery in Singapore. It sells for $5.00 a pot. It is a hugh nursery so it is best to ask the staff there where to locate it. Here is their address: 15 Bah Soon Pah Road, 15 Bah Soon Pah Road, (S)769962, Tel: 62574437

        They should call and ask for their opening hours first. I had to make two trips because the first time that I went, the nursery was closed.

      • 63

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Good morning, dear Theresa :D

        Thank you so much for the details on where to buy potted pegaga plants. My friends will be so happy to have that information. It is quite cheap for S$5 a pot. :D

        Do have a wonderful day!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  30. 64

    Felicia said,

    Hi sister choesf,

    Is it safe to consume if I have acid reflux or gastric problem? Forgot if I have ask you this question before..Hehe…

    • 65

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear sister Felicia :D

      So far, I didn’t experience any problems in stomach when eating the fresh leaves. If making the drinks, blended or brewed, it’s better to drink them at room temperature if we have stomach problems. :idea:

      Maybe you may like to confirm with Master atan if pegaga is safe for those with acid reflux or gastric problems. :wink:

      These days, I also get some acid reflux and stomach bloatedness. :roll:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  31. 66

    Felicia said,

    Good morning Sister Choesf,

    Thanks for the prompt reply…I have checked out with World Farm Nursery and they do sell this plant…They sell by their scientific name i.e. Centella Asiatica. One pot costs S$6.00. The nursery is quite far and is better to travel by car. The nursery seems to sell many interesting plants…I will try to find sometime to go there and get this plant. Thanks again!

    • 67

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear sister Felicia :D

      I’m so glad you managed to find potted pegaga plants. Yes, that is the correct scientific name of the plant ===> Centella Asiatica. :wink:

      I still haven’t got my potted pegaga yet…so far, I am still buying the harvested ones from the wet market. I tried to plant some as per Master atan’s advice, but they grow too slowly for my consumption and my cats and snails ate up the leaves faster than I did! :roll: :lol:

      I, too, must try to find the potted ones at the nurseries here in Sg Buloh, which is quite far for me also. :idea:

      Oh, regarding the question about adding the pegaga leaves into your fresh salad….I never count ed :oops: but if you follow the cucumber/tomato salad/salsa recipe I gave you, put in about 20 leaves and then you can eat the salad over a few times. :idea:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  32. 68

    Felicia said,

    Hi Sister Choesf,

    Forgot to ask you..If I add on into my raw salad with dressing, how many leaves should I use to mix together with the other types of greens?

  33. 69

    Felicia said,

    Hi Sister Choesf,

    I have managed to purchase a pot of pegaga leaves…from the Nursery you have recommended…Costs $6 a pot. Plan to make a bowl of fresh salad with some of the pegaga leaves added into it. As per my yesterday query, how many leaves can I add in together with the rest of the salad leaves?..I will use thousand island as the dressing…

    • 70

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Hi there, dear sister Felicia :D

      I’m glad you managed to buy a pot of pegaga leaves…all thanks and credit go to Theresa for providing the information of that nursery. :wink:

      Try and eat one leaf yourself to see how you like the taste…it can be a little bit bitter. Half my family members can eat them raw, whereas the other half insists on the boiled version.

      Perhaps, you can start with 3 leaves per person…so, if you are preparing the salad for 5, then you add 15 leaves. :idea:

      With best wishes,.

      choesf :D

  34. 71

    Felicia said,

    Hi Sister Choesf,

    Yes, credit goes to Theresa… Thank you Theresa for your tip!

    Thanks for the advice on my query…I will try…Actually, I am trying to be brave to try to eat it as due to my acid reflux,,,I always have the fear to try anything which is ‘alien’. Haha! I shall pick up the courage to do it and will feedback to you….Maybe for a start by mixing with other greens in my salad! Haha!

    Thanks again!

  35. 72

    Theresa said,

    Hello Choesf,
    :D, I am glad that the infomation was helpful for Felicia. I had made a trellis with some wire for my pot of pegaga so that the vines can creep up. That way, the long vines does not have to be all bunched up on the surface of the soil.

    When I first bought my pot of pegaga, I was cutting 3 to 4 leafs along with its stalk. I chose the largest leafs to cut. I would blend it, leafs and stalk, with some cold water, stir in a teaspoon or two of rock sugar syrup every morning to drink. But, for the last three days, I had been using the circular pegaga leaf that I bought from Little India instead because the leafs on my pot of pegaga was a little small in size. I am giving my plant a break so that it can grow.

    Good night.

    ~Theresa

    • 73

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear Theresa :D

      Ah, that sure is a good tip – making a trellis to encourage the pegaga plants to grow up. :Thank you for the idea! :idea:

      Yes, it is good to give your plants a break from harvesting. Since you have found the totally round type of pegaga to work for you, you have an alternative supply to take. :wink:

      Yesterday, I managed to buy the Centella Asiatica from the wet market – I bought 10 bunches, which weigh around 1 kg and I boiled them (with roots and all) with some honey rock sugar. Now I have about 5 litres of boiled pegaga drink to last my family for 5 days to a week. I am making my children drink now for improving their memory – my second daughter found out that when she drank a few cups of the boiled pegaga a day during her exam week, she could study extremely well and just by reading a sentence, she can remember the facts immediately. No need to memorise like crazy. She said her mind remained fresh and alert (or is it her memory) during the exam the next day and she thought she did very well, Now, she is waiting for her final exam results…hoping that she will be the top student in her course!

      So, now I am making sure that is a continuous supply of fresh pegaga leaves and boiled pegaga drink 24/7! It’s really a miracle herb! :lol:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  36. 74

    Felicia said,

    Hi Theresa,

    Good morning to you. Nice to have known you thru this blog…

  37. 75

    Felicia said,

    Good morning Sister Choesf,

    This morning when I woke up, I was shocked to see my pot of pegaga leaves dying.. The whole pot of pegaga leaves drooping down..I am not sure what happen…I water them and is not in direct sunlight…Feed them with some fertilizers bought from the nursery yesteray…

    Any tips?
    :-(

    • 76

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear sister Felicia :D

      Sorry for the late reply as I was busy :oops: …. but I am very glad Theresa was there to give you some good advice. Looks like your pegaga plants in the pot are revived! :wink:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  38. 77

    Theresa said,

    Hello Felicia,

    Nice to know you from Ms. Choesf’s blog too. You must be very disappointed seeing your newly bought pegaga plant that way. Could it be that the fertilizer is too strong, or that you feed your plant too much of it?

    When I bought my pegaga plant from the World Farm three or four weeks ago, I had asked the staff there if it needs to be fertilized. A lady worker there said that she fertilizes the herbs about once every 8 days. And that because she had just fertilized it the day before I bought my pegaga plant. I did not feed it any more fertilizer. And until today, I still have not given my plant any fertilizer. So far my pegaga plant is doing quite well. I stayed on a hight floor without any balcony or garden space. I put mines on my kitchen window sill that does not get any direct sun.

    I only water mines once every morning with a few cups of water. I pour in a cup, let it drain out before I pour in another cup. I guess you can give yours a good watering to wash out some of the fertilizer. It could be overdosed.

    Good luck.
    ~Theresa

  39. 78

    Felicia said,

    Hi Theresa,

    Thank you for your tips!….This morning I decided to pour a cup of water into the pot of dying pegaga before I left the house for some errands. Viola! When I returned home, the pot of pegaga leaves rise again and is alive! I guess must be I have not feed them with enough water. Haha!

  40. 79

    Theresa said,

    Hello Felicia,

    That is good news. I am so happy for you that your pegaga plant did not die, it was only thirsty. :D

    Ooops, Hi Choesf, did not mean to leave you out of the conversation. Hehe…

    Happy planting.
    ~Theresa

    • 80

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear Theresa :D

      Heheh, I was away for 2 days as I was very busy :oops: ….but no worry at all about leaving me out. In fact, I am very glad you were around to advice Felicia. :wink:

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  41. 81

    Felicia said,

    Hi Theresa,

    Its really good news for me…Today, I am adding some pegaga leaves into my fresh salad for the family…So far I have tried the taste of ONE pegaga leaf yesterday….it tasted like green mint leaf with no bitterness taste.. I have yet to be brave enough to make into juice….haha..due to my fear of triggling my acid reflux…Hehe

  42. 82

    Felicia said,

    Good morning Sister Choesf,

    I am happy that you are in the loop in our conversation. :-)

  43. 83

    Theresa said,

    Hello Ladies,

    TGIF! How was your dinner? I just finished mines.

    Happy: I showed my son what you said about your 2nd daughter telling you how drinking boiled pegaga drinks had help her with her studies. He quickly went and pour himself half a cup. :) I am still wondering where I can buy the same harvested pegaga leafs you get from your wet market.

    Felicia: How was your salad? With all the other mixture of vegetables and thousand island dressing, you probably did not even taste the pegaga leafs that you added in with your salad. And WOW, salad for five, you must have used up 1/3 of your pegaga plant. Haha… YOu should buy another pot, or cut off some sections and plant the nodes for more pegaga leafs.

    Have a nice weekend ladies.
    ~Theresa

    • 84

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good morning, dear Theresa :D

      Hahaha….your son is so cute – he quickly helped himself to the pegaga drink hor after hearing about my daughter’s experience! :lol:

      I am in the midst of observing my children on the effects of drinking or eating pegaga and the effect of pegaga in improving their memory. Will make a new post out of that topic. :wink:

      Even here, the actual pegaga leaves, the Centella Asiatica, can’t be found every day and I often have to ask at the Malay stalls to order some in advance. Otherwise, I will use the other variety, the type with the fluted-edged leaves. According to the Malays, they use the fluted type if they don’t want their blended drinks to taste so bitter and they use the Centella Asiatica if they want more medicinal value. :idea:

      I read in the Internet that the Centella Asiatica is a very common plant that grows easily and wildly over many areas in India, and that elephants like to eat them. Hey, isn’t there a saying ===> “An elephant never forgets?” :lol:

      Do have a wonderful weekend!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

    • 85

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Happy Birthday to you, dear sister Felicia! :D

      May this joyous day bring you lots of fulfilled wishes, love, prosperity and longevity!

      With love and hugs,

      choesf :D

      • 86

        happyhomemaker88 said,

        Hello there, ladies! :D

        Heheh, indeed I was MIA yesterday – went around paying bills and running some errands most of the day. Kaput by evening and didn’t cook. Gave my children some money and they went out to have their dinner. They ta pau some sashimi for me. :D

        Felicia, I’m glad your salad w the healthy pegaga was a success! It’s good that your family ate them. At the rate you are going with its consumption, you will need to buy 2 more pots of pegaga for rotation! :idea:

        Ladies, I was thinking, as the pegaga leaves are only sold at some of the Malay stalls selling vegetables and herbs here like lemon grass, curry leaves, ulam, etc….you may try those wet markets that have Malay stalls and ask them about Daun Pegaga. :idea:

        Do have a wonderful weekend!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  44. 87

    Felicia said,

    Hi Theresa,

    Our salad turns out well…I plucked about 13 leaves and mixed with the rest of the greens…Did not tell my daughter that I have plucked our pot of pegaga leaves or else she wont eat the salad…Haha! My husband tasted it and said it tasted minty and slight bitter taste at the end.of the leaf…Overall not too bad..

    Maybe if I visit the Nursery, may purchase another pot but the distance is very far and petrol consuming….for a $6 pot of pegaga plant! Haha!

    You too have a good weekend…Guest sister choesf is MIA…Haha!

  45. 88

    Theresa said,

    Hello…….. Oh, the BIG B-day. Happy birthday, Felicia!

    Hi Choesf, Yupe, my son is 14yrs old. And it is final exam time here also.

    I have not seen any vegetable stalls attended by Malay stall holders at the wet markets that I had been to. Either the Tiong Baru or Ferrar Rd. market. It is all chinese selling stuff. Maybe at the Malay Village. I don’t even know where that is.

    ~Theresa

  46. 89

    Felicia said,

    Hi Theresa and Sister Choesf,

    Thank you for the birthday greetings! I feel so touched …..to receive wishes at this age….Haha!

    Theresa, Malay village is near Paya Lebar MRT station…A better place to check for pegaga leaves is the Eunos Wet market which is somewhere next to the Malay Village…There is a food market too…

    Happy hunting! Let me know if you manage to find this plant there…hehe

  47. 90

    Theresa said,

    Good Morning Cheosf,

    How are you doing? Just dropping a line that my pegaga plant is so far so good. It was not growing as nice. Its leafs seem like they were growing very slowly. So I bought a package of Bone Meal fertilizer. Gave it one feeding so far and it seems to work. The leafs grew bigger, and there are even new shoots sprouting from the root base.

    Hi Felicia: How’s it going with your Pegaga plant? Are you able to consume a few leafs a day? Have you notice any effects?

    Cheers Ladies,
    Theresa

    • 91

      happyhomemaker88 said,

      Good afternoon, dear Theresa :D

      It’s really good to see you here again. I am fine, thank you. Hope you and your family are doing well, too! :D

      Thank you for the tip on how to fertilise the pegaga plants. I’m glad they are growing well there. ** 2 thumbs up **

      Wow, I’m glad you are finding the enzyme cleaner really good to use. That’s the first feedback I received regarding using the enzyme to wash shower curtains. Good job!

      Do have a wonderful day!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  48. 92

    Theresa said,

    P.S.

    By the way… My first batch of Citrus Eco Enzyme is three months to date, and I’ve harvested it. I should comment on your Enzyme blog; but, since I’m here, I’ll just comment from here.

    I was previously using rice enzyme. I used the citrus enzyme to was my overly stained shower curtain. Sprayed and scrubed with a brush. Left it to soak for 20 minutes. Rinsed it off.. Then I filled a half pail of water with half a cup of enzyme to let it soak in the diluted water. WOW!!! The shower curtain looks close to new. Also used it to wash my floor. The pail of water was close to black after the wash. Also the mirror, like you said, it was lovely clean without streaks.

    Thanks,
    Theresa

  49. 93

    cj said,

    Hi Choesf

    Stumbled on your interesting blog and being the curious cat that i am,,am juicing daun pegaga,,so far this is my second day ..will let you know if i get a boost of super power memory! ( sorely needed) :)
    Thank you and Happy new year!!

    • 94

      Hi there, dear cj :D

      Some friends who are around my age (almost 50) found that after they drink the pegaga (boiled or fresh), their minds didn’t feel as foggy anymore and clearer.

      Hope you see some positive results, too!

      Good Luck!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  50. 95

    min said,

    wow…you bunch of housewives can really talk.. so long- winded. With one topic of daun pegaga can drag so many months…. sigh… get a life and indulge into some hobby. Oh yes, this is your hobby !

    • 96

      Heheh, some of my posts’ commentaries have been ongoing for more than 3 years already! You were wrong to assume that everyone that comments here is a housewife. :lol: :lol: :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  51. 97

    wai said,

    Hi,

    According to the alternative Chinese alternative website you provided on your blog, it says that long term usage of this herb can be toxic to liver and create too much collagen inside the scar tissue may cause collagenoma???

    Does that mean we shouldn’t eat a leave or two every day?

    btw, love your blog. keep up the good work. I’m going to try the recipies regardless….

    • 98

      Hi there, dear Wai :D

      Thank you for pointing out the information at that alternative TCM website, on the negative side effects of taking daun pegaga on a long term basis. This will warn us to be careful and not take this herb for too long a period. :idea:

      The problem is – what is the definition of “long term”, i.e. how long? For my family, I would make the same health herbal drinks/soups regularly for a few months and then stop and move on to other types. So, on the daun pegaga, if we are taking only 2 to leaves daily, perhaps we can take that for 3 months, then give it a 1 month break before continuing to take the 2 to 3 leaves again. It just a suggestion, though… :idea:

      Yesterday, I made a large pot of healthy, yummy fruity pegaga drink consisting of :-

      1 whole sugar cane (just the stem part), cut and split into 6-inch pieces (we had 2 whole sugar canes leftover from our CNY Thnee Kong prayers)
      - 3 large Chinese yellow pears
      – 5 red apples
      – 10 large honey dates
      – 5 cups of daun pegaga

      Method – bring everything to a boil over a big fire, then reduce the heat to simmer for 2 hours. Wow, the fruity drink was very sweet and soothing…plus, it can boost our immunity and memory! :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 99

        wai said,

        Hi Choesf,

        Thank you for another healthy recipe using the daun pegaga — I will most definitely try it out :)

        I think I read somewhere on your blog that you were giving “salt water”‘ to your family in the morning before they eat anything else…Are you making a “brine” using the Pure Himalayan Salt for health benefits?

        I think I’m addicted to reading all the articles concerning health on your blog. Love it! :)

        your loyal follower,
        Wai

      • 100

        Hi there, dear Wai :D

        Thank you for your kind comments. :D

        Yes, I had tried once only, giving my family a glass of salt water (brine?)…one teaspoon of salt dissolved into a glass of water at night. Leave overnight and then drink first thing upon waking up, before brushing teeth. It’s supposed to cleanse our body of extreme heatiness. My children said it was too yucky for them to drink and refuse to drink anymore of that. :lol:

        For me, I experience rumblings in the stomach after drinking salt water and then had very mild diarrhoea. Not sure if that’s usual or not.

        My children liked this fruity pegaga drink – I think I will make more of this version in future. They finished the whole pot in just 3 days…whereas the normal pegaga that I boil with dates is usually drank much slower.

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

    • 101

      Hi there, dear Wai :D

      Thank you for pointing out the information at that alternative TCM website, on the negative side effects of taking daun pegaga on a long term basis. This will warn us to be careful and not take this herb for too long a period. :idea:

      The problem is – what is the definition of “long term”, i.e. how long? For my family, I would make the same health herbal drinks/soups regularly for a few months and then stop and move on to other types. So, on the daun pegaga, if we are taking only 2 to leaves daily, perhaps we can take that for 3 months, then give it a 1 month break before continuing to take the 2 to 3 leaves again. It just a suggestion, though… :idea:

      Yesterday, I made a large pot of healthy, yummy fruity pegaga drink consisting of :-

      1 whole sugar cane, cut and split into 6-inch pieces (we had 2 whole sugar canes leftover from our CNY Thnee Kong prayers)
      - 3 large Chinese yellow pears
      – 5 red apples
      – 10 large honey dates
      – 5 cups of daun pegaga

      Method – bring everything to a boil in a large pot of water over a big fire, then reduce the heat to simmer for 2 hours. Wow, the fruity drink was very sweet and soothing…plus, it can boost our immunity and memory! :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 102

        Messkena Matawie said,

        Hi Choesf
        I didn’t notice this recipe. Infact, I’ll be going to the farm later today; I’m still stuck in the office. There’ll be pegaga and to harvest and I have just cut a stalk of black sugar cane here outside my office. I have to try it today..:-)) Can we freeze the left over drink or should it be cnsumed fresh? And I’m not really sure of the honey dates but I suppose it can be substituted by other tyhpes of dates.

      • 103

        Hi there, dear Messkena :D

        Heheh…I added an “s” to kerabu to make it plural. Kerabu’s include the Thai style of Mango Kerabu, Chicken Feet Kerabu…which use lime juice, fish sauce, raw sliced shallots/small onions, sugar. Very delicious and certainly whets the appetite with the sour, sweet taste.

        The boiled sweet pegaga drink using red/black cane and fruit recipe I have here is something I came up with at the spur of the moment. Dates can be optional. I usually make a large pot of this drink – when it is cooled, I would fill up jugs of it and put in the fridge (not freezer) to drink over a few days. My children prefer this recipe as the one with just the pegaga and honey dates can be quite bitter to taste. :idea:

        I’m afraid my gardening at home is restricted to taking care of some green plants only :oops: – I have no green thumb. :lol:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  52. 104

    Messkena said,

    Thank you for sharing these precious information on pegaga. I planted 2 varieties; the one on the left and the one on the right, but have yet to see the one in the middle. An unknown visitor who just came back from Java left me a tiny pot containing a small pegaga plant (picture on the left) in my hobby farming plot and I planted it in a garden box. With constant watering, it grew so well. Then I planted the wild specie (picture on the left) in the same box but the wild ones were being overtaken by the first specie. I’ve been harvesting them for my local salad dish (urap in Malay) or cook them in coconut milk, served with sambal belachan and salted fish. Gosh, you don’t need to have other fancy dish on the table!!! My younger brother will pull the whole plant out, wash and processed them in the blender with some honey and drink it everyday to rid himself of severe migrane. It works, but you must cut down on your salt intake. With the info that you shared here, I can’t wait to have a go at it. I haven’t completely read your blog as today is the first time I’m here. I’m not sure if you have information on how to processed pegaga for scalp care. I’ll be 53 soon, and my hair is thinning very very fast, and made worse by my bad habit of pulling out strands of hair everyday; I really mean every day. My two hands just can’t stop pulling them out.

    • 105

      Hi there, dear Messkena :D

      Thank you for your comments. Wow, the way you described how you eat your pegaga sound so yummy! I love the pegaga in a salad made from just onions, cucumbers, tomatoes and lime juice.

      So far, I still have no luck planting any pegaga and I have given up on growing them for my own consumption. :oops: As the pegaga is very easily at my local wet market, I can easily get them.

      Oh, I sure can empathise with you on your thinning hair – I will be 50 this year and my baby fine hair is also thinning and hair tonics (even expensive ones) don’t seem to help. I have some other remedies here for preventing hair loss, which you can try and see if it will work for you :idea:

      1) holding at root level a little bunch of hair at one time, wrap that around your fore and middle fingers and give it a tug a few times, repeat over the whole head of hair and do that daily …that helps to strengthen the roots.

      2) use some diluted homemade enzyme as a final rinse when you wash your hair. This was taught to me by a blog visitor, Jessica, from Singapore. The problem is – the enzyme may make your hair tint/dye fade very fast. Here’s my post on how to make cleaning enzymes :-

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/05/02/recipe-for-homemade-citrus-enzyme-a-natural-cheap-effective-all-purpose-cleaner/

      3) I noticed when I was drinking the following healthy vegetable soup, my hair was growing thicker and the hair loss was minimal. However, I can’t take this soup for too long as it is too cooling for my body :-

      http://happyhomemaker88.com/2010/01/06/life-extension-miracle-vegetable-soup-brown-rice-tea-for-treating-cancer-high-blood-pressure-diabetes-for-skin-rejuvenation-slowing-aging-process-other-illnesses/

      Burdock root is good for a healthy scalp.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 106

        Messkena Matawie said,

        Thank you so much. I’ll give it a try soon. As for the salad, well, it’s really delicious. I may just post the recipe for all to try.

        Ingredients:
        Onion, red chillies, chilli padi, belachan – all well roasted
        Grated coconut – roasted till crispy but not brown
        Kenchor roots – pounded
        Kenchor leaves – shredded
        Pegaga – fresh
        bean spouts, kangkong, tapioca shoots – scalded, drain then shredded

        Using mortar, pound the roasted ingredients (coarsely) and the kenchor roots, add salt, sugar to taste, mix well.
        Add the roasted grated coconut and continue to pound, mix well & dish out in a bowl.

        Toss the pegaga, shredded veggies and some of the pounded ingredients, and it’s ready to serve.

        Hope you like it. I don’t really know the English name for “kenchor” or chekor as my family called it, The more you add, roots or leaves, god, the better taste you get for the “urap”.

      • 107

        Good morning, dear Messkena :D

        Thank you so much for your pegaga “urap” salad recipe – oh, it sounds so delicious. I love salads, kerabus, rojaks, achar. I must try out your recipe soon! :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  53. 108

    Messkena Matawie said,

    Oops…don’t shred the bean sprouts.

  54. 109

    Messkena Matawie said,

    Most welcomed. This is my mom’s recipe. Need to ask if you still do gardening at home? I ran out of roselle seeds at this time, all friends don’t seem to have these seeds in stock. And what is kerabus? Is it a kind of local salad dish?

  55. 110

    [...] Centella Asiatica/Gotu Kola/Daun Pegaga – A Miracle Herb You Have Got To Try, An Elixir of You… [...]

  56. 111

    Lisa L. said,

    hey there, i just bought some from Tesco today. i usually drink fresh green juice in the morning and was wondering whether i can juice it together with the green juice (bitter melon, green bell pepper, cucumber, amaranth, apple)?. will the boil daun pegaga with honey dates cause the blood glucose to elevate?

    • 112

      Hi there, dear Lisa :D

      It’s good that you have fresh green juice in the morning. Yes, you can add the pegaga to your regular green juice. :wink:

      The daun pegaga is best taken raw, leaves and all, or juiced, but my children refused to eat the leaves. The other option is to boil them with the honey dates. I use naturally dried honey dates (there are some that have sugar added) and I don’t use too many dates…just enough to impart a slightly sweet taste only. My diabetic friend, KC, can take that boiled drink also. You can also opt to boil without the honey dates, too. :idea:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

      • 113

        Lisa L. said,

        thanks for your quick reply n so glad to know that i can add it to my beloved green juice and i did it this morning. honestly i even eat it raw and i think the taste is just fine…maybe i’m used to the raw taste. my mom even boil the daun pegaga with dried sugar cane n honey dates for my family especially my dad since he has a unresolved cough problem. yup she deconstructed yer recipes a bit. she said that i’m in ‘pegaga mood’ today n i don’t denied it.

        so glad i read the whole post plus the many wonderful comments from your fans. i’m still vary with honey dates but yes i’m gonna boil one without it. i still have some left n am gonna ‘sprinkle’ some in my daily salad n continue adding it into my green juice every alternate days.

        thanks n bless you!

      • 114

        You are most welcome, dear Lisa :D

        Here’s a healthy salad recipe that uses pegaga – it’s slightly bitter taste adds on to the deliciousness of this salad! :idea:

        http://happyhomemaker88.com/2012/04/19/healthy-yummy-cucumber-salad-for-sore-throats-body-heatiness/

        Do have a lovely weekend!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 115

        Mess said,

        Much appreciate all these useful info. I’ll definately visit again. Goodnight.

      • 116

        Good morning, dear Mess :D

        You are most welcome to the information here. :wink:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

  57. 117

    edwin said,

    HI Happyhomemaker88,
    i want to ask is Pegaga can help to reduce kolestrol ?

    • 118

      Hi there, dear Edwin :D

      I am not entirely sure but I read that the pegaga may interfere with cholesterol reducing medication. Also, people with high blood pressure and high cholesterol are cautioned about taking this herb. Some sites do say that it can reduce cholesterol, while others say that it increases cholesterol. :roll:

      If we want to take this herb for its many health benefits (especially for memory and healing) but we are unsure if it may increase our cholesterol, one way to confirm is to take a blood test to check our cholesterol level first…then take another cholesterol test 3 months after taking this pegaga regularly. :idea:

      With best wishes for good health,

      choesf :D

      • 119

        edwin said,

        Hi Happyhomemaker88,

        Curently my kolestrol level reach 7.0 plus , as doc say i already must consume medicne to control. But i wish to seek out other solution b4 taking the medicine.

        When i buy the pegaga, the seller is a ladies. She even know & ask me am i making medicne herb for drink. Then she say yes is good for reduce kolestrol. Even many my Malay fren say pegaga can reduce kolestrol.

        Thats y i so conern & blur with some site stated the pegaga increase the level of kolestrol.

        With life example. 1 of my company staff, he had high kolestrol. After he eat pegaga for 3 month his kolestrol drop. He blend juice & drink daily. He even reduce his weight.

        Another example is, husband of my 1 colleagues, also is high kolestrol. Her husband start consume 1 month medicine then stop. He start take pegaga & drink daily & control his habit of eating. After 1 month his kolestrol also drop significantly.

        Just a sharing to all….who possibel have same concern of this issue. :)

      • 120

        Good evening, dear Edwin :D

        Wah, your cholesterol level is very high indeed – I thought mine was very high at 6.4, which I found out on 18 August, 2012. Then I went on an experiment on a natural remedy to reduce cholesterol really effectively and fast….I posted about it here :idea:

        http://happyhomemaker88.com/2012/08/17/wood-ears-or-black-fungus-an-easy-remedy-to-flush-arteries-clear-blocked-arteries-promote-blood-circulation-lower-bad-cholesterol-cleanse-blood-promote-positive-feelings/

        I had taken almost 1 kg of the “Mok Yee” or Black Fungus already and had a blood test done a few days ago to check my latest cholesterol reading, to see if it has indeed dropped or not. I have yet to take the results and I will post there to let my readers know if that Black Fungus is indeed good for lowering cholesterol. :wink:

        Since you had good feedback from people that you actually know that had taken the pegaga successfully to reduce cholesterol, then I would say that pegaga CAN reduce cholesterol, and you can try pegaga and see. Hope you can let everyone here know if pegaga works for lowering your cholesterol and we will learn about it. :idea:

        Good Luck!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

        P.S. I am preparing a post on an amazing Chinese herb/tea that can do many wonders, among them is lowering cholesterol…so do stay tuned here. :wink:

    • 121

      edwin said,

      yes, its very high…..i just age 28…..sad to find out….so now i start daily drink blended pegaga juice mix wit periak katak & green apple. i just start drink around 4 days. hope really have a good result. i will kept up to dated once my kolestrol drop…..

      thanks for ur sharing……i will try it out too…..

      • 122

        Good afternoon, dear Edwin :D

        Wow, you are only 28 and your cholesterol is so high. Hope you will get it down successfully soon hor. By the way, what is periak katak :?:

        Looking forward to hearing your feedback…Good Luck!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 123

        edwin said,

        hi happyhomemaker88 , thanks for reply…. ;)
        periak katak is the small size bitter gourd… the surface is very ugly 1…

      • 124

        You are most welcome, dear Edwin. Ah, periak katak (PK) is that type of small bitter gourd – thank you, now I know its Malay name. I like to eat PK a lot, as fried in egg or with tuna, or just juiced with green apples. I actually love its bitter taste! :lol:

        Do have a wonderful day!

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

      • 125

        Good afternoon, dear Edwin :D

        I had posted my cholesterol results at the Black Fungus page. I told my Chinese Medicine Shop boss about your high cholesterol and what you were taking, he said pegaga may be too cooling for a young lady your age. He gave this method to you instead to reduce your cholesterol quickly (see my comments copied below from the other post). :idea:

        With best wishes,

        choesf :D

        Hi there, dear friends :D

        I finally got back my blood test results! My total cholesterol level has dropped slightly from 6.4 mmol/L on 19 August, 2012 to 6.2 mmol/L on 09 September, 2012 – not bad for just a 20 day period of taking the black fungus drink. :D

        For that 20-day period :-

        1) I didn’t take the Black Fungus drink continuously for 20 days – I had stopped for about 6 days in between due to not feeling well, or I was trying out the Motherwort tea

        2) I didn’t boil the Black Fungus for many hours in the crockpot/slow cooker all the time. I only did that once and found the drink to be too thick and jelly-like for my taste. But perhaps, THAT would have been more effective in lowering my cholesterol level more?

        3) I didn’t watch my food intake – I continue to eat my usual food. There were instances where I ate fatty foods, like fried chicken, sweet and sour pork….where I took red meat like beef, and seafood. :oops:

        I recently was introduced to another 2 methods to reduce cholesterol…one of them is really easy and tasty. It was recommended by one of the Chinese Medicine Shop owners who said it was a fast way to reduce cholesterol based on the feedback from his customers ===>

        Recipe to reduce Cholesterol level :-

        350 gms Dried Hawthorn fruit (San Char)
        6 large green apples (10 smaller ones)
        4 litres water

        Method – Bring all ingredients to a boil, then simmer in a slow cooker for 8 hours, or on the stove for 2 to 3 hours. When cool, store in bottles in the fridge. Drink 2 to 3 cups daily.

        If one is prone to having gastric pains or have a weak stomach, drink this after a meal and you will be alright.

        The man told me his customers will take this drink before going for a cholesterol check/exam. :lol:

        If anyone tries this Hawthorn & Green Apple drink, let me know how it goes. I know for sure it will taste wonderfully tart (sour)!

        With best wishes for good health,

        choesf :D

  58. 127

    Garry said,

    This is a very common herb in India and mostly everyone takes it. But where to buy this herb in Kuala lumpur? chowkit? also in India we have dried Brahmi also and we can boil it in milk or task with warm water. Pls guide where I can buy fresh and dried form in KL

    • 128

      Hi there, dear Garry :D

      Thank you for sharing your information on this herb in India. I heard that it can be found easily growing in many places in India.

      I usually buy mine from the Indian and Malay vegetable/herbal stalls in the wet market. So, if you can go to a pasar or wet market and approach those stalls, you may be able to buy them there, too. We call it “pegaga” in Malaysia, and so, if you ask around for “pegaga” , someone may guide you on where to find it.

      There are so many health benefits of this herb and I strongly encourage everyone to try taking it for good health! :wink:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  59. 129

    Janet tan said,

    Hi Choesf,
    Where Can we buy Gotu kola in Singapore? Thank you.

    • 130

      Hi there, dear Janet :D

      I am not sure as I am from Kuala Lumpur :oops: , but according to Medicine Woman’s Blog, you can buy Gotu Kola in Singapore from :idea: ===>

      In Singapore, fresh gout kola is available at Tekka Market in Serangoon Road, or the Geylang Serai market in Changi Road. The market vendors know the herb by its Malay name, “daun pengaga”.

      She has a yummy Gotu Kola salad recipe there, too!

      Sometime in August 2012, I made a large batch of Gotu Kola/Daun Pegaga tincture as it more convenient to take and the following observations were found :idea:

      1) my second daughter would take a tablespoon of the tincture every time she is studying or doing an assignment – she said the tincture helped her mind to be clearer and better for concentration.

      2) I tried it on my husband who came home one night a little tipsy from his after office hours’ drinks with his colleagues – he said he woke up the next day without any hangover and his mind was clear. Result – this tincture is a good hangover remedy! :lol:

      3) I took some tincture one morning when I didn’t have a good night’s sleep and I had to drive my children to classes really early at 7am – the pegaga tincture made me very alert mentally and I could focus well on my driving, instead of a blurry state of mind due to lack of sleep.

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  60. 131

    Fay said,

    Hello happyhomemaker88,
    I stumbled upon your blog while checking up on different ways in which we can consume gotu kola. Your blog is really a treasure trove of information on herbs and recipes, which I appreciate so much since there aren’t too many such local (Malaysian and Singaporean) sites.

    I am writing up a “plant snippet” about Gotu Kola for my website and would like to reference some of your recipes and photos, credited and linked to your page.

    Please let me know if it’s ok with you. Thank you!

    Fay
    http://www.facebook.com/HowDoesYourGardenGrow

    • 132

      Hi there, dear Fay :D

      Thank you for your compliments on my blog :oops: … of course, you are most welcome to share my recipes and photos on your website. :wink:

      Heheh, I have a lot to learn about gardening, plants and flowers from your website, too….as I don’t have a green thumb! :lol:

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D

  61. 133

    Wei Arvil said,

    Where can I buy in malaysia? Can I buy pegaga in any market? ?

    • 134

      Hi there, dear Wei Arvil :D

      You can find pegaga at the Malay vegetable stalls that also sell “ulam” herbs in wet markets/pasar. Ask at one Malay stall first, and if there is no pegaga for sale there, ask the owner where you can buy pegaga there :idea: .

      Hope you find some!

      With best wishes,

      choesf :D


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